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^HVll TYDVil, DAV, J"1# 29,…

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=-=. -_c_- --=- merthyr. ROROUGH ELECTION. The Merthyr election has terminated in a way most consistently with the cause of "Liberalism'"—and most disgraceful to the cause of decency, order, and common sense. Every trick and artiifce that cunning eould supply-every injustice that malice could perpe- trate—every fraud that could be adopted to rob electors of their privileges—-and,finally, every species of intimidation that Radical Ironmasters, assisted by their agents, could devise, have all been brought to crush tue freedom of election and to bear against the cause of Mr Bruce—and the issue has been that Mr Guest has been returned by a majority of 133. It is quite impossible that the success of so much falsehood and intimidation can be otherwise than temporary— the state of the representation of Merthyr will be brought before the House of Commons, and if this wretched borough is not. disfranchised, itseontinuance will be fraud upon the Reform Bill, and a disrace to civilized England and Wales. Some twenty years hence, perhaps, Merthyr may be restored to the list of boroughs entitled to send a Member to Parliament; at present its constituency, overawed by Dowlais and Cyfarthla, is a mockery of the very name of dent. We will proceed to give a short account ot the I proceedings which have taken place during the election that has passed—in which, as we before observed, every unconstitutional act that could obstruct the course ol independent thought and freedom of action has been practised by men who have arrogated to tile, titic. of "Liberal, which, being in- is freedom from all the restra ints of honour, the obligations of decency and the usages of civilised man. •" Monday, as we announced, was the d.vy of nomina- tion Dowlaispoured its myrmidons iutotbe town; but, m justice to the spirits who composed them it must be said, that the cry in favour of their employer, was feeble, hesitating, "and unwilling, and might easily have been converted into an Hurrah for the JJruce." I ne party of this gentleman confined their gathering to stich unbought and unforced attendance as chose to volunteer an appearance; and the heartiness of their cheers formed a striking contrast to the noise of tbeir opponents. The business of the day was opened by reading the proclamation, the writ, aud other formalities; upon which, j lwmas, Esq., the Returning Officer delivered a protest against the reception of the register placed in his hands, the requirements of the Act of Parliament not having A(,.t ( I been performed by his predecessor. We have since learnt that this important document had been in the hands of Ili- Committee, at the Rush, and what erasures and interpolations it may have received there, will appear before a proper tribunal; but we assert that a more flagrant dereliction of duty on the part of the offieer, and a more "ross instance of neglect or of partiality,has never been submitted j 0 a Committee of tlie I louse ol Commons since the passing of theReform Bill, Rut, to proceed with the uainuive. After these rOI':nalitil's ¡¡(Ie! ()/W;Udl'Ù, :\11' ('1"¡\1by rose to pro- pose Mr Guest to the consideration of* tile electors, "e was the only person listened to throughout the proceedings. Mis speech consisted of an eu'ogv on Mr Guest's consistency which, as Mr Crawsbay bad vigourously opposed Mr Guest at the last election, excited some astonishment among his bearers. Bllt on went the worthy speaker with bis praises of -lIr Guest, of Radicalism, and consistency utterly we hope) forgetting that he himself had so recently been the warmest supporter of Mr Meyrick, a Conservative. Truly, the weathercock paraded during the election was not all inappropriate emblem of this gentleman's versatility. Mr Christopher James seconded the nomination of Mr Guest.^ Mr Hill then rose to pro- pose Mr Bruce, and his rising was the signal for the Dowlais mo!) (which by tue bye, has hanpily enough received the nick-name ol Leans's Brigade,") 'to commence tlie veilings and hootings, for wiiic thev nad been collected, and which prevented every gen- tleman, who afterwards endeavoured to address tliem from being heard. Mr Meyrick in dumb show, Mr Bruce's nomination; and Mr Guest and Nir Bi-iice in vain endeavoured to get a 1, 0111 their senseless audience. The show of hands wis declared to be in favour of Mr Guest, although it is very doubtful, whether the people knew wbicb candi- date they were supporting, as the noise was deafening A Poll was then demanded for air Bruce. The crowd was immense: nearly 10,030 persons were supposed to be present, and the town presented a scene of the greatest disorder during the whole of the eveuiu" The polling took place on the next dav, Tuesday. It had been arranged that there should be three polling booths; one at Aberdare, one at Dowlais and one at Merthyr. It had been hoped that by these means the crowd would have been divided, and tint the operatives" of Dowlais, who had been so ob- streperous on the day before, would have staved to watch proceedings at home. But it had been other- wise planned bv the Liberal" party. N0 sooner had the polling commenced, than a band of ruffians as- sailed the bootb with volleys of the stones collected for the building of the new Market Place, and so effectu- ally preventcu the electors from that. after about SO had been polled, the Returning- Officer adjourned the poll till next day, having first recorded the outrageous disturbance that took place. Many persons were severely wounded; friends and foes suffered alike; alld we were sorry to observe a ellticlrl III o,t"j professional gentleman of the Liberal pady frig-htrully gashed in the face. The mob then paraded the street^ for the rest of the day, armed with large clubs and wijh stones, until the safety of the town was so endangered, that at nine o'clock in the ev ening Mr A. II ill swore in special constables for the protection of the peace. WEDNESDAY.