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THE CORN LAWS. .

LONDON MONEY MARKET.

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THE LATEST LONDON INTELLIGENCE.…

LONDON CORN EXCHANGE.

LIVERPOOL CORN EXCHANGE.

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RAIL-ROADS AND THEIR CONSEQUENCE.

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In the remarks which have beeil made on the subject of the export ot gold and silver, as tending to diminish the existing quantity in the country, one circumstance appears to have been totally over- looked-namely, the quantity that is imported. Exports are all entered at the Customs, but no such obligation rests on imports the outgoings are also noticed m the official returns, but the amount ot im- ports it is impossible to ascertain. It is hardly fair to make a bugbear of the one when a correct balance cannot be drawn of the relative transac- tions. The Custom House reports are referred to with confidence, but they only give the exports; and while people speak of the amount of specie lent out of the country, they do not appear to re- member the quantity which comes in. It is but a few days since one vessel brought specie to the value of two millions of dollars, and the American packet ships are continually supplying our stocks. Gold and silver come to England as remittances, when they answer better than other merchandize: and when they are dearer here than elsewhere they will arrive, and vice vena, like otherobjects of trade. Though money is made of them they are not money, and cowries or paper might be quite aa good a medium of commerce, if equally durably and received with equal confidence. We are neither at liberty to transform money—(the circulating medium of the country), int-o bullion, nor bullion into money of the country, and none other can be circulated here. The very idea of" gold" clings to men's minds, and on that account it is wished to keep it on the spot; but as long as our own coinage (which it is not legal to send away) does not go, why not consider it as merchandize, and in doing so bartering gold for produce in one country is the counterpart only for bartering produce for gold.in the other.. The nation which remunerates the greatest quantity of industry is the richest, and not that which possesses the largost portion of the precious metals. There can be uo greater example of this than Spain. Once in possession of the sources NylWjaod -gold and silver ara derived, so far from thír contributing to her prosperity, it has been the main cause of her decay. No circulating medium whatever can be the means of subsistence to a population, but can only be looked on as a conventional manner of facilitating trade. it is indifferent what material is used as a medium of exchange, provided it be received with public confidence. — dtp Articlt of tkc London Guardian. 1 > f' GRAB FINANCES.—In order to save a small portion of the revenue, a soorce from which this coun- try was likely to derive considerable advantages has been suddenly and unceremoniously cut off. From the year 1826, and downwards, a trade had been opened of grinding flour out of potatoes. this and other districts of the couutr), In.ilis were erected.-tbe the trade paid weU, and was rapidly eg,tendiagg to the great benefit of the districts where it was carried, on, when, in August last, an order was sent by the Board of Excise to their officers, commanding all such mills to be placed under their protection, to, pay a licence of 5/. each, aud 31d per lb. on the flour, the same as starch manufacturers. As the trade had been carried on without challenge for seven years, and a considerable capital invested in it, an order tantamount to its complete prohibition was certainly a harsh measure, and could hardly be justified by the very trifling amount of revenue which ever has been drawn from starch. The machinery is simple, and an acre of po- tatoes ground into flour paid from 121. to 151. The agriculture of the country at present certainly requires every facility of making money of its produce, and a tax which demolishes a trade altogether can never be a good one. Money, however, must be drawn to meet the national expenditure and the mobs of the great cities, having been allowed and encouraged to take the direction of what shall and what shall not be taxed into their own hands, will not fail to throw the burden of taxation on the backs of the agriculturists, for this very good reason, that, like their own sheep, they allow themselves to be shorn quiet IY --Aberdeenshire Agricultural Report.

( A CABINET CONSULTATION.…

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MERTHYR JYDVIL, SATURDAY,…

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