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COLWYN BAY.

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CONWAY.

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CONWAY. Parish Church (Sunday Services): 8.0 a.m. Celebration of the Holy Communion. 9.45 a.m. Welsh service. 11.15 a.m. English service. 6.0 p.m. Welsh service. 8.0 a.m. on Mondays, Tuesdays Thursdays, and Saturdays, Matins. 10.30 a.m. on'Wednesdays and Fridays, Matins A and Litany. St. Agnes 6.0 p.m. English service. Wesleyan Methodist Chapel.-(English Services).— Next, Sunday: Morning 11.0, evening 6.30, Mr T. W. Williams, Penmaenmawr. A GOOD PLACE FOR BOOTS.—For the best and cheapest of all classes of Boots and Shoes go to Joseph Jones, Berry Street, Conway. Best Shop for repairing. adv. IOq- TO-MORROW THE NOMINATION-DAY FOR ELECTIVE AUDITORS. To-inorrow (Saturday), September 22nd, is notified to be the day for nomination of persons qualifield to act as the two Elective Auditors for the Borough of Conway. PROPOSALS TO BORROW FOUR THOUSAND POUNDS.—At ten o'clock next Tuesday morning, September 25th, there is to be a Local Govern- ment Inquiry into applications, by the Conway Corporation, for permission to borrow sums total- ling- £4000, for the purposes of works of gas- and water-supply. THE HARVEST THANKSGIVING. -The Conway Church harvest-thanksgiving festival will be held on Wednesday, October roth. The preacher at the English morning service, will be the Rev Canon Roberts, Vicar of St Paul's, Colwyn Bay. In the evening, at the Welsh service, the preacher will be the Rev E. T. Davies ("Dyfrig"), Vicar of Pwllheli. The English evening service will be held on Friday, October 12th, when the Venerable Archdeacon Howell has kindly promised to preach. THE CHURCH TEMPERANCE SOCIETY. The inaugural meeting of the adult section of the Church Temperance Society will be held on Thursday evening, October nth, when the Rev E. T. Davies will give a Welsh address. THE BOROUGH MEMBER ON THE TEMPERANCE QUESTION.—Speaking at the annual meeting of the South Wales Temperance Federation, held at Tredegar, on Thursday, September 13th, Mr Lloyd George, M.P., declared that the publican now, as an electioneering force, outweighed all the parsons, capitalists, and landlords in the kingdom-he for the time being dominated Eng- lish politics and this accounted for the reluctance with which even Liberal Governments approach projects for solving the liquor question. Mr Lloyd George maintained that, with Home Rule for Ireland and the abolition of the veto power of the House of Lords to face, a comprehensive and well-considered Bill on the temperance question could not be expected from the Imperial Parlia- ment within the limits of this generation. He thought that it was incumbent upon the temper- ance party in Wales, if they meant to secure legislation on this or any other kindred social question, to induce the Imperial Parliament to delegate its power to legislate on this and other questions which concerned themselves alone to some representative body in Wales-in other words, the solution was to be found in Home Rule all round. The advocacy of devolution seemed to him to be the most effective means for promoting the great Temperance cause. CONWAY LITERARY AND DEBATING SOCIETY. At the Conway Literary and Debating Society's meeting on Tuesday evening, September 18th, at the Guild Hall, Conway, the President (Mr A. G. Kaye) in the chair, the following were declared duly nominated :—President (three candidates for one vacancy), Messrs T. B. Farrington and J. E. Conway-Jones, and the Vicar of Conway (Rev J. P. Lewis). Vice-Presidents (five candi- dates for two vacancies) Rev J. Harries, Councillor J. P. Griffiths, Rev Dr Llugwy Owen, and Messrs J. R. Furness and J. Roger Dawson. Hon. Treasurer Mr A. G. Rogers. Hon. Secretaries (four candidates for two vacancies) Messrs John Williams (Lancaster Square), John Williams (Bradford House), A. Petch, and Moses Parry. Committee (six vacancies): All the nominated candidates for President, Vice- Presidents, and Hon. Secretaries, together with Miss Mathews, Miss J. E. Jones (High Street), and Messrs W. G. Williams (Relieving Officer), Loyd Jones (Melbourne House), T. Hughes (Gweryl Lodge), J. C. Salmon, J. W. Post, and — Stephenson. The election was announced to take place next Tuesday evening, September 25th. Councillor Charles Drover was duly proposed and seconded for membership, and the ballotting was announced to be taken that day week. Sundry notices of motion were also given, and the proceedings ended shortly after half-past nine. CONWAY AND LLANDUDNO COUNTY COURT. LLANDUDNO, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 6TH.— Before His Honor Judge Sir Horatio Lloyd. FOUR SHILLING A MONTH. Owen Williams, grocer, Colwyn, sued Owen Davies, quarryman, Llysfaen, for £ 29, and the defendant was ordered to pay at the rate of 4s. a month. THE OWNERSHIP OF A PUPPY. Mr P. J. Webster, solictor, Conway, success- fully defended William Trevor, Conway, against a claim for one guinea, the value of a puppy detained by him, and alleged to be the property of Sergt.