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ST. DAVID'S COLLEGE.

CORONER'S INQUESTS.

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CORONER'S INQUESTS. [before WM. DAVIES, Esq., Coroner.] On Monday last, an inquest was held at the New Inn, Merthyr, on view of the body of Charlotte u about five years. The deceased was the daughter of Richard Wyatt, a travelling cheese- man. and came to her death in consequence of her clothes taking fire, whilst in the act of warming her hands, during the temporary absence of her grand- mother. Her parents were both in another part of the country, pursuing their ordinary avocation.— Verdict "Accidental death from burning." Immediately after the foregoing, and at the same house, an inquest was held on view of the body of Michael M'Keveregan, a hawker, who had been missing for the last six weeks. From the evidence it appeared that the deceased was last seen, on the night of Monday, September 27, apparently in a state ef intoxication, near the Parliament Lock, Merthyr, picking sticks out of the water. It was between eleven and twelve o'clock when deceased was first observed going towards the water, by two men whose duty it is to regulate the flood gates for the water. In about an hour after finding deceased did not return, one of the men went to look for him, but found him missing. It is presumed that in trying to reach the sticks as they floated past him, deceased overbalanced himself and was carried away by the stream, there being a very heavy flood at the time. His body was found, near Mr. Purchase's floating on the water, about seven o'clock on Saturday night last.—Verdict—" Found drowned." Great dissatisfaction was expressed on Monday evening, by the coroner and the jury, who had walked up to the burial ground at Twynyrodin, where deceased had been interred, at the non-attendance of the grave-digger, to open the grave. We know not with whom the fault lay but we do know that, after sending messengers to that functionary, as well as to the clerk, and waiting a considerable time, the coroner was under the necessity of employing two workmen, to perform that office. We hope we shall not have occasion to notice a recurrence of such neglectful conduct. ÂBERPARE POLICE. [Before G. R. MORGAN, Esquire.] Saturday, OcL 30. Wilham Dovey and William Smith, were chavged with stealing a quantity of beef, the property of Mr. William Morgan, of the Werfa, from a barn at Pantycerddinen, in the above parish, on the night of Friday last. Mr. William Morgan, jun., who went to fetch the beet home, saw it quite safe on a bench in the barn at six o'clock. The door was shut on the latch. He afterwards went into a house, and on his return about eight o'clock, be found the door of the barn open and two pieces of his meat missing. He immediately ipformed Walter, the constable, of the robbery, who went in search of the thieves. The two prisoners were seen near the Cwmbach Col'iery, on the following morning, the prisoner Dovey having two bundles under his arm. and the other prisoner with something under his frock. They were after- wards seen walking on the canal bank towards the village, and the constable, in company with another Eeraon, went after them, but finding they had on undies, he allowed them to go on their way.. Upon further inquiries, however, he ascertained that they had previously been IIce crryig bundles, and upon making a search lie found two bundles in the ditch by the path they had gone along; another bundle was afterwards found in the ditch by two other persons. A witness swore that one of the bundles was exactly the same gort of bundle that he saw with the prisoner Dovey- The prisoners were pursued up the hill towards Merthyr, and brought back. They both denied having bundles. They were, however, committed to take their trials at the next Quarter Sessions. Monday, November 1st [Before G. R. MORGAS and W. THOMAS, Esqrs.] George Smith, was charged with obtaining goods to the amount of 5s. 6d., under false pretences, from the shop of Mr. William Todd, in the villiage of Aberdare. The evidence being conclusive, and the prisoner having nothing to say in his defence, was committed to take his trial at the next Quarter Sessions, At the Carmarthen assizes in 1742, a girl only eight years old was tried for the murder of a brother and sistor,ithe one six, the other four years of age, and acquitted. It appeared that the three children, who lived in a cottage not far from the seat had been frightened with stories of the cruelty of the Spaniards, and the nanger of their landing upon that coast. These children having been one day left alone, when there happened to arise a violent thunder stom, became so terrified as to imagine the Spaniards were coming. and the eldest to avoid falling into their hands, took up a hedging bill in order to destroy herself, which the two younger children observing, cried out re- peatedly, Pray, sister, kill us first," upon which she actually dispatched them. She afterwards desperately wounded herself, but not having strength, or perhaps cqurage enough, after feeling such pain, to complete her design that way, she ran out of the house to a river near it and was going to throw herself in, but was prevented by some, casual passenger, to whom she said, in great terror, that she was going to drown herself for fear of the Spaniards, and that she had killed her brother and sister for the same reason.

ETON COLLEGE;

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NOTICES TO CORRESPONDENTS.

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CARDIFF DISTRICT.

MERTHYR TYPVIK-

BRIDGEND POLICE REPORT.

NEATH PETTY STSKIONS,

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ittonmoutliglure. .

NEWPORT MUNICIPAL ELECTION.

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