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TO THE 1 EDITOR OF THE GAZETTE…

-. ARISTOPHANES, THE SAUSAGE…

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ARISTOPHANES, THE SAUSAGE MAKER. [The following letter has been mislaid some time; but, having found it, we readily give it insertion to oblige our kind correspondent] TO THE EDITOR OF THE GAZETTE AND GUARDIAN, Sin,—I was very much struck, the other day, in reading an excellent translation of a scene in one of the comedies of Aristophanes, which forcibly brought to mv mind the trite remark that" therc is nothing new under the sun;" for much as we have been accus- tomed, oflate, to consider the revolutions of our times in the light of new discoveries, it will appear, I think, from the condensed view which I now send vou of the comic delineation of the Athenian Satirist, that he was perfedly well versed in all the arts by which states may be overthrown, and the vilest of the people raised to power und popularity, while the virtuous and honourable are reduced to wretchedness. In the comedy to which 1 allude, the poet intro- duces a leading character of the day, who is generally supposed to be Cleon, alias the O'Council of the present day, noted for his mischievous oratory, and his enmity to the best men of the age, but without having a particle of common honesty in his own cha- racter. This worthy personage, who is represented as always on the alert to make converts, meets with a poor sausage-maker, with whom he immediately enters into conversation upon the affairs of Government, the hardships of the people, and the peculations of their rulers. The man appears at first to treat the orator rather rudely, as one who intended to laugh at a poor fello v who had other business to mind than the study of Upon this the poet very adroitly des- cribes the wheedling orator as removing this vulgar prejudice, by awakening the attention of the sausage- maker. "Behold," says he, "all these classes of society, and all the orders in the state I tell you, my friend, that you shall be their Leader and their Sovereign you shall rule the Senate, and give orders to the Gene-, rals." Wiio ^I says the wondering sausage-maker. Yes )-oil do it, "quoth the orator; "and as a. proof that I am in earnest, get upon the table where you are making sausages, and look out at the window. Do you see that world of business going on at the custom-house, and the number of vessels that are loading and unloading their merchandize See them V exclaims the man: to be sure I do: but what then ?" Why, then, I tell you that all these things shall be at your disposal; for the oracle says that vou shall be the greatest of men." How can this possibly happen ?" cries the fellow, almost out of his wits, how can I be a great man who am still but a sausage-maker, and for aught that I can find must die in that oecupation." Mv reason forjudging so is tliis," answers the ad- vocate, "that the oracle Iws so declared it, because you are both bold and wicked." But for all that, I think myself unworthy of grandeur," rejoined the fellow." "What does that signify," replied the other; do you think yourself to be a good or a bad man ?" for that matter," honestly returns the sausage-maker, "I am bad enough. "Then I give vou joy, for you will find yourself so much better qualified when you come to do your business; since our state has now no need of men of letters and principle, but must be governed by the bold, and the ignorant, the audacious, and immoral; therefore do not despise any longer what the oracles have predicted, and by which yoU are assured of the great honours that await you and persons of your description." "nut," answers the sausage-maker, now is it possible that I should be able to govern the people, not having the least knowledge of such (-,oiieeriis ?" With all the ease in the world, ray good friend, replies the orator, do oiliv what you have been used to do in your former line of business, nilx-, ilinible, disturb, and confound matters; feign, invent, any- thing to p'case and delude the rabble; and as to the rest, vou have many great talents that are proper to gain their good opinion. You have afalse tongue and a mischievous disposition: you Jove quarrelling, and are naturally cruel; besides which, as I can perceive, you are extremely obstinate, and possess no small portion of low cunning; which are all, in fact, so nianv qualities of which the Republic, at present, stands in great need and, therefore, as you have these all happily blended in your own person, no doubt can remain that in a very short time, by the application of your powers, you will be the first man in the State, though now you arc no more than a sausage-maker." Such is the picture delineated by that incomparable satirist, and the application of it to our own times will not be clittcult. I am, Sir, Yours, &c. Lanblethian, Nov. 9. R. P.

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MEHTHYR TYDVlL, SA TURDA Y,…