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(Co THE SUGAIi TRADE-

-----_-----INDIA. AND CHINA…

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TO THE EDITOR OF THE MERTHYR…

EAST INDIA HOUSE.

THE BANK QUESTION. -

AGRICULTURE, COMMERCE AND…

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THE————————— LATEST LONDON…

BAIL COURT, JU-E- 8.

COURT Oi KING'-S-BENCH, JUNE…

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....-LOJS'DON MONEY MARKET.…

LONDON PRICES OF STOCh.

MERTHYR 7 YDVIL, SATURDAY,…

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MERTHYR 7 YDVIL, SATURDAY, June 15,1833. His Majesty's Ministers, in acceding to the pro- posal of the West India body as to the increase of the compensation to be awarded to them, have acted with a degree of political wisdom, for which we cheerfully give them the deserved meed of applause. We consider this concession highly to he prized, not only as an endeavour to reconcile conflicting parties, and a tribute totlie dictates of justice, but as denot ing- an inclination, in the future conduct of the great measure in hand, to listen to information given by those who have from experience some knowledge of that portion of the empire which is affected by it. Much as the advocates of Emanci- pation must rejoice that the fiat has gone forth," we conceive there is not one of them but must be sensible that the difficulties of the subject are now only going to begin. It is a well known fact that the sense in which the negroes understand the word Emancipation is literally incompatible with that which his Majesty's Ministers, and Mr. BUXTON, Mr. STEPHENS, Admiral FLEMING, and Lord SUF- FI ELD attach to it. The persons upon whom this mea- sure is to operate, 800,000 individuals, of the lowest grade, intellectually speaking, in wl.:eh the human race has been found, are suddenly lifted from the foot to the highest stpp of he political ladder: at the same time their definition of the word Emanci- pation is derived, not from any conception of inde- pendence springing from, or connected with industry, but from the only state of things that is before their eyes—a class of freemen living in opulence with little or no exertion. Not to dwell upon partial collisions produced by the revenge or hatred of these men towards their masters (all evil which we fear the civil power will find not easy to correct), it will require every exertion of wise and watchful legislation to infuse into them that triumph over indolent propensities, that just sense of the happiness acquired by useful industry, wilhout which the boon conferred upon them will be any thing but a blessing. Upon the due performance of this great task of political conversion depends the question, whether the negroes shall in a short time become the victims of want, and, through want, of crime in all its forms or whether they shall be by this measure of Emancipation elevated to that point in the scale of humanity, which it is the sanguine wish of the Emancipists that they should attain. Upon this depends the question whether the British Colonies shall remain to the mother country a spling of wealth and in arm of strength, or whether we shall see our shipping, our commerce, our trade, and the employment and subsistence of a large proportion of our industrious countrymen rapidly crumble away. For success in this, as in all other endtavours that have good for their object L, we must lay the foundation in the right place, and m we must lay it deep. As we have before said, if a pious and enlightened teacher of the Christian Gospel had been thirty years ago invited to reside on every large estate in the western colonies, the mind of the people, to whom this great political experiment is now to be applied, would by this time have been ripened for the change. What in this sense has been too long neglected, it is wise now to lose no time in doing- We say wise, not only as speaking with a due estimate of spiritual blessings, but even in the worldly sense of the term Political Wisdom. The colonies not only have been a mine of wealth and a tower of strength to the mother country but in the loss of them under our present circumstances, our industrious classes will suffer unspeakably more than we suffer already from the national debt. It is quite delusion to suppose that the colonies will remain, at least that they will remain at all productive to us now, uuless habits of industry and propriety of conduct are instilled into the negro population but it is a far greater delusion to suppose that these habits can ever be inculcated but by beiiinning at tiie beginning, and by implant.. ing deeplv, and without allov, the principles of that Christian Revelation, which alone has converted man from the mere creature of instinct that vege- tates in pagan lands, to the civilized, intelligent and upright member of British society. But there are temporal exertions immediate, necessary, and which weshall he wanting in the duty of diligence if we do not make. To the clouded and untaught minds of the negro race there is perhaps no sentiment of propriety equally iineiiigioie, and likely to be successfully cultivated, as that of jus- tice in all things between man and man: and if it be intended to promote Emancipation, with the solid advantages which are supposed to be annexed to tilt, name, the earnest attention of the legislature must be applied to Divine means for the inculcation of sound Christian doctrine, and to enforce a practical observance of the rules of justice. In the successful pursuit of these objects much may be done by the cordial cooperation of the government with the colonial proprietors; and they are objects for which no pecuniary price that can be named is above their >mp«rtance. We have not thought it necessary to alter th. foregoing remarks, although, as our readers will perceive by our Parliamentary Report, the We^t India Question may be considered as all but finally arranged. Mr. STANLEY'S resolutions, in THE amended form announced in tiie GAZETTE AND GUARDIAN of last week exclusively, have passed the House of Commons. So correct, as well as exelu- she indeed was our information, that not a single London journal was in possession of it until after its publication at Merthyr and the arrival of our paper in London.

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LONDONTXTRN EXCHANGE, JUNITTO.…

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