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FASHIONABLES, LITERATURE,…

OX THE COMMERCE Of FRANCE…

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-----------------F ~ WEANINGS-…

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F WEANINGS- SCANDALOUS MISTAKE —Lord Brougham's motto is Pro Rege, Lege, Grege1'-— (For the King, the Laws, and the People.)—Some mischievous wag has altered the punctuation, as follows :—" Pr° has altered the punctuation, as follows Pro Rege, lege Grege'—(For the King, read the People." enemy hath done this." Pi S'rIXG FlloM FRANKFORT TO BRESLAU.-—' Ale-houses are abundantly scattered, and no pos- tillion drives a stage, without stopping to enjoy a schnapps (the goutte of the French postillion)—VV ho can resist the temptation, when all ale-house, instead of a sign-post, hangs out a board, with the seducing salutation, « IVillkommen mein Freund"—welcome, my friend! The posting itself is infamous, not so much after you are on the road, as before getting on it; you may reckon on waiting at least an hour for horses. At Spottau, after considerably more than an hour had expired, three starved horses tottered up to the carriage, one led by an old woman, another by a little girl, and the third by a lame hostler and notwithstanding all this, you are pertinaciously attacked for <i expedition money." It was Sunday morning, and men, women, and children, were seated or stretched in the sun, before their doors. Why don t you go to Church ?" I called to a young, white- headed rogue^ wj10 was basking himself, apparently half asleep, along a stone bench. 1 have no time, was the reply and he turned himself again to his repose.—RusseWs Tour in Prussia. BELLS.—-FHE following are the weights of the principal bells in Europe lbs. impress Anne's, Moscow 432,000 Boris Godinuf's, ditto 28f~t,000 Novogorod Great Bell 70,000 Amboise Bell, Rouen 40,000 "lCnna Bell, cast from Turkish cannon 40,200 Erfurt, Prussian Saxony 30,000 Great Tom of Oxford 18,000 St. Paul's, London 11,400 Ghent, Flanders 11,000 Great Torn of Lincoln 10,400 Worcester Great Bell 6,600 York Great Bell 6,600 Gloucester Great Bell 6,000 Paulinus, Bishop of Nola in Campania, was the first who introduced bells into ecclesiastical service about the year 400. DISPATCH.—The girls in America are beautiful and uiiitfected: perfectly frank, and, at the same time, perfectly modest; but, when you make them an ofl'er of your hand, be prepared to give it, for wait they will not. In England we frequently hear of courtships of a quarter of a century in that anti malthusian country, a quarter of a year is deemed to be rather 11 tell, thy. Cobbelt. BAKER'S CHRONICLE.—A person was lamenting the turn out of the Paris bakers and asked, in case their example should be followed by their brethren in Ehgland, whether we couldn't proceed against them. "To be sure, replied a wag, "in Rolls Court," A QUALIFICATION.—A merchant lately adver- tising for a clerk" who could bear confinement," re- ceived an answer from one who had been seven years in qaoi. THE VALUE OF WATER.—An American farmer, in the course of a long article on the treatment of cows, mentions the following circumstance, which strikes us as being worthy of the consideration of farmers and those who keep cows :—" And let us re. mark, that good water is as essential to good milk yielding as good pasture. We had a cow last summer that jielded five gallons of rich milk a day. She ran in a tolerable pasture, but there was a spring of pure fresh water running through it: we also kept salt constantly within her reach. The same cow this summer in a much better pasture does not yield three gallons of milk; the reason of this falling off is, that she is supplied with water from a pump, occasionally, when her attendants conceive she wants it, not when she feels she wants, which is a great point—she also gets salt as it happens.'—In good cheese and butter making districts of this country the cows are well supplied with good water as well as grass ROMANTIC CASE.-In the Exchequer Chamber, on Friday, Mr. H.Twiss opened the case of Russell r, Turley- He said that Mrs. Russell, before her marriage with Mr. Russell, lived in the family of Mr. Burge, an eminent optician in Piccadilly, and on her marriage 100ul. Navy 6 per cents, belonging to her was transferred to Mr. Burge in trust for herself for life, and at her decease for the benefit of her daughter; the interest to be paid to the piainliff for life. Mr. Burge, the trustee, died in 1819, a short time after he had executed this deed. Mrs. Burge came into pos- session of all his property, and the plaintiff, although her niece, could never obtain the. deed from her, nor any acknowledgment that money was due to her, but 2M. were doled out to her expressly by way of favour. In 1823 Mrs. Burge was married to Mr. Turley, and j