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Family Notices

COLWYN BAY.

CONGO METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATORY,…

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THE PARISH COUNCILS ACT.

CONWAY.

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Correspondence.

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Correspondence. [In no case are we responsible for the opinions expressed in this column.1 To the Editor. THE PARISH COUNCILS ACT. SIR,-In a few weeks we shall be called upon to put into operation the above Act. It is therefore time we considered what we should do so as to put to the best possible use this great measure and grandest instalment of local self-government we have yet received. I call it an instalment, because, although the powers it confers upon us are many and great, although it brings the principle of local self-government to every cottage door, it still remains but the forerunner of larger powers and a more full and perfect system that must soon follow on. Nevertheless, the Act as it stands, claims to be so far the greatest reform of the century. It creates a new system of Local Government, and aims a blow that must shatter, to a great extent, all that patronage, privilige, and monopoly of political power, so long held by the rich and privileged few. It bids us Ring out the old, ring in the new, Ring out the false, ring in the true." The rich will no longer have the power to pack our Boards of Guardians, no longer have the power to assess their own property and everybody else's they will only have an equal share in this power with the humbliest collier in the land. But, apart from this and many other matters the Act deals with, its grea-test value, to my mind, lies in the allotments clauses, which give to the people access to the land from which, through bad laws and an unjust land system, they have been so long divorced. These clauses are the hearty response of our Liberal leaders to the cry that has so long been heard '• From many a teeming alley, From many a starving home, From many a desert valley .Where now the wild deer roam, From many a poisoned river, And many a fruitless plain, Has called us to deliver Our land from error's chain." And so the allotments clauses give us compulsory power to obtain land for cultivation in allotments. But the value of all this power depends upon the way in such power is exercised. If resolutely and intelligently carried out, the Act cannot fail to brighten the social life, to add comfort, and security to many an hearthstone, to build up the home life, and prove an unbounded blessing to all our people. To the Liberal party, this Act and our thanks are due. To Liberals we must look for the just and proper enforcement of its provi- ions. To those men whose minds are in harmony with the aims and purposes of the Act, to all Liberals, I say then, Let us be up and doing for a good work lies before us, and a glorious opportunity has come."—Yours faithfully, Idsall House, J. BLUD. Colwyn Bay.

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\- ,- OLD COLWYN. ,

CONWAY.