—The polling recommenced at half- past eight in the morning for Merthvr and Vainor, Aberdarc and Dowlais having been completed within the prescribed time. In consequence ot the scandalous tumult of the day preceding, the Candidates and their friends had arranged that no banners, music, or badges should be exhibited, and that none but ElectorssllOuJJ enter the field; the last condition was found impracti- cable but owing to the arrangements which had been made, the polling was not interrupted. About one o'clock in the afternoon all the voters likely to be forthcoming having been polled, and it appearing by the books that Mi Guest was 13 a-Ilcad, both Candi- dates agreed that the poll should be closed. The numbers being. For Mr Guest 310 Air Bruce 177 Majority for Mr Guest. 133 The above votes for Mi Guest include a large number of persons who had removed to Rvmnv and other places, some of them r_etul'IlllJfor temporary occupa- tion but the Retui mug Officer allowed their votes, with a protest on Air Bruce's behalf. When it is considered that Mr Bruce, had to con- tend vitil tlle powerfu) influence of Cvfarthfa and Dowlais, both most earnestly and pressingly exer- cised: with the ultra-Radicals: with the James and Jones association- and, also, with an Ironmaster nearer home, Wit!1 whom, up to the dav of his start- ing, lie had lived on terms of the closest intimacy and friendship, it is a high tribute to the private and punlic character of Mr Bruce, that so many indepen- dent electors were found bold enouarh to espouse his cause; embracing though it did, the cause of the sick and aged poor, and that of the Protestant faith. Mr A. HILL then came to the front of the hustings, and stated that as the votes were exhausted, the Candidates had agreed that the poll should close he advised the people to disperse to their own homes,and to make up all their differences. Mr GUEST shortly addressed the electors, stating that though the poll could not be actually closed till four o'clock, he considered himself virtually their representative: that he believed the of his constituents desired a Liberal, and as lie bad acted up to Liberal principles, he trusted be had not forfeited the good opinion of his constituents. He had a hisfh respect for g;v(, ililn fill credit for honesty of purpose in his political opinions, and claimed such credit for his own. No doubt they de- sired the same end, the welfare of their country; but would use different means to obtain it. He earnestly recommended the to all their election quarrels to obliv.on, and to return to their homes, determined to forget and forgive. MK BRUCE then said, that the situation he then occupier had not been of his own s^ekin^; and that A. Hill and others could testify how importu- nately he had besought them to stand in his place- as, however, Mr Guest, not content with the borough, had grasped at the county also, he should be readily acquitted of presumption in picking UP a crumb winch had fallen from the rich manYtnble. It had been falsely said, that because he had been born and bred a mem icrof the Established Church, that he was thereto.e unfriendly to the Dissenters: a more scan- (Ialous eitarg-e had never heen made: he defied any man to say, that in the course-of rather a long and active life, he bad even oppressed or thwarted a Dissenter; that as to the cant watch-word of Ciril ard Religious Liberty, which some persons exclusively approp. uited, be thought they would find some difficulty in rlefining the motto-but he would tell them what it was not. It was conducive to religious liberty to follow submissively in the wake of y Ministry who were the too)sofapopish dictator—and he could also tell them what was not civil liberty, but that his trienc on hij lelt (Mr A. Hill) had implored him not to touch upon the Poor Laws, lest he should excite the people. He certainly had intended to have entered lully mtotiie discussion of the Bastardy, and non-relief clauses on the day of nomination, but his opponents harl taken pretty good care that the people should not hprlr him. As to what he had adverted to, touching tie lotostant Faith, it was far from his desire to raise an unnecessary cry of No Popery;" but it was the opinion of many wise and judicious men that the trotestantCtiun-h was in danger, and that the rtilei- ° ti present Ministry would never be content till he saw the Roman Catholic religion predominant in this country. Let tile Dissenters bcwrlre-Ict those who would have their Bibles unsealed, and read them with- out tear of detection, beware He begged to assure the electors that he retired from tue contest full of the warmest gratitude to t;iose who had supported him, and without the smallest particle of ill will to those who had opposed him. After the election was over, immense bodies both of Dowlais and Cvfarthfa men paraded the streets—for what purpose we could not discover, as both Air Guest and Mr Crawsbay, had, in their speeches, earnestly recomended the maintenance of the peace. It was thought tit, however, that an election farce so conducted, should maintain its con- sistency to the close, and that, as the battle had been ■fought and won by violence