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MEltTHYR 1YDVIL, SATURDAY,…

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MEltTHYR 1YDVIL, SATURDAY, Dec. 14, 1833 The aspect of the foreign relations of the country becomes day by day more cloudy, and from the East something like the avant couriers of storm and trouble are discernible in the poli- tical horizon. The Paris and other continental journals have for several days been sounding the alarm of war; they have dilated on the insolent conduct and mighty preparations of Russia, with the no less arrogant tone and warlike armaments of the Whig cabinet. Insults and injuries, such as the English nation never endured since the days when, under the Cabal Ministry of Charles II. it was before sold to France, and Van Tromp sailed up the Thames with a broom at his mast head, have been inflicted upon us during the Administration of Earl GREY; and, what is worse still, greatly do we question whether they have exceeded our deserts or can afford us just grounds for complaint. If a State be the artificer of its own degradation: if it have invited injuries and justified insult, the action for damages can lie only against the rulers who have abused its con- fidence, or wantonly sported with its honour, If Turkey have injured and Russia bullied us, it behoves us, before we complain of the one or retaliate upon the other, to examine how far we may have given cause of offence and invited re- prisals. The tale is, soon toldo for unhappily in these days the foreign policy of England—rather of the Whigs—is but one undeviating career of follies committed and shame achieved. t, Our readers will remember the successful rebel- lion of the Pasha of Egypt against his liege lord —his invasion of Syria-Ids victories of Konieh— his march upon Constantinople. The last of the Othmans trembled upon his throne—the empire of Mahomet tottered to its fall—another day, and the Arab of the desert, led by French renegades and excited by French intrigue, would have-j planted his banner on the topmost minaret of St. Sophia. In this crisis, and months before this crisis arrived, the Sultan prayed-not the armed in tervention which atAntwerp shed the blood of an all} all array of freebooters from St. Giles's andW apping like to those who under the sanction of Palinerstot, had laid waste the peaceful shores of the Douro anti the Tagus—-but a friendly me- diation which should, at whatever sacrifice, induce the invader to retire and restore tranquillity to his ravaged dominions. Every motive of pru- dence and policy urgently claimed compliance with this moderate requisition with Turkey we had relations of ancient friendship—a beneficial and yearly extending commerce—she was still a barrier against the ambition and the designs of the North—the Muscovite eayle was even then hovering over the perishing empire, as vultures scent afar off the putrid wreck of battle—the honour and the interest of England were alike involved—\)tit all in vain; Egypt was the sworn friend and zealous ally of Lotis PHILIPPE-by him her enterprises were abetted-and so once and again the hononr and the interests of Eng- land were prostrated to the purposes of France. Nay we h»ve it from the very, lips of Lord PADIERSTON,; in the House of Commons, for the truth of which we appeal to our Honourable Member, who must have beard him, that the Autocrat himself had urged us to mediate be- tween the. Sultan and his vassal; that the Rus- sian LegatigOtty in Loudon, had ever and again pressed it upón the Foreign Office, with an offer of all the co-operation and secondary influence of Russia Jierself in the wise and benevolent undertaking; but all were of no avail—Lord PALMBRSTON was blockading the Scheldt aud enveloped in the fogs of Holland-Turkey Was abandoned to its fate. In this his hour of agony the Sultan ap- pealed to the Muscovite—his last and sole re- source. How his fleets anchored in the Bosphorus --how his armies took possession of the forts of the Dardanelles—how Constantinople beheld at its gates and for its protection a countless an ay of Russian bayonets-how the Egyptian was stayed in his career and found it convenient to grant a peace to his panting victim at the price of his best provinces, leaving him little else than the shadow of empire—these, all these are ntai- ters of history too recent to need detail or illus- tration. The worst remains to tell. The armaments of Russia were costly, and, being for her behoof, Turkey was in justice called upon to discharge her obligation. The treasury of the-Seraglio was penury itsblf, but those who cannot in money may pay in kind. There could be no higgling about terms, for the Sultan was without a friend to aid or an ally to consult- there was not in that critical moment, there had not been for months,an English Ambassador near him—ourEnvoy to the Porte bein I)etter c ii (,,age, in gaily expending his £ 14,000 a year in the I feasts, the operas, the carnivals of Naples-tile Russian was in the poor Moslem's crlpital-the execution in his house; so he signed away his own birthright, his own independence—'twas his misfortune, but our loss and dishonour. THE DARDANELLES, by solemn treaty, WERE AGREED TO BE CLOSED, WHENEVER RUSSIA so WILLED IT, against ALL OTHEH POWERS. As no state save England has a special interest in their freedom of naviga- tion, so against England oikly was this damning clause enacted. When on the one side we cast our eyes on the French usurpation of Algiers, with its long line of Mediterranean coast—on an- other side Greece, now in reality as e're long she will be openly, a province of Russia—and lastly this arbitrary stoppage of the Bosphorus against US-it Is no difficult matter to foresee the total destruction of all our trade and best interests in the Black. Sea and the Levant. These are the blessings of Whig rule. At the date of this chapter of England's history—a page in her annals that must burn the cheek and bleitr, the eyes of every Briton to read—the Whig Lord GREY was Prime Minister; the Whigliug Lord PONSOXBY, brollier-iii-law to the Premier, was Ambassador to Turkey, receiving his pay and i quadrillion it away at Naples, as Nero fiddled whilst Rome was blazing—and Viscount PALMER- STON, the gay, the graceful, the liberal" par excellence," was Secretary fur Foreign Affairs to his Britannic Majesty. This gallant person is now, we learn, blustering and vapouring, as if Turkey heeded or K issia cared. It is not gene- rally considered of much profit to fasten the stable-door after the steed has been stolen.

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BARDIC CHAIR. ...

TO THE EDITOR OF THE GAZETTE…

CA Li Dill El Si /. UJJiO…

TO THE EDITOR OF THE GAZETTE…

TO THE EDITOR OF THE GAZETTE…

To THE EDITQR OF THE UA. JLETTB…

TO THE-EDITOR OF THE GAZETTE…

TO THE EDITOR OF THE GAZETTE…

" LO THEI EDITOR OF THE GAZETTE…

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