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The Royal Cambrian Academy of Art. FOURTEENTH ANNUAL EXHIBITION. Once again the time has come for a Press View of the ever-welcome works of art at the popular Plas Mawr Exhibition, and a somewhat hasty look round on Wednesday last enables us to say, generally, that, both as to numbers and quality, the pictures shown this year uphold the high reputation established in former years. This year, however, most of the oils have a far better locale as regards light than has hitherto been the case, as they are located in the handsome new Gallery, a full description of which we publishe I at the time of its formal opening (on the 11th of February) this year. We may as well say at once that we do not now offer our readers a complete account of the pictures now on view. Neither do we claim that our criticisms are those of an expert. They are rather a series of impressions of such pictures as immediately attracted onr attention, anJ which, we imagine, will similarly attract the notice of any who visit the Galleries on Monday or after- wards. Owing to the greatly increased accommodation afforded by the new Gallery, the first three rooms in Plas Mawr are, this year, only sparsely hung with the fruits of the last yeir's work, but in the first room—the Banqueting Hall-a noble work (No. 4, Sunrise on the Matterhorn," by Mr. S. Lawson Booth, F.R.G.S.), at once fixes the roaming glance. Sheer up into the clear sky rises the majestic and imposing- mass of the famous "Matterhorn." On its western slopes- steep and craggy—just the suspicion of morning's red light glints. An impression of utter quietude is felt in gazing at the picture, most suitable to the hour depicted, namely, sunrise. Early as it is, a few irrepressible tourists are seen preparing to cross the slender bridge that spans the mountain stream at the foot of this kingly crag. The general atmospheric effects are splendidly brought out. "Mountain, Stream, and Meal" (No. 7, B. Fowler), will doubtless charm many, though many, doubtless, too, will look somewhat superciliously on the mass of rock doing duty tor the Mountain." As a whole, however, the picture is a charming one, breathing a still peace and calm. In No. ig-" Llanheris Lake, Dol- badarn Castle "—Mr. Lawson Booth again asserts himself, and the beauty of the whole picture is enhanced by a delicious little glint of light falling on the water at the far end of the lake, beyond which the great mountains recede on either hand into the distance, forming a magnificent gorge-like background for a tore- ground replete with beauty. F. W. Hayes is well represented by a couple (Nos. 23 and 24) of portrait studies, Sweet Seventeen," and Lady Belty," both characteristic of the artist. Mr. E. A. Norbury, the genial ex vice-president of the Academy, sends a glimpse of his new far-away home in No. 25, Boat Landing and Chinese Bridges, Klong Kup Mai, Lower Siam," a work full of interest. Mr. J. Clinton Jones contributes a splendidly-conceived excerpt, entitled, On the Way to Dulyn (No. 35), a quiet, restful scene, high up in mountain land, with a dour rain- shower falling heavily at one side of the scene. A human interest in the scene is created by the figure of a solitary shepherd with his dog, in the very centre of the picture, quietly wending his way home. Again Mr. S. Lawson Booth's work forces itself on our notice, in Snovvdon, from Llyn Llydaw (No. 47), and we may here explain, seeing that this is the third time Mr. Lawson Booth's work has already been noticed, that this is not the result of a deliberate selection of this artist's work to the deliberate exclusion of others, but simply the result of a determination to deal only with such pictures as at once, and of themselves, attracted our attention, before we looked at the name of the painter. We are aware that this is not the ordinary method of doing this kind of work in which is usual to give equal prominence to a number of the best-known artists. We have, however, in this instance, chosen to regard the pictures, as nearly as possible, in the same way that a casual visitor to the exhibition would do, and thus pay attention only to those of the paintings which, so to speak, are obtrusively noticeable, at once, either on account of their subject, or the striking excellence of their handling. The omissiun of the name of any particular artist must not, therefore, be regarded either as a slight, or as a token of con- demnation neither, on the other hand, must the frequent mention (whenever it occurs) of any particular name be held to signify our estimate of the importance in the collection of the work of the owner of that name. As a matter of fact, there are, and necessarily must be, scores of pictures well worth detailed examination, criticism, and high commendation, which must be passed over here, and these, those who visit Plas Mawr, will