-Instructor Robert Wraight, for whom Mr W. D. Henderson, solicitor, Llandudno, ap- peared. Mr Webster then applied for the allow- ance of the costs of a witness, a shoemaker, who had lost his day by attending to the Court, but His Honor refused this application, and caused great laughter by saying "Let him stick to his last." REVISION COURT. On Wednesday afternoon, September 19th, Mr W. Baldwin Yates revising-barrister, sat at the Guild Hall, Conway, for the revision of the lists of Parliamentary county-voters for the parishes of Llangwstenin and Llangelynin, and Conway. Mr George Owen (Carnarvon) represented the Con- servatives, and Mr R. D. Williams appeared for the Liberals. Afterwards, the lists of Parliament- ary borough, burgess, and parochial voters for the several parishes and portions of parishes within the Borough of Conway, were gone through. Mr R. D. Williams was greatly hampered by the absence of his local agent, and by the failure to attend on the part of most of the Liberals whose votes were seriously contested. The Conservative objection to Mr John Hughes, High Street, was withdrawn, Mr Hughes being given half-a-crown for his attendance that afternoon, at some incon- venience, to defend his vote. John Ambrose Lloyd, Upper Gate Street, was objected to by the Conservatives, on account of the unsufficiencyof his qualification, and his Parliamentary vote was struck off, his burgess vote remaining. John Hughes, Vulcan, was objected to, by the Conser- vatives, because he had not been in possession the requisite time for Parliamentary purposes, and was allowed the burgess vote only, as were also (on various grounds) John Evans, 3 Lower Gate Street; Robert Thomas, High Street; and Thomas Thomas, Rose Hill Street. Several residing in Conway-in-Rhos, were similary struck off for Parliamentary purposes. Mr William Walker, postmaster, Conway, was allowed a Parliamentary vote, but not a burgess vote. CONWAY AUXILIARY BIBLE SOCIETY'S ANNUAL MEETING. The Conway Auxiliary British and Foreign Bible Society's annual meeting was held, at the Market Hall, on Wednesday evening, September 19th. In the unavoidable absence of the chair- man (Supt. H. D. Williams, Police Station) through illness, County Councillor H. Owen (Snottyn), was unanimously elected to the chair. On the platform we saw the Rev J. R. Ellis (late Wesleyan Missionary in India), deputation from the Parent Society Rev. W. C. B. Turner (English Wes- leyan) Rev. D. Williams (Calvinistic Methodist) Rev. O. Evans (Welsh Wesleyan); and Councillor J. P. Griffiths (Local Hon. Sec.) After a hymn had been sung, and the Rev. W. C. B. Turner had read a chapter and had led in prayer, the Chairman, after stating the object of the meeting, said that though Wales had been greatly benefited through the Bible, there were many parts which had, as yet, not had the privi- lege of its possession and that though they in Wales had their Sunday Schools, he wished to see everybody turning all its lessons to them- selves. The Secretary having read the Treasurer's report, which showed that during the last year £ 19 19s. 9d. had been collected out of which £ I 19s. 6d. had been paid for work done, and £ i8 os. 3d. had been forwarded to the Parent Society, the Rev. Mr. Ellis said that he was proud of the honour conferred upon him as depu- tation from the Society. He was also glad that he need not enter into details as to the geography of India, as the ignorance with regard to that country had now passed away. But he had to state two very important facts as regarded that country, which everybody must know before they can enter into any question regarding India, and those were: -(i.) That India is a very large country and (2.) That India is not inhabited by one nation, but by a great many different nations, different as to religion, habits, and manners. He then went on to remark upon the various Mis- sionary Societies which were carrying on their Master's work in India. In Travancore (South India) the London Missionary Society was makmg grand progress that district had a great many cities with populations wholly made up of Christ- ians. Another nation of which the reverend gentleman spoke was the Telegus. The Bible ha,d been translated into 32 different languages. It was in the midst of the Telegus of South India, that the American Baptist Missionary Society was doing splendid work. That Society baptised 18,680 converts in one year. A little before last Christmas, 6500 were baptised in one day. There was between the above two districts another nation, which is composed of nineteen million people. More of this nation are Christians than of all the other nations together. Their language was very musical, and the speaker proceeded to recite the Lord's Prayer in it. He also said that the translating of the Bible was a very difficult work, and gave a literal translation of the verse, God so loved the world," etc., to illustrate that fact. He said that that was a great drawback to the Bible Society. He also stated that one of the greatest obstacles in the way of the Bible was the duplicity of the educated Hindoos. There are thousands of Hindoos who can speak and read English, and several have been raised to posts of of great honour, but these, although they de- nounce all native superstition and idolatry when in English circles and influence, as soon as they cross their own threshold, at once fall back to their old religion. Another feature was their great outward religiousness. They make every- thing religious, even going into and getting up from bed, bathing, lying and cheating. When cheating religiously, they used to buy a particular idol (which the speaker showed, and which, he was told, was of Birmingham make). Twelve hundred Bibles were sent last year to the educated classes of Southern India, who,believing the Word, had not the courage to proclaim their convictions at the cost of losing their social position amongst the natives. A bookseller told him that he had sold thirty-two copies of Thomas a Kempis's "Imitation of Christ" last year, and one copy of Fletcher's Manual of Devotion," to some of the leading men of the Hindoo religion. A Brahmin editor, in an editorial paragraph, speaking of the prospects of the Christian and Hindoo religions, had said that the Hindoo religion was on its deathbed; that several native Christians have started a crusade against it and that, if the educated classes, who believe in the new religion, would only awake to their work, they would give the old Hindoo religion its death-blow. Last year the Bible Society had four million Bibles put into circulation, out of which number Indian

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Items of Interest.

The First Election of Parish…

Y GOLOFN GYMREIG.

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COLWYN BAY.

CONWAY.