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COLWYN BAY.

OLD COLWYN.

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CONWAY.

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Correaronbence.

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COLWYN BAY.

CONWAY.

COLWYN BAY.

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up auove tne sea so mgn, ana wnne loOKing ai the crowd below. Whilst descending on the Pen- maenmawr side of the mountain, the party heard the cuckoo's note so clear as to bring most vividly before the mind's eye Sterne's words,— "The Cuckoo's note is measured and composed by rote his method is distinct and clear, and dwells, like bells, upon the ear." But soon Pen- maenmawr is reachod, a visit is paid to the Glen, and tea is enjoyed, everything being of the very best. After tea, a two-hours stroll around the town and along the promenade and beach, pre- ceded then the homeward journey, which was made along the coast and over the Penmaen- forwyllt," where the wild waves of the angry sea dash against the craggy rocks, and hence through the old gates of Conway, passing the Castle and bridges, and reaching home in nice time, after having enjoyed this outing better than any of its predecessors. WHAT ONE HEARS. That a two-days Floral Fete for Colwyn Bay has been decided on to take place with the stone- laying in July. That a strong committee has been formed. That the Committee has commenced work with vigour and enthusiasm. That the affair is already catching on. That the town has been mapped out for can- vassers. That already offers of support have been numerous and hearty. That the fete is bound to be a success and a big draw. That Colwyn Bay is going to figure smart on Railway Company Bills. That people will be led to come who never came before, And those who love the place will love it still the more So, to finish in rhyme, I make this appeal, Let every Bayite put his shoulder to the wheel. THE COLWYN BAY GAS WORKS. PROPOSED PURCHASE. PUBLIC MEETING. The Rev. Thomas Parry, J.P., A.C.C., Chair- man of the Colwyn Bay and Colwyn Urban District Council, presided, on Friday night, May 8th, at the Public Hall, Colwyn Bay, over a meeting of ratepayers convened for the purpose of considering the advisability of purchasing the Gas Works. Judging from the sparse attend- ance, little interest was taken in the question, there being certainly under 50 persons present. After Mr Parry had explained the object of the meeting, Mr Bevan moved "that this meeting of ratepayers considers it advisable to purchase the Gas Works forthwith." He wished to disabuse their minds of the idea that he was in any way interested in the Gas Works. He had not a farthing of interest in them, in any shape or form, neither had he any relatives, as far as he was aware, who had the slightest interest in the undertaking. He was actuated entirely, in making this proposition, by his own opinion of what was likely to be the future of Colwyn Bay, and of this particular property. He remembered the Gas Woiks starting. He did not know what dividend they paid for the first year or two, but they all knew that for several years they had paid a dividend of 10 per cent. That proved that the property had been increasing in value. No one could look round that District without seeing the immense amount of property which had been put up, and most of these new buildings were custom- ers of the Gas Company. The demand for gas was therefore likely to increase, and, however well the Gas Company had paid in the past, there was not the slightest doubt in his mind that in the future it would pay far better, and, in trying to persuade the ratepayers to buy the property now, he was entirely influenced by the thought that it was a property that would bring in a heavy profit to the ratepayers. In order to make Col- wyn Bay compare with any of her rivals, he was convinced that some other means of rais- ing money than by loans, would have to be found, and nothing better for that purpose could be found than the Gas Works. Besides it would be cheaper to buy the Works now than in a few years hence, as the Company were extending their Works, and the more capital they put in the concern the more it would cost the ratepayers to purchase. There was no need to hesitate as to investing their money in the Gas Works. He saw by the Liverpool Echo the previous day, that the town of St Helens was asking for powers to increase their Gas Works, and the Clerk incidentally mentioned that they bought the Gas Works in 1885, and since then had spent L20,000 in increasing them, and also re- duced the price of gas from 4/- to 2/8, so that the property had proved a gold mine to them. In another town, a sum of between ^7000 and £ 8000 had been transferred from the Gas Works to the reduction of the rates, and he thought that they would not have the Colwyn Bay Gas Works in their hands very long before they would be able to do something similar. The electric light had been mentioned. He did not believe that the electric-light, if it came, would injure the Gas Works as a paying property. Besides, they ought to have the lighting of the place in their own hands. [Hear, hear.]—Mr James Wood, who also disclaimed interested motives, seconded the proposal.—Mr Blud moved, as an amendment "That it is not advisable to purchase the Gas Works at the present time." Gas shares were high now, but it was not certain that they would remain so. Besides, the cost of laying down electric-light plant, was continually decreasing. Besides, the Council had quite as much work on hand at present as it could very well deal with. [Hear, hear.] If they bought the Gas Works, they could not work it on the same lines as the Company was doing. They would have to trust to the officials, and then he questioned whether the undertaking would pay. He thought that it would be better to wait a couple of years at least. They might then get a better bargain.—Mr Bateson seconded the amendment, which was supported by Mr Greenfield.—Mr John Roberts also expressed the opinion that the purchase of the Gas Works at the present time would be unwise.—Mr Bevan having replied, the question was put to the vote, seventeen voting for the amendment, and seven for Mr Bevan's resolu- tion.—The resolution was therefore lost. LLANDRILLO AND EIRIAS U. D. SCHOOL BOARD. At the monthly meeting held on Friday even- ing, May 8th, the Chairman (County-Cooncillor John Roberts) presided, and there were also present the Vice-Chairman (Mr Robert Evans), the Rev. John Edwards, and Messrs Moses Williams, Evan Owen, and D. O. Williams, and the Clerk (Mr Thomas Jones), and the Attend- ance Officer (Mr Thomas Matthews). To comply with a suggestion of the Education Department, that there should be separate Head- masters for the Colwyn Bay Higher-Grade and Board Schools, and in order that the Higher- Grade School should continue qualified to receive the higher Grant, the Board appointed Mr Griffiths to be Principal of the Higher-Grade School (with Mr Turner as assistant-master), and Mr J. O. Davies to be headmaster of the Colwyn Bay Board School. It was announced that the Education Depart- ment had placed the Colwyn Bay Infant Board School upon the list of schools qualified to receive Grants. The Education Department had sent the Inspector's report upon Llwydgoed Board School, from which it appeared that the average attend- ance was 40.2, and that the total Grant was _c62. The Clerk stated that that was an increase of jE2 in the Grant. Mr Moses Williams (addressing the reporter) Will you send that to the Bishop of St. Asaph, and tell him it isn't a Church school. [Laughter]. It further appeared that the Education Depart- ment exempted the School from examination in 1897. [Hear, hear]. Mr Moses Williams said that it was very satis- factory to hear that that School was so success- ful. It had been established under very great difficulties, those connected with the National

CONWAY.

COLWYN BAY.