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AIIPALLING liuictr)E.-On the evening of Sunday last, a catasirophe of the above description took place at Alkrington Colliery, near Middleton, by which a mother and three children have been plunged into great distress, and the feelings of a large number of friends and acquaintances of the deceased have been strongly excited. A little after eleyen o'clock a man named James Guest, 42 years of age, who had Ion, been employed by Mr Livesey as bookkeeper at the above works, rushed out of his cottage, near one of the pits, and threw himself headlong donn a shaft about 150 yards in depth. He had latterly become very low in spirits, in con- sequence of having to leave the employ of MrLive- sey, who is about giving up the works. He was a man of steady habits and of good character, and had succeeded in obtaining another situation but after trial. he was not satisfied with it, and came home to Alkrington. On Sunday he was IInllsually dis- tressed, and told his wife he was ill all over, both ill his head and his limbs. She missed him. and saw him rush past the window towards the coalpit, and she followed, calling, James, James, stop, stop." He was heard to say, Whisht," and almost instantly disappeared down Ihe pit, to which she approached near enough to hear his crashing against the horse trees and guiding rods as he fell. "Oh, God!" she cried, ttiat's him," and s'ood paralysed. unable to go ou or return. A number of coli iers were soon mustered, some of whom descended into the pit, and they sent up the mangled body of poor Guest, almost cut in two at the middle. and disfigured in a most shocking manner. An inquest will be held to-morrow; but as the above are facts, a verdict of temporary insanity only can be antici- pated Manchester Guardian. KXTKNSITB ROBBERY. At the Maidsione Assizes, on Wednesday week, W. Stevenson, porter in the house of Messrs Mercer and Co., bankers, Ma i lstone, was indicted for stealing a bag con- Miitiiug 500 sovereigns. Ui-om the evidence if appeared, that in October, 1839, Mr Mercer wrote to Messrs Masterman, the bankers, to remit to him XI,500 in gold and .£5'10 in silver, and that sum was accordingly placed in seven bags, one contain ing XI,000 in gold, another .£500 in gold, and five bags "f sitter, each containing X]OO, and the whole were placed in a box (of which Messrs Masterman and Mercer had each a duplicate key). and delivered to the care of Wallis, a Maidstone coachman, who duly conveyed it to Maidstone, and the prisoner was sent to fetch it he tonk the box to the,bank about seven o'clock in the evening, and it was taken from him by Mr Mercer, juti., who unlocked it and took out the hags of coin, and, without examining them, placed them ill the strong chest, but he observed at this time there were only six bags, viz., one farlre one, which he supposed contained the £1,500 in gold, and the five baizo of silver. The next morning upon the money being examined, it was found E.500 short of the proper quantity of gold, and on a com- munication being made to Messrs Masterman, the loss of the second bag of gold was discovered. No clue whatever at this time could be obtained as to the perpetrator of the robbery, but no suspicion was entertained of the prisoner, and he was retained in the prosecutor's service until the following month of January, when for some act of misconduct he was dismissed. Shortly after this the prisoner set up in business in the town as a grocer, and some other circumstances coming to the knowledge of the pros cutors, induc. d a suspicion that he was the thief. The inquiry being followed up, u variety of circum- stances were adduced, which appeared to bring the charge clearly home to the prisoner, and the jury returned a verdict of Guilty.— I'he court sentenced him to 14 years'transportation. MYSTEUIOUS AFFAIR.-The following account is vouched for as true, and many particulars not here related would be given by the editor to any persoii likely to give a citie to tile sol,.tion of tile mystery. A gentleman of elegant manners and address, call ing himself Captain Henry Maxwell, and his sister M iss Maxwell, took up their residence in a town near this city. \Vanting a house, they called upon a widow lady who bad one to let, where Captain M axwell saw and admired her eldest daughter, an accompliced and beautiful young woman, 24 years old, to whom he made offers of marriage. He stated himself to be connectpd with Sir Murray Maxwell, and the nephew of a gentle- man of fortune of his own name. near Cork, in Ireland, on whom he depended principally for an income. They were married, and Captain Maxwell, after going to London with his bride, where he seemed to shun being seen about the streets, left her for a short time to go to Hanover, where he held a military appointment. On his return they went to reside at Boulogne, where the husband received a letter from Ireland, on which he told his wife that his uncle was dying, and that he would leave her to go home under the care of his sister, who votildjoin him at their tincle's in Ireland. A fo, tnight afler the young lady's arrival at the house of her mother she received a letter fronTMiss Maxwell, dated from Mount Maxwell, near Cork, informing her that Captain Maxwell had died eight days alter his uncle, in a high fever. and that (tie tincle, displeased it It his marriage, had altered his will before his death, leaving him nothing, and that his own property, being only a life interest, ceased with his death. Letters were sent to Cork addressed to Miss Max- well, making the requisite inquiries about Captain Maxwell's death, and these were returned with the notice from the post office that no such placeexisted as that from which Miss Maxwell dated her letters, nor was any family of the name known in Cork or the neighbourhood. All inquiries have failed in producing- any elucidation of the sftange mystery. Captain Maxwell told his wife he was known to 'he Duke of Wellington, the Marquess of. £ >ourpf a son of the Earl of Wemyss, Captain Marry^t.the author, with whom he sailed on board of his ship that he was with a Mr Fitzroy, in Hanover ;'was related to the Marchioness of Donegal, Mr Coltliiirgt, and General Gillespie. He had £ 70&.with him when he left his wife, besides a latge chest of plate, See, There were many books and other things which might have led to a knowledge of who h^ «a«, which the sister most cunningly possessed Iitrlf of.- Exeter Flying Post. ,■■ f ANCIENT OAK.—The Ametican Papers conraJi* the following account of an inteiestiug relic recently discovered in the county of Wayne it appedrs that a white oak tree was cut down, in the town of Lyons, Wayne county, New York, measuring four feet aud a half iu diameter. In the body of the free. about four feet and a half from the ground, was found a large and deep cutting hy an axe, severing the heart of the tree, and exhibotig, with perfect dis- tinctness, the marks of the ate at the present time7 The whole cavily thus created by the original cullitig was found to be encased by 460 years' growth of j the wood, i. e., it was concealed beneath 460 layer* of the timber which had grown over it subsequently to the cutting. Consequently the original cutting must have been in the year 1374, or 118 years before the discovery of America by Columbus The cutting was at least six inches deep.

TRADE.J .

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