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MERTHYR 7YDVIL, SATURDAY,…

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MERTHYR 7YDVIL, SATURDAY, Nov. 23, 1833 From the commencement of our labours, our readers will do us the justice to remember that we have kept a careful watch over the appear- ances of the times that we have eagerly availed ourselves of every occasion for sustaining the sinking hopes and reanimating the drooping spirits of the inhabitants of the three important Counties whose interests we are more peculiarly charged with guardiiig that we have hastened to commu- nicate glad tidings to our friends when our own faith was sufficiently satisfied of their correctness i and therefore it is with the greater satisfaction that we revert to the general tenor of our local notices this day and for some time past, in proof that mining, manufacturing, and trading concerns are assuming a more healthy appearance. Would that we were enabled to afford the same consoling assurance to our agricultural friends; neverthe- less although yet unable to pronounce any decided improvement in their condition, we are disposed to entertain a confident expectation that the increased well-being of their neighbours will ere long react upon themselves, and that the climax —the Rubicon—of their misfortunes may in any case be regarded as passed. When present appearances are contrasted with the gloom and despondency whicb pervaded the whole of Glamorgan Monmouth and Brecon at this precise period of the past year that we commenced our labours, it will not perhaps be imputed as vain glorious in us to assert, that whatever and however humble its merit or its pretensions, the GAZETTE AND GUARDIAN has ap- proved itself far other than a bird of evil omen Slightly to allude to the state of one portion only of our influential constituency—one district only of the three counties—such as we found it in the last really gloomy November; Merthyr was a prey to all the ills with which paralized indtistry) aggravated if not absolutely caused by political convulsion, can afflict a community. Emigration became a consequence of rioting, and thousands abandoned the place in despair in search of peaceful spots where their industry might be more advantageously exercised, or their property better respected and less in danger. Merthyr presented, in truth, a sorrowful spectacle. care on the brow and anxiety in the heart of all who had any thing to lose, whilst the former hale, honest and cheerful countenances of our operative brethren were but too generally ex- changed for lowering looks of discontent and the signs too visible of political and party fury. The operations of trade were suspended among the Shop-keeping interest; works were blown out by the Ironmasters; workmen were cast upon the parish for bread. Amidst the universal deso- lation political Onions and political Pretenders seemed alone to flourish whilst local Journals, which should have been first and foremost in aid of the law of the land and the institutions of the brian," from the principles which had before honourably distinguished them, to run riot with the disaffected, to prate about reform with all the vehemence of old age conscious alike of impo- tence and imbecility, and not of mind sound enough to distinguish between Reform and Revo- lution. Such was the November 1832. Even amidst lite gloomy perspective we detected indications of a more prosperous future, faint perhaps in the outline as the fires of Mcrthyr reflected a hun- dred times from hill to hill and cloud to cloud afar off, but not less sure signs than these to the traveller of his nearing the great Vulcanian forge of the world. This conviction we ex- pressed in the Prospectus which preceded our appearance this conviction we boldly justified by planting the banner of the GAZETTE and GVARDIAN even in the centre of dreary Mertiryr, and at once linking our own fortunes with the future weal or woe of Glamorgan, Monmouth and Brecon. If, on our own account, we rejoice in the pros- perous issue of our adventure—if, with a pardon- able exultation, we may be allowed to advert to the unparalleled success of the GAZETTE and GUARDIAN now diffused far and wide, and in one short year overtopping and superseding Journals of twenty or thirty years standing—not the less unfeignedly and fervently do we hail the chang- ing appearances of the three Counties, and of Merthyr, which we have assumed as the basis and point of our comparison. Now, we have the grateful task of recording in our columns weekly, an advance in the values of his mineral manufac- tures to the master, or in wages of his labour to the workman works are again blown in that had been thrown out of blast—others whose completion had been long stayed and entire abandonment contemplated,are oncemore in course of preparation; Rail-roads and other enter- prises on a mighty scale are in contemplation immigration has succeeded to emigration—our operative brethren return in search of employ- ment which is not long to seek the retail trader finds his wares more readily to disappear and his money returns more surely to pour in from cheer- ful customers, whilst the Bristol and Manchester riders, with their Groceries and Cottons, receive their share of the benefit in increased orders, and more punctual payment. Such is a picture, not overcharged, of the present appearance of Merthyr; hope has succeeded to despondency, and the amelioration has been so gradual and progressive as to aftord the best guarantees for its durability. We may not indeed look for the return of what Mr. COBBETT fitly terms prosperity prices;" iron at £16 per ton, may we fear, be regarded as an Utopian dream but there are the fairest grounds for trusting that prices will ultimately settle at that just point which shall remunerate the capitalist and allow the means of comfortable subsistence to the labourer. More slowly, but we trust not less surely, the agricultural interests of South Wales will participate in the advantageous position i f the mining and manufacturing, and the results of several of the late fairs serve to confirm us in our anticipation. Much of the improvement visible is clearly attributable to the subdued tone of party feeling amongst us. People are beginning at length to understand that political agi'ation has been originated and kept up solely that the division of some one hundred and fifty thousand pounds a year of the public money among the GREYS may be masked by it. They are pre- pared therefore to anticipate that some new scheme of reform and confusion is hatching, in order that the DURHAM breed may be fattened at the public charge, or that Lord BROUGHAM may be entitled to remove from the Court of Chancery, where there is work to do which he is too idle or incapable to perform, to the Treasury where less labour is required, all the while pre- serving intact his £ 14,000 a year and his retiring pension of £ 5,000. The battle is really between the GREYS and the DURIIAMS on the one side, and the BROUGHAMS on the other; these are the spoilers who will seek, for the purposes of am- bition and covetousness, to throw the country again into convulsion, that so they may plunder with more impunity. These are the objects for which, and which only, Corn Laws are denounced Church reforms proclaimed—the abolition of Poor Laws and the starvation of the poor pro- jected, and the first openly advocated—jobs in the shape of Corporation Charters concocted. If the people, with their woful experience of the direful consequences of political agitation, again give into the snare, then are they really deserving of all the miseries, past and prospective, endured or in store for them. Whether we are to be pillaged under the quackery of Reform, by the interminable brood of GREYS and DURHAMS, or the less numerous kinsfolk of the BROUGHAM tribe, is a matter of comparative indifference to all, pro- vided the course of our industry and the harmony of our lives be not interrupted by their broils. We care little which of these is minister, we are even disposed for the sake of tranquillity to tolerate the quartering of another bevy of Greylings, so that our industrious pursuits be not interfered with, aud wa be left to repose beneath the shade of the institutions under which our ancestors grew rich, great, and powerful. This we fear is not to be our lot, but there is on that account the more reason for the people to do their duty as we will do ours. We shall be found, as heretofore, in the front of the battle, defending the rights of the poor. and the poor laws; the declared foes of low prices and low wages the earnest advocates of the corn laws and the farming interest; the humble and zealous defenders of those institutions under which we ceased to flourish only as our progenitors before us had done, when the spoiler and the revolutionist were allowed to lay unhallowed hands upon them. In- dustry can only prosper with internal peace content and happiness are never found with Civil broils. We throw out these hints for the use of the public; a deadly struggle is going on in the Ministry—the rogues are falling out, so look to it all-

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