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COLWYN BAY.

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that it was a very good movement. Drilling young men had a tendency to teach them self- respect. President Kruger or the German Emperor, if they came over, would have a warm reception, but they must keep their powder dry and have plenty of Volunteers. The movement also had a tendency to keep young men from the ale-house. If the Council granted it free, they would not lose anything.—Mr Pierce also favoured the grant, which was allowed on payment for gas and cleaning. MR SCHOFIELD AND THE ROYAL OSBORNE MINSTRELS' GRAND CONCERT NEXT FRIDAY.— At the Public Hall, next Friday evening, June 5th, Mr Schofield and the Royal Osborne Minstrels are giving a grand concert (new programme) which has been very appropriately spoken-of as "A Galaxy of Talent in the Acme of Minstrelsy." A very novel and up-to-date Sketch will be given, entitled "Photography at a Discount, or the New X Rays." MAELOR WELSH COSTUME CHOIR CONCERT.— A grand concert was given, at the Welsh Wesleyan Chapel, Colwyn, on Whit-Monday, by the Maelor Welsh Costume Choir. The Chapel was fairly well filled, and the singing par excellence. The Chairman was Mr Hugh Davies (Ferndale) and the conductor, the Rev T. C. Roberts, Colwyn Bay. The Choir were assisted by Miss Parry (" Telynores Lleifiad "), harpist. The first portion of the programme opened with the Chorus Let the hills resound," by the Choir. Mr Henry Davies sang The Diver with com- mendable effect. Miss Carrie White sang Dreams of Childhood." The quartette Nos Galan," by the Abon Quartette Party. Miss Jennie Parry, upon being introduced by the Con- ductor, was warmly applauded, the harp solo being "The Smile" (encored). After the part- song" Sweet and Low" had been given by the Choir, the trio "My little Countess" was so capitally rendered, the refrain Tra la la" being taken up most enthusiastically by the audience, that an encore was demanded and acceded-to by the singing of "Clychau Aberdyfi," the Choir winding up the first part ot the programme with 0 hush thee, my baby." The second part opened with a pianoforte solo by Miss Marsh. The Comrades' Song of Hope was lacking in spirit and fire, but was nevertheless well received. Mr Arthur Davies gave an excellent rendering of The Bugler," and scored a success. Miss Emily Wright brought home a good point with the song 0 na b'ai Llewelyn," the Choir follow- ing with a capital rendition of The Summer." Miss Jennie Parry's harp solo, II Papagalo," took immensely, finishing up with a selection of Welsh Airs. The Male Voice Quartette sang On the banks of Allan Water," and really this was a capital performance Miss Gwenfron Jones pleased her audience with "Alone on the Raft," and received her share of the plaudits. Mr D. E. Ellis sang The Star of Bethlehem," and this was a treat but the greatest treat of all (or what seemed to be so. from the great cheering) was the chorus Now the concert is all over," and this was really good. The concert was brought to a close with Hen Wlad fy Nhadau." The The proceeds went in aid of the Chapel funds. GENTLEMAN JOE COMPANY AT COLWYN BAY.—By referring to our advertising columns it will be seen that for the first time Colwyn Bay is to be favoured by the appearance of Gentle- man Joe," the Handsom Cabby. The Company, which is under the personal supervision of Mr E. G. Falcon, will give a performance at the Public Hall, on Thursday next, June 4th, at eight o'clock. The musical comedy which has had such a long and successful run in London we hope may prove a success in Colwyn Bay. It will be remembered that on several occasions Mr Falcon has visited Colwyn Bay, and that never yet has he provided anything but good fare for his patrons. TEACHERS' GUILD OF GREAT BRITAIN AND IRELAND (NORTH WALES BRANCH, COLWYN BAY CENTRE).—The first general meeting ot members was held, at the Constitutional Club, Colwyn Bay, on Saturday, May 23rd, Mr William Cogswell in the chair. The proceedings were of an interesting character, and assumed the form of a discussion upon "The Respective Advan- tages of a Classical and of a Modern Education." The openers in favour of a Classical Education, were the Rev. J. H. A-.tley, M.A., of Colwyn Bay, and Mr R. M. Hugh Jones, M.A., of Rhyl, whilst the cause ot the Moderns was championed by Mr C. Hiatt and Mr J. Wood, of Colwyn Bav. Other speakers followed, including Mr T. G. Osborn, M.A., J. P., of Colwyn Bay, Miss Mercier, of Rhyl, and Miss Hovey, B.A., of Colwyn Bay, and, although no practical outcome was to be expected from an academical dis- cussion of this nature, yet the papers that were read and the speeches that ensued, indicated a very warm interest in the subject. The audience was not confined to members of the teaching profession, although mainly composed of ladies and gentlemen having connexion with schools in Colwyn Bay, Rhyl, Llandudno, and Conway. At the close of the discussion, various schemes were considered for the utilisation of a very substantial donation with which Miss Barlow is entrusted, and which is proposed to be in some way applied for the benefit of members of the Guild who may be requiring a period of rest. After the meeting, those who were present were entertained at Coed Pella by Miss Barlow. THE AFRICAN STUDENTS' ENTERTAINMENT.