and intimidation, the sons of order and'civilitv"' should swell the triumph. Accordingly an immense mob—a most correct in- carnation of the virtues we have named—with the words Crawsbay and Guest, order and civility," printed on a brimstone ground, paraded the streets and illustrated the attributes thev represented throughout the remainder of the,I, v We cannot close this account without bearing our willing test.mony to the ;i(iinir:il)lc conduct of Mr Lsruce, throughout these proceedings. On his canvass lie oas received promises free, and almost spontaneous -amI he h"s 'dterwards liberated those who made t 111 11 thlei!' engagements whenever the perform- ance was ca cubited to injure their interests. His man mess, courage, and generosity, haveendcared him still more to his friends—and would, if they were of the light materials, have secured for him the esteem i o,Pd?lr^S' With Mr lsruce the conflict has Jl'™' J J %v'thout bitterness —and there is not R P iee nrs t U,iliati0n »' llis dcfclt' What tl,C "ft, nnnr ^'low |llm t() |)p sti[| is_t;le FriCIld f orbnenV°PP°nent of the Poor Law r 1 vn')i :Ukl let't ncvcr be forgotten, that it WfS lice to tl 'f ,Vo't'(> 'humanity, and to prevent any !T he'nless r> wllicl' is to oppress the aged and "r M? IV">0r\ th;,t 'be men of Dowlais and Cvfarthfa were ordered to yell him down. "##-##.6> How TO MANUFACTURE -OTES. out three thousand pounds builduj,r h r puaheram the'ratTboik^ V'T Lf rate put your Wo, kirn-if U'C^ "7 the dav of election, you i^ f° IVC V'0' °'r /]] nnnoint,. ,lnd .VOWSelt the OWIlcr of pfty well appoltlted il.ldependcl;t borollg-I¡ clctors. |i you (10 not want their servi,. ir -11 k„ ;l ./Li speculation for l s *iil be j /;«!» to iinin 1 r- enable vou, for aeon* S' \U. v )cnsive "a ,to a County votes ""MI lTc votes to'as^N'0 w' ;U'D fiitv life leases will give votes to as many Wcil wljo ^.J(, Jiougw to that extent; and, in order to secure them in ca they should leave your employ, make the voters tenants at will for the road and oar den to the house which confers the vote; this will give you a good hold over them. "'#'1' F L E CT I ON E r RIN G M E } IO R A N D A. Aii.:i;DAiii:. The electors resiling here did their duty manl^.y, and stood by their friend and neighbour. Mr Bruce, uninfluenced by the promises or threats of the Ironmasters opposed to him. They polled two to one in his fa\our, and his majority would have been increased but for the shameful neglect of the Rcis- tration List. Many votes, admitted by the Revising Barrister, were altogether omitted.' Mrs alld the Misses Bruce visited Aberdare, oil Tuesday, and were received m the most enthusiastic manner.' They werp cheered by the spontaneous outpouring of res- pect and aS-ectton: not by the hired—organized—and brutal Jiootings of an interested mob. PLRITY OF ELECI'IOX I '-The Committee of Mr Guest adopted the most liberal measures for the suc- cess of thcir liberal candidate. Thev actually polled a man twice. J he name of this person iia's louis Rowland, beer-house keeper, Pwilvwhvaid: lie voted on Tuesday, at Dowlais, and on Wednesday, at Merthyr; and had the oath been administered to him be would have swallowed it! A FviTKft L SERVANT -Ali elector came to the hustings, on Wednesday, and was asked for whom be voted. "For inymaister," said be. But who is your master? 1 i did receive a letter from Mr Ilollord, desiring me to vote for Mr Guest, so I came to vote for my maister." « Yes, but the question is, do you vote for Guest, or Bruce ? I vote for mv maister." I'bis vvas all the reply that could be elicited and the faitatul fellow s vote was not recorded. Nvill some of our numerous friends favour us with an analysis of t.ie poll tor this borough ? Whether a constituency residing in five p0Und bouses, raised, for electioneering purposes, to ten pound beer houses is the constituency contemplated by the Reform Bill do not pretend to determine, but such is a large portion of the constituency represented by Mr Guest, It was with sinjubir propriety, therefore tuat the triumphal procession was beaded bv a Dow- lais brewer. Among the missiles used bv "Evans' Legion" on Tuesday, were small iron balls, weighing more tlJan a pound padi; and among the banners was one inscribed The Iron Trad* and another, "Punt;/ of Election." We have often heard of Election Balls, but they are generally addressed to the toe, and not the head. Shakspeare speaks of "sermons in stones;" we suppose those addressed to the electors bv the tioti- electors were open air discourses, and many a bat bore witness to the fact that they were felt, By virtue of the mode in which he gained his c;I(7<tio1'" *}T is "ovv calied by Ids friends, 1 he Electurof Saxony. Not w holly lost, is the contest in London. On the contrary, we learn from the best autitoritv, that Mr Palmer's committee are already aware of so great a number of bad votes polled for the Radical cai)- didates yesterday, that they have not the least doubt of unseating Mr Grote, and of establishing Mr Palmer as the sitting member. Mr Guest is said to he so enamoured of appearing between GROTE and GULLY, In the published lists of a division, that Merthyr is intended for one of these gentlemen, should a scrutiny unseat the former or if the latter will condescend to return to Parliament — an arrangement in favour of which, Mr David James is said to have reluctantly waived his own pretensions. All this, ofcourse, assumes that MrGueat is certain of his i-eturii for ttic-cuuiity

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BRECOX, Saturday, July 29,…

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