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FROM TUESDAY'S LONDON GAZETTE.

THE PROGRESS OF REVOLUTION

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CONTEMPORARY PRESS. .

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CONTEMPORARY PRESS. (From tne Albion.) There is a Mr. Hill, a barrister, never very much heard of we believe in Westminster Hall, who, thanks to political agitation and the Heform Bill, got into the House of Commons as one of the members tor Hull. There was lately a public dinner in Hull, at which this Mr. Hill appeared, aud made a speech, in the course ot uhich he told an anecdote in justification of himself for having voted fur the Irish Coercion Rill last Session. Tbe anecdote was this. "Some of thc Irish members who spoke with the greatest violence and voted against the Coercion Bill, were privately the zealous supporters of it, and one in particular waited upon the Ministers, and assured them that lie was under the necessity of doing what he did in the House to preserve his popularity, and that if he did not thus apeak and vote be should forfeit his seat in Parliament,which he was not at all inclined to do; but that notwithstanding his vehement public oppo- sition to the measure, he ur^ed Ministers not to bate a jilt, bllt to stick to the whole Bill if they wished It-elaiid t,) be a co-,intry fit to livo in- This anecdote Mr. Hill said he had from a gentleman pretty well known at Hull and as soon as he had said so, there arose a great try of -1 N ime, name," but Mr. Hill said he would not 9, name." Now Mr. O'Connell has taken, or affee'ed to take, very gteat ofl'ence at this anecdote, and at poor Mr. Hid, the relator thereof, and has made speeches, and written letters against both, full of (lame, and s-ifoke, and bounce—and he hurls forth charges of falsehood, calumny, fabrication, and so on, as if he were despe- rately valorous, and ready to fight with Mr. Hill (which most probably he is not.) AUo, several of his tail" have done tbe same thing, aud theie is quite an uproar about the matter, insomuch that Mr. Hill, the barrister, and M.P. lor Hull, cannot but be in a state rather uncomfortable for a patriotic and profes- sional gentleman. To "name," or not to "name"—that is the ques- tion—for Mr. Hill. The Times says he ought not to name the prudent Irish Member, who loved at once popularity, bis place in Parliament, (Iud, pCJceful possession of his properly, and acted as to him seemed best for preset vin > these iiirce, becdlbe, says t he Times, were he known, he would thereupon he slain, by Mr. OX'oiiuell's friends, the finest peasaulry." Other journalists, who take a more abstracted view of things, than he of the Times, are of opinion that jus:ice demands the publication of the name of this prudent gentleman, lest others should haply get credit for his prudence, who would lather not. Mr. O C'on- nell's taii" are in too great a state of" agitation" to say aiiytliiii, di."tinct-they are in a great rage, and foam at the mouth. But Mr. O'Connell himself says, that tbe anecdote is false, because lie knows all the Irish Members, that voted against the Coercion Bill and his u thorough conviction" is, that not one of them would have been guilty of such vile duplicity. "In their names," therefore he pronounces the charge false." ° Now we confess that, notwithstanding Mr. O'Con- nell's torrent of indignation, and notwithstanding Mr. Hill's pitiful manner ofexcusing himself for voting asit seemed to hitu right to vole in the House of Com- mons.theredopsseemtonstobeanairofverisi. militude about this anecdote that we cannot get over and we take leave to suggest that, instead of Mr. O'Connell declaring in the names of his friends, the Irish Members who voted against the Bill, the false- hood of the anecdote, each and every of these gentle- men should take the trouble of making the declaration for himself. Then we shall, indeed, have some direct evideyce, per contra, and Mr. Hill may m:ke the best he can of the prudent gentleman, whose faithful ser- vice of himself, aud his country, he has described. MR. HILL AND THE IRISII MEMBF.RS-—Mr. M. D. Hill has addressed the following communication to the Editor of the Courier — tt London, 4t, Chancery-lane, Nov. 23. SIR, I have read in the public paper* the letters ad- dressed to me in Ireland, the proceedings at a public meet- ing in Dublin, and the comments on my speech to the electors of Hull. If any Member of Parliament addresses to me a private letter 011 the subject, I consider him enti- t < to au immediate reply, and he will receive from me an explicit answer whether he is, or not, the individual I referred to 011 that occasion. I am, tir, &c. H M. D. HILL."

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FROM FRIDAY S LONDON GAZETTE.

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