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COUNTY OF MONMOUTH ELECTION.—

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COUNTY OF MONMOUTH ELECTION.— RE-ELECTION OF LORD GRANVILLE SOMERSET. This Election, rendered necessary by Lord Granville Somerset's acceptance of the office of Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, took place on Friday the 24th ult., before the High Sheriff, Samuel Homfray, Esq. Lord Granville Somerset entered Monmouth on horsflfeactc, accompanied only bv a few select friends, at about half-past nine, and immediately after pro- ceeded to the Shire Hall, followed by the Hon. W. Rodney, Joseph Bailey, Esq M.P., J. Rolls, Esq., John Roberts, Esq., A. Rolls, Esq.. the Rev. YY Snivthies, T. Oakley, Esq., William Curro, Esq., F. n. Williams, Esq., George Cave, Esq., Mayor of Nioti- mouth. Captain Fleming, R.N., &e. The UnderSheriff, T J.Pliiiiii,q, Esq., having read the writ, the act against bribery", &v the Hon. W. Rodney rose to propose Lord Granville St.)iiit,riut as a fit and proper person to represent them. Biiley, M.P., seconded the nominal ion. No other candidate being proposed, the II i ,dl Sheriff declared Lord Granville Charles Henry Somerset duly elected. Lord G. SOMERSET rose amid immense cheering to return thanks for the honour they had done him, and said before he expressed the feelings of gratitude he felt now, as on many previous occasions (hear, hear), he tnight perhaps be permitted to advert, briefly to some peculiar circumstances attendant on the present election (hear, hear); and lie wished the more to do so, because ever since 110 had been connected with them, it had been his anxious wish and most earnest endeavour not to conceal anything from them. (Cheers.) First, then, as regarded tile change of the day for the election from Monday last unto the present day, lie need not trouble them with the caues of ihe delay of the receipt of I he writ from London, but. having heard those circumstances, and fearing that a sullicient time had not been given betwpcn thp proclamation and the day fixed (Monday), he had, lie would own, ventured to make an ap- plication to the High Sheriff to extend the time, and he must now express his thanks to him for having so protracted the day, in order that ample time might be given, he not thinking it fitting, that in order to, consult any personal or private convenience of his own that them should be any abridgement of that ample time which tho electors ought to have. (Clicers.) Another circumstance to which he would call their attention was his absence on the occasion of paying those visits to the various parts of tho country, and of those written communications to the electors which it was his habit to make. He had not done so, because he relied on their knowledge of him (cheers), because lie relied on the kindness with which they bad received him on so many occasions, because he had so lately met tiiein in the various parts of the county and that ball (cheers), and having undergone no change in principles from when lie had first ad- dressed them, had given him still further confidence to appear before them this day without (with the exception of public advertisements) having entered into any personal solicitations or personal canvas". (Cheers.) He hoped, however, that in so doing he had neither shown any want of respect to the county or any overweening vanity, for nothing could be further from his intentions. (Cheers) Having made those explanations, ho congratulated them that the jealousy of the constitution obliged those persons who had accepted office under the Crown to come before their constituents for re-cleclion. He congratulated himself that it was so, because it had been the cause of his again submitting him". If to them to recrive their suffrages, and because their re- election of him that day afforded him the best proof that his accepting office had not been deemed by them as disqualifying him from representing them, hut that, on the contrary, it had been viewed by the county with satisfaction. (Cheers.) It Avas said by some persons that no person ti,)Iiliti,r office under the Crown could fairly represent the people. He, however, thought otherwise; hn had never thought it a dis- qualification that a representative of tiie people- should be in the service of his Sovereign, but that it was proper and beneficial that it should he so as it more i itimately connected them both. (Grpat cheers.) He had bad the honour of holding oihec on former oc.cacioiis, and as lie had not then, as lie trusted, in any way neglec'ed the iuterc<!n of his constituents, so he that in holding office now he should not neglect t¡¡PIIJ (great cheering); for if he thoug-ht that by holding office he could not properly attend to them h" trusted that lie possessed honour enough to no lunger continue to hold it. (Cheers.) Out lie h id taken office because, as he had said, he believed f at it was well that there should be a con- nexion between the people and Crown. (Cheers.) It had been said that tll,' Government of which he had b'T.oine a member had great ddli'mlties to en- counter, and I In-ir opponents appeared to rejoice in those difficulties tie hoped, however, thil: they should be able to surmount them (caeers), and he trusted that t!!I'V should be found as zealously sup- porting the true liber ie* of the subject as those who clamoured so !oi«dlr in pi .