Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

11 articles on this Page

GENERAL ELECTION, 1900. --

rrovr sTTDETJb MAXTT 3*IVE.

j GENERAL ELECTION, 1900.

FOILED AGAIN.

Advertising

TOWN HALL, RHYL.

[No title]

Advertising

CYCLING NEWS & GOSSIP. II

News
Cite
Share

CYCLING NEWS & GOSSIP. II It is really wonderful that there are so many men who show themselves blind to the interests not only of themselves but of the snort at large, by scorching through parks and grounds in regard to the use of which special permission has been given. A burst of speed upon an unfrequented highway is all very well, but when a man puts his head down and scorches through a lovely park which has been thrown open to the une of cyclists by its owner simply that they may en joy the good road and beautiful scenery, one's feelings may reasonably get somewhat ruffled. On some park gates there are fixed notices which should make an ordinary cyclist almost ashamed of his sport- y notice of warning to scorchers and such-iike. Of course there are black sheep in every flock, but these men who abuse privileges and bring the sport into disrepute are a pest in the society of cyclists. A case in point is that which a lady of title has, in self-defence, had to put down patches of stones on a road leading through her park in North Lon- don, but which road she can apparently only close after certain hours. Cyclists have from time to time made complaint to the N.C.U. in regard to the bad cycling surface in this particular stretch, and the Union in due course took the matter up, only to find that the action of the lady in question was quite justified as the only practical means by which the road could be saved from conversion into a race ground. Of course the innocent have to suffer for the guilty and get through as best they can. There was a meeting of giants at the Pare de Princes track, Paris, on a recent Sunday, when some of the finest professional racing men assembled to compete in a 100 kilometres paced rnce. Amongst the men were Huret, who figured prominently as the recent winner of the 100 kilo- metres world's championship; A. E. Walters, holder of the 24 hours world's record; E. Taylor, ex-holder of the hour world's record, and A. A. Chase, the holder of the world's mile record from ,T standing start, and the British hour record. JInret was the fancied man, but that grand rider Walters, on his Dunlop tyred safety, rode a most careful race and ultimately won amidst great excitement. Judging by the "list of stolen machines" which weekly appears in the columns of the trade papers and similar announcements, bicycle steal- ing seems to be on the increase. This new form of thieving is hardly likely to diminish until the task of disposing of them is made more difficult, and greater care is taken by cyclists themselves in leaving the machines unattended, or insecure out- side shops, inns, private houses etc. No matter how short a time a call mav take, the machine should never be left to the mercy of the cycling thief, for if such a one happens to be on the spot and on the look-out, a few moments suffice for him to make up his mind, mount, and be out of sight, and—what is more—practically secure from pur- suit. Steal on, steal on, cry the members of the cycle- pilfcring fraternity and steal on they do From north to south and east to west come complaints of missing cycles. In this, cyclists themselves are partly to blame for leaving their machines unat- tended by the kerb or places of call, thus practi- cally inviting the miscreant to proceed further in his pernicious profession. When brought to book the cycle thief receives no mercy from the bench, many of the recent sentences given being severe enough, one would have imagined, to act as a warning to restrain others from continuing the practice; but on it goes, and the police seem powerless to stay its progress. There must be many places where thieves may easily dispose of their stolen property, and here it is that the police ought to seek. No doubt many dishonest agents, finding their legitimate business unprofitable, have resorted to buying these machines at a very low figure, altering the frames beyond recognition, and selling them at a considerable profit. Very soon the financial year of many cycle firms will be drawing to a close and managers will l,e concocting the balance sheets so that they may appear favourable in the eyes of their shareholders; but what ingenuity may be exercised in this res- pect will he of little avail. The worm of bad trade will be found winding its way throughout the figures, and shareholders will receive small, if any dividends. This unfortunate state of affairs is ascribed to keen competition, low prices all round, a bad season, and the universal scape-goat, the war. This may be true to a certain extent, but the real cause of the evil may be traced to the phenomenal growth of the cycle trade some six or seven years ago. It may be likened to a grape vine throwing its branches out in all directions with thousands of bunches of grapes as the grapes grow the root proves too weak to withstand the strain, and bunch after bunch fall off until only those which the vine can properly yield remain, but these too will have suffered though they reach maturity. There are too many members of the cycle trade, and until some fall out it will never be in a nourishing condition. Harrv Green, of the Silverdale C.C., well known as one of the best unpaced riders of the day, has, on his Dunlop tyred safety made another success- ful attempt on a place-to-p]ace record, viz., London to Liverpool, which he covered unpaced. in exactly 11 hours. The distance is 202 miles, and it will be seen that Greeu must have moved along at a tidy pace, more especially as the pre- vious record was made with the assistance of motor pacing by W. J. Neason, who occupied 11 hours 43 mins. on the journey. London has a new central electric railway, which runs between Shepherd's Bush, on the out- skirts of the city, and the Bank of England, and cyclists are availing themselves of the new system to a very considerably growing extent. Men who live out in the country beyond Shepherd's Bush now cycle to the station, leave their machines in the cloak room, and go by train up to the city, thus having a comtortaoie, eaSyi ând quick ride over a stretch which was before fraught with considerable danger and discomfort.. It is said that the average number of cycles left at the Shep- herd's Bush station totals no less than fifty, and no doubt when the scheme is raore known the • railway company will have to provide fuller accommodation. Indeed it will be distinctly to their interests to encourage the new departure. )

[No title]

Advertising