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CONWAY.

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Corre i5pottb once.

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COLWYN BAY.

COLWYN BAY.

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of the meeting. This had been done in the past, and it was wished to prevent it. Alderman Lumley's amendment was defeated, on a division. The report of the Committee was then adopted, and it was decided to prepare copies of the Standing Orders as amended, in English and Welsh. ESTIMATED RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURE FOR THE ENSUING YEAR. From the Finance Committee's report it appear- ed that the County Accountant's estimate for the year ending March 31st, 1897, was, receipts by balances, £ 9249 13s receipts from Treasury, £ 24,645 12s (including £ 21,170 from Local Tax- ation, and £ 2884 Custom and Excise) various other amounts £ 2724 being L36,628 5" added to this is Intermediate Education Rate (id) £ 1220; Technical Education (gd) L305 and 3d) Lio,o65 i is 8d making the General Rate (4s total receipts £ 48,218 16s 8d. The estimated items of expenditure detailed in the various departments, such as roads, bridges, police, prosecutions, salaries ( £ 1450), &c., reached £ 45072 17s, leaving a working balance of £3146. The Committee accompanied this estimate with a recommendation to levy a General Rate of 2§ in the £ on the rateable value of the heriditaments of the County for the first six months of the year a half-penny for intermediate education, and one-eighth of a penny for technical instruction. The bills and claims recommended for payment at this meeting, amounted to L8258 is 3d. COUNTY RATES PAID AND VALUES RECEIVED BACK. The Denbigh Town Council hasjust had present- ed to it, by its highways Committee the following instructive table and remarks thereupon, remarks many of which, in nearly as strong a form might (mutitis mutandis) be used with reference to the lesser but similar injustice suffered by the Colwyn Bay Urban District:—"We venture to submit the following table, and the few remarks following it, to your notice. The table will be easily under- stoods. The first column gives the rateable value of the six Urban Authorities within the county. The second column gives the amount which each contributes towards the County Finances when the rate is at 6!d. in the L. The third column shows what each received from the county for Main Roads; and the fourth column shows how much each receives back for every pound in contributes, for instance, for every pound Llan- gollen pays the county in rates, in gets back i8s., while Denbigh only receives 4s. £ £ £ Llangollen 10,664 289 259 ISS. Ruthin 12,234 331 293 17s. 8d. Abergele 8,102 219 143 13s. otd. Colwyn Bay 39,635 1,073 450* 8s. 4121 d. Wrexham 54,024 1,463 500 6s. io-id. Denbigh 33-525 9°8 224 4s. 1 i\d. 1 his is the amount it is proposed to offer as a contract. The total amount received from rates by the county for the year ending 25th, March, 1895, was L 14, 138. The amount spent upon Main Roads was £ 10,380; that is to say of every pound received from rates 14s. 8d. was spent upon Main Roads. It will be seen, therefore, that Denbigh receives in proportion to its rate- 1( able value far less than any other Urban Au- thority in the county, and gs. 81-d. in the £ less than what is spent generally upon the Main Roads of the county. The intention of the Act of 1888 was undoubtedly to ensure a fair and equitable system throughout the county, and Section I I, Sub-section to. which gives power to the County Council to contribute to wards the Highways in any particular District without actually adopting them, was, no boubt, inserted to meet a case of this kind. At present, the position of Denbigh cannot be said to be a fair one. Owing to its being a much older Borough than any other in the county, no part of the streets of the' town are Main Roads, as is the case in every other Urban District and consequently, the amount expended upon its Main Roads is very much less—in fact, Denbigh has to keep and maintain all its own streets, and it has to contribute an annual sum of L442 (the difference between 4s. i ild. and 14s. 8J. in the 6) towards the maintenance of the streets and roads in other parts of the county." A VOYAGE TO GRAHAMSTOWN, AFRICA. The many friends of Mr Arthur Jones, who, previous to going out to Africa, was in the employment of Messrs Lidbetter and Longinaid (Abergele Road), will be glad to hear something of his whereabouts, and. it is largely for their benefit that we insert this letter which has been received by a friend in the Bay. The letter, which will also be of interest to others of our readers, reads as subjoined Grahamstown, April 6th, 1896.