-list: or and thai whether Inev .at on fire rigal-lnnd or left, they should foi'uet, liecairse they were e-Up'oVCtl by the Crown, thit they were I kv i t I I the p< ople. II- had olten .Spoken of Sir ltnoert Peel s conduct, hut at present he would refer them to his dec!ar;it i'.ns, from which they would obsen e that lie was IICI: her p'ed^ed to abuses, not- to the neople's distresses (cheers); t lion d, he was opposed to hasty and ill considered changes (ehe-Ts); and they won d:11 ad ie i 1 tint it required due ci-nsidem- ti.ii'i to uting oil thfte matters which were biu.h n-oine to lnrge classes of I lie people. (Crieeis.) Hii H. reel's intentions were, lie believed, to give relief lo those distresses, alld a. substantial relief as coll id be given; and lie C"ur It. Peel) showed vreat prudence and a wisediscie- tion in adjourning tlie present PaTliameut. in order that, those subjects mi :ht receive a calin and can lid consideration during the recess. had the firmest reliance ou the sound sense of the iniss (if tii,, people of this country, and was as'iured that they would appreciate Sir If Peel's motives and would ear even the "real distress to wliic 1 they were at present snbjec ed with patience and submission (Hear.) He knew it was the fis'iion among the ad vocates of a of the present corn iaw* to call those who were opposed to such repeal by the most opprobious titles he wou d not, however, reciprocate my such Imgu igo, but earnestly beg them to con-nit the saeri-d volume, not for texts which lo s. i tirotber against brother, fa:her against son, anil man against man, but to read suc.i p rtions as inculcated br tberly love and toleration to those who might entertain different opinions. He could not help thinking that some of those gentlemen were actuated more- by a desire to increase their own pro- fits than with a view to beneftl the labouring classes, (Hear.) Tiiev appeared to him to W»' get that thiscoutl try was not a simple machine, but a country made up of a combination of various classes, and that there vvi l e toereiore otoer Interests to hi C aiSulle.J besides those or ttie manufacturer however strong might he hi-claims. (Hear.) if lie (land H. t) lid mil consei. ntiously believe that the corn laws were for the t.enefit 01 every class in the coiiimuni v, be would not stand there I"kl, one moment to support them (H.'ar) The late Government had attempted to carrv a(Itjlv of 8 per quarter, with a view, as they said, to a steadiness A>f price, hut, in his opinion, a much greater steadiness was the result 01 the present system. A fixed duty would not prevent the showers they had IHI recently vvilue-sed, nor a six biting frost, nor a continued lall of SIIOW, n >r would it in any way control tho elements, which wf re regnbited by a great and invisible Power, vvhotu no logisallivn enactment could reach. lie did not, however, when he said this, mean for one moment to assert that no improvements could be made in the present laws. (Cheers.) lie was perfeitiy aware that when an individual accepted ofike he must be pr'-parcd to support the political views of his coad- jutors. (Hear.) T'lis course was necessary, or the affairs of the country could not be satisfactorily carried on, and indeed it was essential to political honesty,*for few tilings caused so much political dishonesty as a difference of opinion among those who constituted the Government of a country, and if the opiniuns of an individual wltprc not the same as those of the chief members of the Government, he ought to abstain altogether from holding office. (Cheers.) He therefoie felt bound to declare that he was fully prepared to support the political principles of tho Right Hon. llarollclnow at the bead of Her Majesty's Government, and as an individual member of the Administration he was not ashamed to say that he did concur in the opinions of that right hon. gentleman (cneers), and that he felt assured that the people of this country would consider the combination of tho present Cabinet such as would he likelv to do great good to tile country. (Hear, hear.) He begged now to ofler a few remarks on the appointments of Lord Stanley and Sir J. Graham. He considered that the great experience they had of public busitii-ss, aiuftbat the great ability which they possessed, fully entitled them to the distinguished honor conferred on them. (Cheers) lie b :d known those gentlemen in private life, and they were there every thing that was esti- mable-, and when lie joined these to their other qualifications, lie should have been deeply grieved if Sir- Pee! had not invited them to join him in his Administration. (Clear.) He looked at the in- tegrity ol their principles in sacrificing honors, place, and power, when in the height of their popularity, for the sake of their principles, when they relinquished office rather than assist in an attack on the Established Cuurcb, as a high example of political integrity. (Cheers.) They were superior to the inducements offered by place and power, but they were not superior to the considerations of public dutv. (Hear.) Was not this a guarantee that in uniting with Sir Robert Peel, after having watched his public conduct for six years, that they would never swerve from their principles? (Hear.) Those guarantees, h« thought, were safer and mure to be relied on than tlwstrollgest oy loudest protestations; and finding, as he did, such proofs of public principle, joined to the greatest recti- tude of conduct in private life, he felt assured that he was not biinded by the feelings of private friendship in expressing his conviction that the Administration of Sir Robert Peel would be found to give greater and more general satisfaction in the measures they would propuse for the efficient and substantial relief of the existing distresses of the people than the Adminis- tration which had preceded it. Alter alluding to some local matters, and to the handsome manner in which the expenses of his late eleclien had been paid without his knowing who had been the contributors, bo said he could not but leel lhatsilch a mark of their esteem and approbation of his conduct after 25 years' service was most gratifying. And again thanking them, his Lordship sat duwn nmid loud and long continued cheering. Thanks having been given to the Iligli Sli*(,i-ifffor his excellent conduct, the noble Lord was chaired through the town, and the electors afterwards sat down with his Lordship to an excellent dinner at the Beaufort Arm which was served up in excellent style by the landlord, lUr, Whiting, and at which tho usual loyal and constitutional to.ists were drullk with due honours.

? CONFIRMATION HDIN. -

TO THE CAMBRIAN MUSE.i

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