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FASHIONABLES, LITERATURE,…

HEXIEW OF LIT Eli A TUli E.

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GLEANINGS. ,.

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SoMXAMBUUSM.—ThefoHowmg remarkable in- stance of somnambulism is given by the Augsburgh Gazette Dresden was the threatre of a melan- choly spectacle on the 20th instant. As early as seven in the evening, a female was seen walking on the roof of one of the loftiest houses in the city, apparently occupied in preparing some ornament as a Christmas present. The house stood as it were; alone, being much higher than those adjoining it and to draw her from her perilous situation was impossible. Thqusands of spectators had assembled ibIL in the stre, ts. It was discovered to be a handsome young girl, nineteen years of a'ge, the daughter of a master baker, possessing a small independence bequeathed to her by her mother. She continued her terrific promenade for hours at times sitting on the parapet and dressing her hair. The police came to the spot, and various means of preservation were resorted to. In a few minutes the street was very thickly strewn with straw beds were called for from the house, but the heartless father, influ- enced by the step-mother of the girl refused them. Nets were suspended from the balcony of the first floor, and the neighbours fastened sheets to their windows all this time the poor girl was walking in perfect unconsciousness, sometimes gazing at the moon, and at others singing or talking to herself. Some persons succeeded in getting on the roof, but dared not approach her, for fear of the consequences if they awoke her. Towards eleven o'clock, she ap- proached the very verge of the parapet, leaned for- wards, and gazed upon the multitude beneath. Every one felt that the moment of the catastrophe had ar- rived she rose up, however, and returned calmly to the window by which she had got out; when she saw there were lights in the room, she uttered a piercing shriek, which was re-echoed by thousands below, and fell dead into the street. The scene that followed cannot be described. 1 he city on the following day was full of sorrow. The police and the father are both blamed for having left a light in the chamber. The citizens say that the police are too officious in meddling with their private affairs; they are violent against the father, as he is accused of having at- tempted to poison his first wife, and of rejoicing at the melancholy fate of her child, as he will now in- herit her property."

THE 1ROX THAUE.

LETTERS FROM ITALY.

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SCHIPTURE ILLUSTRATIONS'.—No.…

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VICE CHANCELLOR'S COURT. ..

|UMVtiKHH Y /A i II.....¡…

IFALLING IN OF A QUA RR Y,I…

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