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LIST OF VISITORS.

The Royal Cambrian Academy…

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-----___-IThe Gwynedd Ladies…

The Conway Volunteer Camp.

Conway and Llandudno County…

The Royal Cambrian Academy…

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glens, the red light on the side of the tremendous crag, and the appropriate shades of the varying greens, are all dealt with absolute truth to nature, and combine to produce on the mind of the spec- tator an impression of natural grandeur not easily surpassed. A gloomy subject which fills the corner of the room is entitled "Unhallowed Ground (No. 144), by Mr J. Pain Davies. It is a large desolate-looking landscape, snow-covered, with a dull laden sky. A pale light is diffused over the scene, by a cloud-hidden moon. As tar as can be gathered, it represents the funeral of a suicide at the junctio I of four roids, the junction being marked by a signpost, at the toot of which stands a solitary monk, and blazes a wood fire. In the middle distance a group of trunks, clad in dense black, stand out with startling clearness, bearing the corpse of the suicide, and them- selves preceded by a couple of other monks also in deep black. The whole scene is depress- ing to a degree, and the difficult low tones are managed with rare skill. It is a grand piece of work. A more cheerful bit of work is found on the opposite wall of the same room, in Mr Joseph Knight (R.I. )'s The Sentinel of the Morn (No. 164). It embodies a grand conception. The sun is just tingeing the hills with gold. Below, profound abysses gloom wlillc--L)n a grassy plateau, midway the ficight,i few sheep quietly browse. Distinct in the clear air above the utmost height of the topmost crag, sails over the abyss a great eagle with outspread pinions. A splendid idea splendidly carried into effect.— Passing by many others well worthy of special note, we just notice a couple of fine portraits by Mr Leonard Hughes two masterly portraits by Mr Paul Knight, and a life-like portrait of Morien" by Mr B. S. Marks, and turn into Room No. 6, known as The Queen's Bedroom." Here a real treat is awaiting the visitor. Visitors, like our- selves, will probably spend a good deal of time at Mr F. T. Sibley's marvellously perfect work, Llwyn Cwm Ffynnon" (No. 187), one of the very finest pictures in the building. In an altogether different key, is Mr J. Finnemore's rollicking Whe 1 the King shall enjoy his own again" (No. 203), a refreshing bit of work but we fancy Mr Finnemore would be puzzled to get the loyal Cavalier's sword into the same loyal Cavalier's scabbard. -M r S. I. Hodson, R. W.S., in the next room has a bright item (No. 235) Street in Junsbruck," which is vis-a-vis to a little gem, by Mr Harold Swanwick, entitled" The Plough- man homeward plods his weary way."—Two of the most striking works in this room, may be seen in Nos. 259 and 264, by Mr J. T. Watts and Mr W. H. Sullivan, respectively. Their titles, in the order named, are "Cheshire Fir Trees" and Disclosing a Plot-The Traitor." We are not very familiar with Cardinals, but we imagine that there is some little incogruity in the wearing, by the ecclesiast in Mr Sullivan's fine picture, of a waxed moustache as well as a carefully groomed imperial. However, that is a detail, and, for aught we know. may be strictly correct, but, for the rest, both Mr Sullivan's and Mr Watts' works are very fine. Our hurried visit closed with a glance at a collection of paintings by the late Mr J. H. Cole, which are well worth looking at, in the Lantern Room, which is this year devoted entirely to the works of this artist. As we have said, ours was only a cursory view. We can assure our readers that the Exhibition is far more worth seeing than may be gathered from this notice, and that among the 295 pictures shown, are many to which we are unable now even to refer, which will each repay a visit. As usual, we have to acknowledge the kindly courtesy of Mr and Mrs Furness, who always "do the honours of Plas Mawr with a grace and urbanity quite in keeping with the nature of their duties in this historic old pile. Visitors, we are sure, will find the same attention and courtesy at their hands. We trust that this year's Exhibition will prove as successful as its predecessors have done, and that the Royal Cambrian Academy of Art will more and more extend the sphere of its operations, till the objects contemplated by its establishment shall have been fully realised.