doubtless do full justice to at their leisure. To proceed then 011 our way. No. 47*gives us a somewhat idealized view of the Alonarch of Welsh Mountains, a sort of New Jerusalem view of it. Out of a mass of cloud surrounding its summit, rises a sharp triangular peak which we, certainly, after a pretty long familiarity with" Y Wyddfa," have never had the fortune to see. It is only right, however, to add that we have never looked at Snowdon from Llyn Llydaw. The whole picture, nevertheless, has a dre IInlike charm, and the water at the foot is splendidly treated. Another of the pictures which donia ite the scene, is Mr F. F. Sibley's Windsor Castle (No. 48), and this not merely because of the historic associations surrounding this majestic pile, but because of the inherent excellence of the work as a picture, familiar to all though the subject now is. O.ie is at one e re ninded of Ten- nyson's fine description of Camelot, in looking at this beautiful work :— Far off they saw the silver-misty mora Rolling her sm.Ae about the Royal Mount, That rose batxveeu the forest atil the tield. At times the summit of the hiySi city tlashei At times the spires and turrets halt-way down Prickei through the mist at times the great gate shone Only, that opened on the field below. Another g!ance round the room (The Still Room) reveals to us, singularly enough, another of Mr Sibley's works (No. 30, Wnen the Sun is Low"), a work which in our eyes seemed perfect in every detail and effect. The red sinking sun is shining dully over a desolate coast, through dull red clouds, luridly illumining a desolate wreck.—Passing on to the Wynne Room," our eyes are naturally attracted by a noble present- ment of The towers of Conway" (No. 79), by Mr Oliver Baker, R. P. E., while in the same room Mr George Crozier demands notice with his sple-idid No. 70, A Relic of Past Ages- Girgenti, Sicily." The same artist compels admiration with his beautiful work Sea Gulls by the Shallows (No. 72). We may, however, say that we have never seen sand of the colour painted here by Mr Crozier.Ciose by, Mr A. W. Ayling charms us with a lovely scene, in which the colour of the gorse is most effective, entitled Misty eveiiiiig, -Stissex (No. 69). As is proper, the new Gallery is crowded with the cream of the pictures sent up for exhibition this year, and here, among the first to catch our eye is Mr Joseph Knight, R.A.'s "An Upland Pasture" (No. 88), a spacious moorland scene, with a splendid sky and clouds, and a character- istic gloom over all. Again Mr Lawson Booth comes before us, this time with Llanberis Pass" (No. 101) pure and simple. Mr Booth's treat- ment of this grand subject presents the famous Pass in one of its grandest aspects, the tremen- dous masses of rock on either side being splendidly handled. The whole picture is most striking. — Mr Hamilton Marr's The Dying Day" (No. 102) is to our mind absolutely the loveliest of all the pictures we saw in the Exhi- bition, and we will say no more of it than this. Mr J. Clinton Jones, in No. 104, Evening in the Vale of Conwav," shows an ambitious work in which the colouring to our mind is for the greater part rather too gorgeous. The general effect is, however, spacious, and the trees in the fore- ground are particularly well grouped and drawn. A confre e spoke rather harshly of Mr B. Fowler's In summer time (No. 117), but in our opinion it is a work of great merit, and its treat- ment of the cool lights and shades of a deep wood is extremely fine and effective one sees the idea aimed at, and, more than that, one sees the idea very completely realised.-Pi-ofessor Herkomer shows his famous work Our Village" in this room (No. 133), and it is one that is sure to please visitors, be they experts or not. Just under this Mr S. Sidley shows a charming little study en- titled The Sigual" (No. 134), which will appeal to many sympathies, and, close by, the grand Early Snow (No. 136) of the genial President, Mr H. Clarence Whaite, R.W.S., is another proof that neither his hand or his eye has lost anything of cunning. We, however, prefer the master's handling of A Stronghold of Edward I. (No. 170), on the other side of the room, the descrip- tion of which in the catalogue is It stands four square to all the winds that blow." If we mis- take not, it represents Harlech Castle, and, as Mr Whaite has dealt with it, it embodies to the last tittle the very essence of both title and de- scription. Mr Whaite's treatment of the great rock on which the Castle stands is, of course, superb. Mr J. C. Salmon comes along with a splendid bit of mountain work, Glydir Fawr, from Ogwen (No. 140.) The subject is a mag- nificent one, and it is magnificently handled, the whole work being one of extreme impressiveness, perfect harmony of grouping, and splendid technique. The deep gloom of the valleys and

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