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SCKIPTURE ILUJSTBA'I'IOSS.—iSo.…

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A\KC[>orE OF ClKKAN, AS KI-I.ATKD BY HlM- sFLF When a boy, I was one morning playing at marbles in the village ball-alley, with a light heart and lighter pocket. I he gibe aud the jest went jrailv round, when suddenly there appeared amongst lis a stransrer, of a very rcma) kable alld very cheerful aspect; his intrusion was not the least restraint upon our merry little assemb'a^e. He was a benevolent creature, and the days of infancy (after all, the hap- piest we shall ever see) perhaps rose upon his memory. God bless hiID 1 1 see his fine form, at the distance of half a century, just as he stood before 111 e in the litt'e bali-alle v in the day* of my chi'dhood. Hi name was Boyse; he was the rector of New- market. To me he took a particular fancy. I was ,illl1;ng-. and was full of waggery, thinking every thing that was eccentric, and by no means a miser of mv eccentricii ies every one was welcome to share ot" thcln, and I had plenty to spare after having freighted the company. Some sweatu/eats easily bribed me home with him. I learned from poor Bovse m v alphabet and m v grammar, and the rudi- ments of the classics. Me taught me all be could, and then he sent me to the school at Middleton. In short, be made a man of me. I recollect it was aliout five and thirty vears afterwards, when 1 had risen to some eminence at the bar, and when I had a seat in P irliameut, on my return one day from Court, 1 found an old gentleman seated alone in niv draw- ing-room •, bis feet familiarly placed 011 each side of the Italian m arble chimney-piece, and bis whole air bespeaking the consciousness of one quite at home. lie turned round—it was my friend of the ball-alley. ] rushed instinctively into his arms, and burst into tears. Words cannot describe the scene which fol- lowed: "You are right, Sir: you are light. The chin!cv-piece is yours-- the pictures are yours—the i,ise is vour.,i. You rave me a!l I have—tny friend inv father-my benefactor He dined with me; and in the evening I caught the tear glistening in his fine blue eye, when he saw poor little Jack, the creature of his bounty, rising in the Hon>e of Commons to reply to a Rt. Hon. Poor Boy-e he is and no suitor had a larger deposit of practical benevolence in the Court above. This is his wine let us drink to his memory. ELECTRO MAGNETISM.—The inining Journal gives a letter from New York, "showing the pro- gress made in America, in the application of Electro Magnetism as a motive power. The following is ;iti extriict:TV,,e last machine constructed by >Ir r>jvenport occupies a surface of ahout eighteen inches square—that is, eighteen inches 011 each side, and con-ists merely of a platform, having upon it an iron circular frame, with an arch extending from side to side above it, a spindle in the centre playing in this arch at top, and in a socket below, and on this "pilldle an iucomp'ete wheel, formed by two cross-pieces of iroll, with segments of a circle at th? four extremities. It is in fact a wheel, with four breaks in its periphery. Some hundreds of feet of isolatpd, or coaled, copper wire are wound around the cross-pieces, and also round the fixed circular frame; the connection with the galvanic ba'teries, which are three small cylinders, each con- sisting ot six concentric tubes of zinc and copper, t 'e outer one scarcely larger .than a quart pot, is. as usual, by small rods of copper. The revolving wheel is six inches in diameter, and weighs about six pounds. Attached to the upright spindle is a small cog-wheel, which may be made to work in other wheels, with axles, for the purpose of showing how great a weight can be raised from the ground. With the three batteries acting on it, the revolution of the wheel was 1000 times in a minute; and these 1000 revolutions raised a weight of 2()()Ib..3. one foot. The first machine made by Mr Daven- port, which is much smaller and has but one bat- tery, raised but 241bs. He is confident that with a number of batteries, or one very large one-say as l ij; as a barrel — there would be power enough to drive the largest machinery while the cost of con- structioll would be reduced to a fitth, or perhaps a tenth, and that of attendance, fuel, &c., now forming so heavy an item in the expenses of steam-power, would be almost done away with. Halt a barrel of blue vitriol and a hogshead or two of water would send a ship from New York to Liverpool and no accident could possibly happen, beyond the breaking of some part of the machinery, which is so simple that any damage could he repaired in hall a day. Surely it is a great and vastly important discovery and the wildest imagination can hardly gra-i, the %voiiders in achieving which it may, aud doubtless will, become the ioslrument,"

CHIT CHAT.I -i

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