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COLWYN BAY.

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COLWYN BAY. COLWYN BAY AND ABERGELE PETTY SESSIONS. COLWYN BAY, SATURDAY. MARCH 14TH.- Before the Rev W. Venables-Williams (chairman); T. G. Osborn, Esq John Lewis, Esq and County-Alderman Thomas Parry. In the case in which Matilda Dossett applied, under the Matrimonial Clauses Act, 1895, for a separation from her husband, William Thomas Dossett, the Bench granted an order, with 6s per week maintenance, the defendant to pay all costs. The license of the Cambrian Hotel, Pensarn, Abergele, was tranferred from Mr F. Ashby to Mr Knight. Isaac Hughes, Caeau Farm, Colwyn Bay, was fined 10s and costs for furious driving. Daniel Davies, Bryn Llwyni, Colwyn Bay, was fined 20s and costs for not reporting swine fever. David Jones (Llangerniew) was fined 5s and costs for obstructing the highway at Colwyn Bay with a cart.—For a similar offence, Robert Griffiths, milk-dealer, was fined 10s and costs. FOOTPATH OR NO FOOTPATH, THAT WAS THE QUESTION ? W. H. Roberts, chemist, Colwyn Bay, was charged, by Inspector Robinson (of Abergele), with riding a bicycle on the footpath of the Aber- gele and Llanddulas Road.—Inspector Robinson proved the case.—The defendant said that he was under the impression that a footpath should be kerbed and channelled. Where he rode was not kerbed or channelled. He thought that it was only mud brushed on one side. [Laughter]. —Inspector Robinson said that it was a well- defined footpath.—The defendant said that the roads were very bad, and he thought he was within his rights. Of course, if it was a footpath, he was guilty.-The Chairman Guilty in quali- fication. [Laughter], You are guilty of being found out. [More laughter]. Excuse me, because the great crime of the present day is being tound out. [Renewed laughter). The defendant said that he did not agree with that, but he really did believe that he was quite within his rights in riding where he did, as it was not kerbed or channelled. —After some consultation with his colleagues, the Chairman said,-The Bench are sorry to say they find you, Mr Roberts, guilty of the technical offence of riding on the footpath. We must put a stop to that, and we fine you he large sum of sixpence without costs. [Laughter]. Of course, that is simply as a warning to other cyclists. A SCENE. William Roberts (Llysfaen), Edward Williams, Robert Jones, William Price, and Hugh Jones (all of Penrhynside), were summoned for being drunk at the Ship Hotel, Llandrillo, on March 5th, and the landlord, Robert Jones, was charged under five informations with permitting drunkenness.— Mr Alun Lloyd defended in all the cases.— Sergeant Jones deposed to seeing the men drunk at the Ship, and that the landlady admitted they were drunk, but said she did not notice it until they had been served.—The case against Roberts having been heard, the Justices retired to consult, and, after they had been absent about fifteen minutes, what sounded like an angry discussion was heard proceeding from the Justices' Room. Once or twice the Chairman partially opened the door, entered the Court, and looking back at his brother Justices, exclaimed "I have the courage of my convictions, and I won't Stand it. Justice must be done." The sound of voices from inside the retiring-room was heard inviting the Chairman to return, which he eventually did, with Mr O. George (the Clerk). Further deliberations took place, and after about ten minutes the Justices all returned to the Court.The Chairman announced that the case was dismissed, and he ventured to say that he had never been so insulted in his life as he had that day in the retiring-room. One of the Justices had told him to his face that he was inclined to favour public-houses, which was a most monstrous allegation to make.—Mr Alun Lloyd said that he had practised before the Chair- man for many years, and had the fullest con- fidence in his decisions. He could testify that the Chairman had no fads.—Mr Amphlett rose and concurred in what Mr Alun Lloyd had said.-The Chairman then withdrew.—Mr T. G. Osborn took the chair, whereupon Mr Lloyd said that he had been so much moved by the excitement that he felt that he could not properly defend the other clients that day. He respectfully suggested that the cases be adjourned.—Mr Osborn said that it was very much to be regretted that the Chairman had made public property of what was a private discussion. He quite agreed that the cases should be adjourned.—It was understood that they would be heard on April 4th. COLWYN BAY PETTY SESSIONS. Headed as above, the subjoined letter was sent to The Liverpool Mercury Sir,—I observe that in your report of a case heard before me and other magistrates on Saturday last, Mr T. G. Osborne, who took the chair after I had left the court, said it was very much to be regretted that the Chairman had made public property what was a private discussion." To this I emphatically demur. In the private room I told my brother Justices that, after what had been said, I would go into Court and openly make known the insult I had been subjected to. I was implored not to do so, as perhaps Mr Parry would withdraw what he had said. Mr Parry was silent. All this is confirmed by what I was overheard from the Court to say, I have the courage of my convictions and I won't stand it justice must be done." The facts are briefly these :—When we retired to consider our judg- ment in the case of William Roberts as to whether he was drunk on licensed premises or not, having ert the Junior Magistrate (Mr Parry) accord- ing to the usual custom For or against a con- viction," to which he at once replied For," I passed on to the others, when there was a divided Court, and in such cases I adopt the judgment of L. J. Coleridge and J. Manisty in Regina v. Ash- plant, that, when justices are divided in opinion, the proper course is to dismiss the summons. However I gave it firmly as my opinion that no conviction could be upheld in any Court of Appeal, on the evidence adduced before us that day, when the junior magistrate (Mr Parry) had the temerity (not to say want of propriety) to say You always hold that opinion where a public-house is concerned." I considered that an unwarrantable assertion. I went into Court and

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