— The African Students held an entertainment at the Public Hall, on Whit-Monday, when the following capital programme was gone through -Pianoforte duett, Miss Lily Brackstone and friend song, True, till death," Mr John Llewelyn Roberts (Fern Bank); jubilee solo, Mr Washington Seahfa (African Student) song, A dream of Paradise," Miss C. F. Ward; solo, Voice of the Ocean," Mr J. O. Davies African hymn, The Students recitation, Hanging a picture," Mr A. Clegg (encored); jubilee solo (chorus), The African Students recitation Building of Saint Sophia," Mr A. Clegg; Ca- meroon solo, Mr S. Dibundu (African Student) song, "Give me thy love," Miss C. F. Warr; solo, Revenge," Mr J. Llewelyn Roberts song, Lead, kindly Light," Mr J. O. Davies; recitation, "Bishop and Caterpillar," Mr David E. Greenfield solo, Star of Bethlehem," Miss Nellie Ann Roberts Congo hymn, The African Students. The proceeds were in aid of the Congo Institute. A SERVICE-OF-SONG.-The members of the English Baptist Band of Hope rendered the service- of-song entitled "Her Benny," on Thursday evening, May 21st, at the English Baptist Church. The chorus consisted of about 120 children, while the connective readings were given by Miss Owen (Board School). The scene opens in Liverpool, where Nelly Bates (a little match-seller) is crouched in the shadow of St Georges' Church, waiting for the return of Benny (her brother), but, although he had promised to be with her at four o'clock, the Town Hall Clock had struck five; nevertheless, at last he came, and they had both bad luck, but his luck changes, and soon he is the possessor of half-a-bob, and he buys hot taters for Nelly. The chorus "Remember the Poor" was sweetly sung by the' children. The next portion of the connective reading told about Benny's home, where the brutality of the father is witnessed. The hymn No night shall be in heaven," was again sung by the children. The morning came, and Nell and Benny left their home early, and then fell on their ears the hymn Lord, Thy children guide and keep they fell in with Joe Wray, the Night-watchman, who found them lodgings at a penny a night at Betty Barker's. The children sang Little acts of kindness." Christmas-Day came on a Wednes- day, and during the previous days Benny did a roaring business. It was later than usual when they got home on Christmas-Eve, and Betty had got a bigger fire than usual, and had got them a cup of hot cocoa each, and some bun-loaf to eat with it. "I do wish folks 'ud 'ave Christmas every week," said Benny. It was at this time that Betty found out their ignorance, so, taking down from a shelf her big and much-worn Bible, she opened it at the second chapter of Matthew, and read verses on the birth of Christ. The children sang "I love to hear the story" very effectively, the next chorus being Safe within the veil." Then came Nelly's accident, she was taken to the hospital, and there she died, and, two days afterwards, she was laid to rest in the Cemetery,—only two mourners stood by the grave, Benny and Joe, but they were mourners indeed. Peacefully sleep was then sung, and this was a capital rendition, the ral and dim at the end of the refrain being really most effective. Poor Benny felt sad for weeks after Nelly's death, and one cold day, as he was waiting the boat in, to carry someone's bag, he noticed a gentleman with a portmanteau in one hand and a little girl in the other, and then muttered, "Well now, ain't that curious,-if that ain't the very gent whose portmantle I carried the night before father wolloped me I'll try my luck," but he got a short answer. Benny was turning away sad, when he felt a touch on his arm, and, turning round, he saw the little girl he had seen on the boat, who said Don't think pa is unkind because he spoke cross to you, he has been annoyed, here is a shilling." 