Hide Articles List

11 articles on this Page

Advertising

Advertising

FROM TUESDAY'S LONDON GAZETTE.

THE PROGRESS OF REVOLUTION

News
Cite
Share

THE PROGRESS OF REVOLUTION (From the United Service Gazette) It is said that when Talleyrand last returned to France, and was asked liow lie lefteiiglanct,lie replied," in full gallop to a revolution," The information upon which this positive dictum was founded could not have been sieuder, or so wily a tongue would have been less positive in its terms. The tact is that strangers, and especially such as look at its with a political eye, and hope in our ruin to find their iig- grandisement, are better acquainted with what is passing in the under current, and in the dark recesses of the political stream, than those" hose harksareforilie moment passing quietly and gaily t hrollgh the sunshme of the surface. The mass of the holders of property in this country aie ignorant of the mine preparing beneath their feet; an 1 from the repugnance which taey evince to varus any thing like information npnl1 the matter, or at least to the counter operations which alone can save them, they w l, very probably remain so until it is sprung and they are persuaded of the fact by the actuit) explosion. Nevertheless it is our duty as public journalists to point out the perils which threati n society, and though the warning remain un- heeded to the laM, we shall reiterate it again anti again- I .ie fact is, that the lower classes of our countrymen arc at t,ó1 moment passing through a demoraliz ng process winch 'ia"J1 1 the attributesofa system—that they are, in short, cated to infidelity, and all the wor-t forlDS of crime. And this is done under the permission of the Government, e in some cases where the law has vested in them the power of suppression, and in all where the nation would gladly and gratefully surrender any further authority that might be necessary for such a purpose. The extent of associa- tion now existing with the avowed object of overthrowing all the institutions of the S.ate, and especially i'-s rchS101'^ is almost incredible. We shall place before oil'rea 3 a glimpse of oue part of the Slstem. in which, however, they will be mistaken if they imagine they see the most hideous of its features. Being well-informed ourselves of the truth of many of the facts, we confirm them from the pages of a contemporary periodical of t;,e highe-t respecta- bility For some time, and especially since the audacity it acquired from the countenance of the Governmental the period of the reform agitation, the system of associa tion for purposes more or les.; secret, has been carried on to a frightful extent in all the populous towns of the em- pire. London alone contains above four hundred o't- fercnt clubs, unions, and societies, which meet weekly, collect subscriptions, and receive additional members those clubs, societies, and unions, are all eoverned and directed by initiated members from a Central Committee, who appoint and issue orders to their agents for meetings, forming new societies, and taking such measures as may be deemed advisable. The most dangerous of these sects are the persons calling themselves co operatives, w to preach as a merit aud duty the entire disruptIvll 01 society. These are tile cunning to'lowers of a wretched I who has had money to sacr:tice in the cause, but who is said to be mentally blind to the purpo. es of his pretended disciples. Their tirst operations were confined to the more susceptible materials allorded in the towns. But that is no longer the case. In order that the rural population m.ty be fitted to be their auxiliaries, missionaries have taken the field. Owen embraces thetwhole of the tnanulacturing dis tricts Carlile and the editress of the Isis lecture, through Popish Lancashire lietherington carries his iinp1'-l,c" revolutionary sentiments across the Tweed. B"t l',e Chicf organ for coinmun cating their sentiments to [the poor and the public is the unstamped papers. They have eight weekly unstamped papers, all varying in price from one penny to four pence. Those papers are numerously circulated, and edited on principles adapted to the ditferent tastes of their readers; the Christian Investiyutnr and PENNY C liillS T for the Radical who has not tinown oil the proles- sion of Christianity the rest Atheistical, Agrarian, and Owenite. These papcrsare to be found in all the lowcofiee- shops, beer-shops, and eating-houses. In many they aie left gratuitously, till habit and custom compel the proprietor to become a subscriber, that he may gratify the depraved tastes of his visitors. The supporters of these papers are not merely the lower orders; amongst thein are to be found shopkeepers, 'squires, and members of parliament. The first grand movement of tiiese agitators is agninst the Chureli but should they succceJ in producing a convul- sion through the assessed taxes and a turn out of the trades, a great point will be gained. I hey look for a demolition of the altar, in the belief that the throne is sure to follow. We know that the imputation of these mighty objects to means so apparently wretched will sound, in a country where morality and hnv have so loinr weathered in safety the storms of political strife, like timorous aud groundless alarm. Let those who think so turn their regards to what is passing in the combination of the trades, and to the results with which, m several in- stances, they have already been attended. Let not indi- viduals suppose that this is an organization of no import- ance to them-it is every day becoming more formidable; and England is at this moment threatened with a reign of terror that shall cqual that of Robespierre, Marat, aud Danton. Already the mandate, "away to the lamp-post with them" may be read in mie of these unstamped pub- lications and the Earl of E- IS threatened with dangling from a lamp-post if he lives but another year.

[No title]

CONTEMPORARY PRESS. .

Advertising

SHIP NEWS.

[No title]

FROM FRIDAY S LONDON GAZETTE.

[No title]