in 1832 she died. The deed then in a most extraor- dinary manner made its appearance. An old shop- man to Mr. Burge. named Allen, produced the docu- ment, and related that the day after Mr. Burge's death he and Mrs. Burge were in a room examining two chests, when Mrs. Burge took the deed, which was in a box, and told him to burn it, adding that she had sent the servant out, and that she had made a fire for roasting in the kitchen. Allen then wrapped up the deed in some paper, and went into the kitchen, where he was followed by Mrs. Burge. Allen then threw the brown paper in which the deed had been enclosed into the fire, but secreted the deed itself. Mrs. Burge then stirred the fire, and said, as it flamed up, Now I am happy." The deed remained in the possession of Allen till the death of Mrs. Burge, when he deli- vered it to Mrs. Russell. Mr. Treslove, for Mr. Turley, said his client knew nothing of the circum- stances which had been stated He made very slight opposition to the reception of the deed. The hand- writing of Mr.Burge and the genuineness of the deed having been proved, Lord Lyndhurst decreed for the plaiutiff, and, under the circumstance, with costs. NOYEL AND DANGEROUS KIND OF IMPOSITION. —On Friday, a woman, numed Boyle, was sentenced to sixty day's confinement in Bridewell, for, obtaining moneyjand goods from servants by a mode of which we have never before heard, but which we are sorry is but too likely to succeed in cunning hands, if not properly guarded against. It appeared that she had been in the habit of calling at certain houses, and taking one of the servant girls aside, whom perhaps she had never seen before, whispered to her that she wanted a bottle,a gown, or other piece of property, or perhaps a piecc of money. The servant would likely stare with astonishment at her demand, but on re- fusing it, is met by the threat, that if she did not comply, her master and mistress will be told of the last articles she had given away. The fears of the girl have been sometimes so operated upon, that although as honest as may be, they have, tu prevent even the "uspicion of guilt in the minds of their superiors, which in their eyes would likely be the case by a charge brought against them in the manner threatened, actually become guilty, and made free with the property of their masters, giving It to this audacious Jezebel, who will perhaps return next day, or as often as she pleases after that, and now with some ground for her threat of information, will obtain article after article, until the girl is dismissed for dis- houesty and her character rendered worthless. On Thursday, had calIed uPon a ser™»t girl in Forih-street in the manner described, but who, con- scious of her innocence, allowed her to carry her to carry her threat of informing her mistress into effect and afterwards had her apprehended by the polie- when she met with the award we have men_ tioned Unfortunately, every girl has not the spirit of the one in question, and many of them allow them- selves to be g'u\led and misled, thoughtlessly and foolishly enough, though too successfully; but after this caution we should hope that this species of im- position will be guarded against, and meet with that determined resistance which influenced the girl in Foi-th-strect.- Glasgou, Courier. MOST DISGRACEFUL AND REVOLTING OUTRAGE. -NEW Ross, Nov. 5.-Yesterday a scene was pre- sented here which would be looked on with abhor- rence by the most uncivilized savages in the interior of Africa. A large party, accompanying a funeral from Carrickshock, in the county Kilkenny, had proceeded as far as Rosbercon, where some dispute arising as to the place where the corpse was to be interre'd the coilin was laid down on the bridge while the boys" were adjusting the matter with their shillelahs. In the mean time the bridgeman had closed the gates. But a strong party, having replaced the coffin on the bearer, rushed on, and having forced the gates open, proceeded through the principal streets of the town with the most sa- vage yells and.shouting, and brandishing their sticks, in token of triumph. Two ot the ringleader, were secured, and brought to the Sovereign's Office, where they were fined for the offence; besides having to pay the expences of the court, attornies, &c. Having passed through the town in the manner already described, they stopped at a public-house in the outskirts, where they spent an hour or up- wards, leaving the colbn in the middle of the street. —Waterford Mirror,

- UNIVERSITY JJS TELLlUKiWE,'…

" i^ |l[ THE MARKETS.J !

U .DUiCU VEH Y OF A HOMICIDE.…

HORRIBLE MURDER. ..

SHIPWRECKS. -0.

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SCKi fi'UIiE ILLUSTRATIONS.…

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-i' ----FBOM FRIDAY S LONDON…

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