Hide Articles List

17 articles on this Page

Advertising

FOREIGN INTELLIGENCE. .

News
Cite
Share

FOREIGN INTELLIGENCE. On Tuesday evening1 week, at seven o'clock, the Chamber of Poors delivered its judgment in the case of Meunier, Lavaux, and Laeaze. The Challllwr declares Mounier uilty of all attempt on the person of the Kins, which, according to the 86th and SSth articles of the penal code, subjects him to death as a parricide; and that punishment the Court accordingly awards a gainst him. Lavaux aud Lacaze are acquitted. in the case of Lacaze the judgment appears to be unanimous; but Lavaux escapes only through the provision of the law requiring seven-eighths of the Chamber to concur in a conviction for an actual mojoritv, namely, sixty-seveu to sixty five, voted for his condemnation. The Charte of Wednesday night contained the following paragraph, which seems to have given nearly universal satisfaction in Paris "The King has deigned to commute the punish- ment of death awarded against Meunier to transporta- tion. The President of the Court of Peers went himself to announce this intelligence to Meunier, who testified the liveliest sentiments of repentance and gratitude." ADDITIONAL PARTICULARS. Meunier, immediately after his sentence was pro- nounced, wrote to the King humbly entreating pardon in terms of the most sincere repentance. Hut, before his Petition reached his Majesty, the Council of Ministers Was considering this serious question, and the King himself had spoken in favour of commutation, considering the good sentiments the culprit several times expressed during the proceedings-in fact, the ordinance was signed before Meunier's Petition was brought to the Council. At the same moment an aged woman entered the court of the Palace, scarcely able to walk from her extreme distress of mind. She urgently entreated to be allowed to deliver a Petition to the Queen. 'Twas theunhappy mother of Meunier! The officers of the Palace received her with kindness, and immediately went to receive the Queen's orders. In a few minutes afterwards the supplicant was on her knees at the foot of her Majesty, bathing her Royal hands with tears, and praying for mercy with con- vulsive sobs. The Queen was yet uninformed of the "decision of the Council,and could only return consola- tary languagl" trembling- at the ide of giving false hopes. During this tffeetitig scene the door opened, the King was announced, ati(i*frotii, his own mouth put an end to the perplexitit-s of the Queen, by informing the mother of the culprit that the life of her son was spared. "1 have commuted his punishment," said his Majesty. "Your son has repented, and I have wished him to live. I did not wait for his petition to pronounce his pardon." As the unfortunate woman was completely embarrassed and overcome at finding herself in the presence of so much goodness, as well as grandeur, and could only reply to it with lie/ tears, the King added—" IJocomforted Your son is already acquainted with his pardon. I have just sent the President of the Court of Peers to make it known to him." The King thell raised the poor woman, who still-remained on her knees at the Queen's feet, aud seated her in an arm chair, continuing to address her in terms of consolation and benevolence. After a few minutes more their Majesties retired, recommending Madame Meunier, still oppressed with her emotions, to the care of their officers. A NEW CLAIMANT TO THE THROKF.—AT the

[No title]

EXECUTION OF GREEN A CUE.

[No title]

ITHE LAW OF CtiURClI RAn,".…

[No title]

[No title]

JMP E It IA L P A R LIA .MEiY…

[No title]

- LA TIlST JNTIL LICENCE.…

LoNDON JlUNFJY MARKET. --------…

[No title]

TO CORRESPONDENTS.

MKliTUYR TYDVJL, SATURDAY,…

[No title]

[No title]