0 my," said Benny, I wonder if she were an angel. Nelly said the Lord ud provide." Some time after, as Benny was walk- ing along the street, he was arrested by the sound of a childish voice singing "Love at Home," (this being capitally sung by a dot of the name of Ethel Davies). The little singer was Eva Lawrence, the daughter of a well-to-do man-of- business, and, approaching the window, she saw our hero, and Benny saw his angel, and, in response to Eva's wish, Mr Lawrence took Benny into his employment. He was. getting on very well, when, owing to a five-pound note being missing, and suspicion falling on poor Benny, he lost his situation, but he spoke the truth. The children now sang Speak the Truth." He was at liberty, it was true, but alas, his innocence had not been established, and his little angel believed him to be a thief. The next piece by the Choir was Father, take my hand." That night Benny slept on little Nelly's grave, and the folowing morning he resolved to commence anew after two days tramping, he felt sick, and a group of haymakers supported him, when Farmer Fisher came up, and he sent for Mrs Fisher, who was a good kind-hearted woman who soon brought Benny to. Six years passed away, Benny lived with the tanner, and not far from the farm was Mr Munro's residence, Mrs Munro being the only sister of Mrs Lawrence of Liverpool. Benny saved Mr Munro and Eva Lawrence from being killed, but hurt his arm in his attempt to stop the runaway horse. He promised to visit Brooklands next day, and Eva was requested to sing What are your favourite songs ? Mrs Munro asked Benny. Well, I hardly know," said he, blushingly, there is one called Love at Home which I like very much." Eva rose, went to the pianoforte, and having sang Love at Home," went through the history of Benny when a boy. What a pity," said Mrs Munro, that the boy could not be found here Benny got up and said, I must go now, but before I go I would like to say I am the lost boy." When Mr Lawrence was told of Benny's whereabouts, he offered him a position in his office. Benny made a fresh start in life in a much higher and better position. He found old Joe Wrag at his duty in the streets, and in time Benny became Mr Lawrence's partner and son-in-law, and so had his angel always near him for the rest of his life. The service finished with the hymn "God Moves in a Mysterious Way." --Mr Kitson has presented twelve silver medals as prizes to the members of the Band of Hope. Miss Newark (Capesthorn Towers) has worked and presented a beautiful banner for the Band of Hope, bearing the motto English Baptist Band of Hope." Previous to the service-of-song, the Band of Hope children were entertained to tea and cake, presided over by Miss Newark, Miss Maggie Hughes, Mrs Davies, Miss Bennett, Miss Owen, and Mr W. H. Williams. Mr Walker (Parcia Lodge) accompanied the children on the organ. Buns and sweets were presented to the children at the close, and the usual vote of thanks termin- ated a most pleasant gathering. Much praise is due to the Rev. H. T. Cousins and Mrs Cousins, for the energy they have displayed in connexion with the Band of Hope.—It is pleasing to note that the average attendance at the Tuesday even- ing meetings, is not less than 60, which speaks well for the interest created by those who have the conduct of the meetings. We wish such a good work every success. COLWYN BAY AS THE GLOBE" SEES IT.- Under the heading Welsh Gaiety a leaderette has lately appeared in "The Globe," and from this we make the following extracts Persons in need of rest and change are often puzzled to decide between the conflicting claims of rival seaside resorts. But now and then it happens that one, luckier than the rest, is able to boast some supreme attraction unshared by any of its competitors. This, for example, is the case at the moment with that extremely popular Welsh watering-place, Colwyn Bay, which caters for the needs of its visitors with a profuseness that borders on extravagance One is moved to wonder how the people of Colwyn Bay manage ever to be dull. THE NEW PROMENADE.—It has been finally decided that the laying of the foundation-stone ceremony in connextion with the new Promenade shall take place in the last week in July. The festivities will extend over two days, and two of the following noblemen are to be asked to take part in the proceedings, namely, Lord Stalbridge, Earl Carrington, Lord Mostyn, and Lord Penrhyn. The second day is to be devoted to a floral and horticultural fete held on Pendorlan fields. CRICKET. RYDAL MOUNT V. ST MARY'S COLLEGE, BANGOR. -Played at Colwyn Bay, on May 23rd, resulting in a victory for the visitors by 20 runs. ST. MART'S. RYDAL MOUNT. J. W. Lowe b Penn 1 Penn. not out 39 Wincup b Stainer 2 Stainer, run out. 1 Barlow b Penn 1(5 E M. Simpson b Marriott 0 Rev Fairchild cVVhitehouse Whitehouse b Barlow 1 b Penn Vincent c Jefferson b Chambers c llenn b Stainer 7 Marriott 5 Foster h Stainer 3 Wood (eapt) b Marriott 0 Webster c Penn b Stainer 0 Voss c Chambers b Barlow 3 J. E. Lowe b Kenn 3 Gatnby b JBarlow 0 Marriott b Stainer 0 Humeri, run out 2 Denton, run out 11 Barnes c Wincup b Webster 1 Jefferson, not out .12 F. C. Smith b Barlow 2 Byes 14, leg-bye 1 15 Leg-bye 1 75 55 BOWLING ANALYSIS. BOWLING ANALYSIS. ST. MARY'S. RYDAL MOUNT. 