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Congo Institute, Colwyn Bay.

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Flowers of Wild Wales.

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Flowers of Wild Wales. No. 2. Newcastle Weekly Chronicle Supplement (March 21st, 1896) :-A stroll along the shore from Colwyn Bay to Little Orme's Head yielded us much pleasure. In the field the scarlet poppies bloomed in abundance, and on the sandy path at our feet the rarer round-headed poppy ( Papaver hybridum), was to be seen, and further on, between the stones of the sea-wall, spreading its golden blossoms and long seed vessels, the horned poppy (Glaucium hiteum). The Litter plant has a glaucous foliage and a handsome flower. It takes the term horned from the peculiar shape of the seed vessel, which reminds one of the silicle of the cruciferous order. A pretty little plant with large white flowers, in comparison to its size, is the knotted spurry (Spergula nudosa) flourishing on the sandy com- mon we are now about to pass. Here the rest- harrow, so familiar a plant on Whitley links, presents quite a formidable appearance, becom- ing a shrub from one to two feet in height, and bearing spines an inch or so long amongst its very fine flowers. The dove's foot geranium, and another species, the long-stalked geranium, bloom here with the stork's bill (Erodium circutarium), the prickly ox-tongue, the teasle, the larger knap- weed and the scabious (Brassica campestris), small poterium, and spurge. On Conway sands, a few miles from Llandudno,the Rosa spinosissima abounds. Here we found the last rose of summer, a pale yellow specimen, and plenty of jet black hips, also the pretty blue flowers and leaves of the sea thistle (Eringium maritimum). which are still decorating our vases mixed with feathery grasses of various sorts. The sea purslane and glass worts are plentiful on this beach the latter, such strange looking plants, forming themselves quite a subject for study. We found leaves of the sea convolvulus, but we were too late to see it bloom. I forgot to record in my first paper on the Great Orme, which appeared in the Weekly Chronicle of December 14th, 1895, the verocium, the small- est thistle (Carduus acaulis), about three inches high, bearing its flower, and a discoid knapweed of like dimensions. The lovely blue flowers of a statice are to be seen on the muddy shores of Conway river. How the seeds of this plant reach maturity, being washed by every tide, seems to me a perfect wonder. In this neighbourhood may be found the commoner sea aster, also Arenaria rubece. The sandy common between Llandudno and Deganwy mountain is studded with the golden stars of the Inula pulicaria. The dusky red of the hound's tongue blossom is here and also the tiny twinkling blue eyes of the bristly Lycopsis arvensis. Two water plants next attracted our attention the first in a pond, the other in a ditch, being the rose-coloured Poly- gonum amphibium and pink veronica, with forget. me-nots in great beauty and number. On Deganwy mountain the maiden pink rewarded our search, or more correctly speaking, we were astonished to find a flower which appears to be Dianthus deltoides. This rock looks like sand- stone and the flora seems to be different from that of the Ormes. The little churchyard at its foot is gay with the rare violet flowered viper's bugloss. In this neighbourhood we saw henbane. that poisonous plant flixweed, also in flower musk mallow (Malva rotundifolia) and Malva sylvestris, all three. A curious trefoil, the hare's foot, grows about here. and Solanum nigrum with purple flowers and spines. Is this a variety, I wonder ? M. F. C. ALCOCK, Newcastle.

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Colwyn Bay and Colwyn Urban…