-Dear I've arrived at my destination at last. I was thirty days on the water, and had a very pleasant voyage, and I am glad to say I am much better in health. I came on here direct, as I was advised not to stop at POI t Elizabeth. I am very glad I came on here, as Mrs Williams's relations are very nice people, and have made me very comfortable, which was more than I expected when f came out here, as I expected to rough it. I've also been applying for a situation, which I am likelylo get so things are brightening up. I said I had a very pleasant voyage. I left London on the morning of the 28th ult., and steamed down the Channel through a thick mist, and arrived at Southampton next morning early. We left Southampton the same day, after having embarked passengers, among whom were two Welshmen, who proved very good company all through the voyage. The three following days after leaving Southampton, were days of indescribable misery, nearly everyone being down with sea-sickness, but, when we came out of the Bay of Biscay, it was wonderful how soon every- one recovered. We arrived at Las Palmas in a week after leaving Southampton, where we had a few hours ashore, which I fully enjoyed. It was like a transformation-scene, coming from cold, raw Southampton to sunny genial Las Palmas, with its tropical vegetation and olive- skinned inhabitants. Fruit was very plentiful hete, and I laid in a stock, which came very useful when I got under the Equator, where we had it hot, so hot that the least effort put one into a bath of perspiration. It was bad enough for those who had nothing to do,-it must have been fearful for the stewards and waiters who had their duties to attend to, but we soon passed out of this hot zone, and had a nice breeze play- ing upon us, which made things very pleasant. I saw many things to marvel at in Nature. One of the commonest things were the flying-fish which rose in shoals at the approach of the vessel, and flop back into the water after a short flight. Also, whales were seen one day we struck into quite a shoal of them (5 or 6),—they truly were leviathians, sending up showers of water through their blow-holes. I also one day saw an immense turtle floating quite close to the ship. I thought that would have been a sight to gladden the heart of City Aldermen, who, as you know, are famed for their love of turtle soup. Everything was done to amuse the passengers,— two or three concerts a week, and some very good talent was displayed on these occasions, also the ship's band (which was a very good one, quite equal to the one you have in Colwyn Bay during the summer) played every alternate even- ing, and on Sunday services were held morning and evening, which were attended by all the passengers, and we had some very good meet- ings, and the time passed away very pleasantly until our arrival at Capetown, where the majority of the passengers disembarked. Capetown is a fine city, with fine streets and buildings to match anything in the old country, and Botanical Gardens with all kinds of tropical plants growing, but the most striking feature of Capetown is Table Mount, which rises to a height of 5oooft., almost perpendicular from the back of the town, and while we were there was covered by the Table Cloth, which consists of a thick cloud of vapour lying upon the mountain in delicate folds exactly like a table cloth. I left Capetown after a stay of three days, and came on here, which is a town of about 8000 inhabitants, and beauti- fully situated in a valley, the hills round about j being covered with trees. They have a fine Public Library here and Museum, and the place is thronged with Churches and Chapels, so much so, that it has earned the nickname of the City of the Saints." I hope it is a true one, so no one may have occasion to be ashamed of it. The Kaffirs are not thought so much of here as they are at home they are made to understand that they are a very inferior race to the whiteman. Should a Kaffir and a White chance to meet on the street, the Kaffir always has to stand on one side and make room for his superior they are not allowed to live in the towns, but are located outside in shanties of their own building, resembling pig-styes more than human habita- tions, but they are a very crafty race, will impose upon you at every opportunity, and, if you treat them kindly, they mistake that as a weakness on your part, and treat you accordingly, so there's plenty of field for missionary effort among these poor degraded beings, who have acquired all the vices of the Whites, but none of their virtues. Give my kind regards to Holmyard and my other numerous friends and my warmest greeting to the C. E. Society, the memory of which will live for many a long day. So farewell for the present, Yours faithfully,—ARTHUR. P.S.—I've secured a situation, commencing this week, and the hours are very reasonable, from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., with an hour for dinner.- ARTHUR.