0. M. R. W. O. M. R. W. Stainer 13 2 40 5 Barlow. 8"1 voss 2 3 2 0 0 Penn. 10 2 20 4 WHAT ONE HEARS. That, irrespective of what appeared in the Daily Post, the Bay has its share of visitors. That those visitors were not interfered with by day-trippers. That quietness prevailed in the Bay. That the shop keepers availed themselves ot Whit-Monday as a Bank Holiday. That some went to Conway Camp, and some to Llandudno. That they all said, at the end of the day, Give me Colwyn Bay." That the arrang ments for the fete and gala are progressing favourably. That it is most appropriate to open the new Esplanade with a fete, for, had it not have been for the feet it would not have been required. That something ought to be done for the feet at Colwyn. That the front gardens are now just in good trim for competition. That, if left later on, there will be a change. That there is now a telegraphic connexion between Colwyn Bay and Rhos-on-Sea. DESERTED COLWYN BAY. Headed as above, the subjoined letter appears in The Liverpool Daily Post of May 28th SIR,-In your interesting notice of the Bank Holiday and the various places visited it would seem strange that Colwyn Bay should be singled out as the one place "practically deserted" yesterday. Perhaps the reason is not far to seek. Colwyn Bay does not cater for the multitude in the same way as Blackpool and Douglas. It may be, too, that the commencement of the new Promenade works will interfere with the free and uninterrupted enjoyment of the shore during the construction of the Promenade. While this work is being done, the District Council would do well to pay a visit of inspection to Southport, with its attractive boulvards, gardens, parks, avenues, marine lakes, and garden cemetery." There is much to be seen and learnt from what has been done to make Southport at once the brightest, cleanest, most delightful, and healthy seaside town in England. Colwyn Bay has great natural beauty, and a fine climate, and the same applies to the whole of the district from Old Colwyn, Rhos-on-Sea, Rhos Bay, and the Little Orme. I can quite believe that many people are kept away from Colwyn Bay by reason of the inadequate railway station accommodation. The station is small, and the waiting-rooms and lavatories on the town-side platform are disgrace- ful. That platform is sadly too narrow, and with the pillars blocking the passage along the plat- form, is really dangerous. The crossing to the opposite or up platform is a constant source of danger to passengers, and a bridge for the safe crossing by passengers, with lifts or elevators for luggage, ought to be provided, as at Chester Station. Another source of danger is the small and crowded space in front of the station. The wonder is that some persons are not killed or maimed in approaching or leaving the station. The Council should urge the Railway Directors to carry out the improvements necessary for the convenience and safety of the people who travel to Colwyn Bay. Many people are disappointed when they find that there are no Public Summer or Winter Gardens were rest of mind and body can be found, and where really good music is to be had. Colwyn Bay needs these attractions, and if the ugly Ballast Pit was terraced down with flower beds, grassy lawns, and a Winter Garden and Concert-room in the centre, it would prove to be a very profitable undertaking. Nant- y-Glyn, with its eighteen acres of delighful gar- dens, should also be secured by the District Council. All the advertising in the world would not be as effective in bringing people to Colwyn Bay as would those charming grounds. The magnificent trees, sub-tropical shrubs, plants, and flowers found growing at Nant-y-Glyn and flourishing throughout the winter, would do more to convince the medical profession and satisfy the people generally as to the mildness, dryness, and salubrity of the climate of Colwyn Bay than anything else could possibly do. I venture to predict thatin the near future Colwyn Bay and the North Coast may, with proper attention by the District Councils and others co-operating with them, become as attractive to visitors and invalids as is the South of France. --Yours, &c., E. L. May 26, 1896.

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