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Family Notices

COLWYN BAY.

CONGO METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATORY,…

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THE PARISH COUNCILS ACT.

CONWAY.

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Correspondence.

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\- ,- OLD COLWYN. ,

CONWAY.

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A SERIOUS ACCIDENTAL FALL.—On Wednesday afternoon, September 12th, by an accidental fall in Conway Castle, the youngest daughter of Mr Mayman (of Plas Iolyn, Conway, and of Oxford) sustained serious injuries in the shape of a fracture of the fore-arm and a very severe shock to the system. A pony-carriage was procured, and, after skilful treatment by Dr R. A. Prichard, the young lady was taken to PI,as Iolyn, where it is understood that her recovery is progressing satis- factorily. THE VALEOF CONWAYCONGREGATIONAL UNION. —On Monday, September loth, the monthly meet- ing of the Vale of Conway Congregational Union was held at Conway, under the presidency of Mr Thomas Jones (Llanrwst). The report of the Committee appointed to take into consideration the dividing of the county into three Unions instead of two were presented and adopted, and the Revs D. P. Davies (Penmaenmawr), W. Evans Jones, J. Evans Owen (Llanberis), and L. Williams (Bontnewydd), were appointed to attend the South Carnarvonshire Union next week to com- plete the arrangements for the division. Sermons were delivered by the Rev K. Thomas (Llanfair- fechan), T. Jones, and D. S. Thomas (Llanrwst). CONWAY LITERARY AND DEBATING SOCIETY.— The first meeting of the above; will be held, within the Guildhall, next Tuesday evening, September 18th, at 8 p.m when all members are requested to attend. ENGLISH PRESBYTERIANISM.—Last Sunday. Sep- tember 9th, the Rev W. G. Owen, of Beaumaris, conducted the services at the Railway Mission- room. The Rev John Edwards, Colwyn Bay, will preach at 11 o'clock in the morning and at 6.30 in the evening of next Sunday. DR BARNARDO'S HOMES. On Wednesday evening. September 12th, a lecture was given, at the Boys' Schoolroom, by Mr James B. Wookey (Deputation Secretary of Dr. Barnardo's Homes), upon Work for Christ among Waifs and Strays." The Mavor of Conway (Councillor Dr R. At thur-Prichard, J. P., C.C.) was to have occupied the chair, but another engagement called him away (not, however, before he had apologised to the lecturer for his unpreventable but unwilling absence, and assuring the lecturer that he would undertake all the expenses of the Schoolroom. Selections of music were very efficiently given by the "Musical Boys" (including handbell ringers, pipers, etc.). The lecturer explained the hours kept at the Home for Boys, a boy-bugler exemplifying the various calls described, the boys being stated to be ordered to various duties according to these calls of the bugle. As to the sources whence come the five thousand juveniles under Dr Barnardo's care, the lecturer explained that only a fraction of this large number came from the slums of London—many had never seen London before they came to the Homes. Up to date, upwards of twenty-four thousand had been permanently rescued, and now an average of fully thirty new cases were admitted each week.! These might be classified as children of criminals,! children of the vicious poor, and children of the j decent (but unfortunate) poor. The boys were taught trades or Canadian farming, and were placed out in life the girls were taught to be domestic servants. The magnitude of Dr Barnardo's work might be shown by a simple fact, that every week there was spent £ 150 for bread and margerine alone yet there was no endowment, and each week they did not know whence the money would come to pay the next week's expenses. The lecturer extended a cordial invitation (and not a merely formal one) to all persons present to visit the Homes, at any time except on Saturday afternoon. He thanked all friends in Conway who had helped in various ways, and especially Councillor J. P. Griffiths, who had acted as local correspondent. The meeting ended with the singing of the Doxology. A CYCLIST SERIOUSLY INJURED AT GYFFIN. About nine o'clock on Wednesday evening, Mr. Rayner, aged about seventeen, and residing with his parents at River View, The Terrace, Barnes, London, lost control of his brakeless, cushion- tyred safety bicycle as he was descending the hill between Bryn-glorian and Gyffin, and ran into the strong iron railings fronting the houses at the foot of the hill. So great was the force of the impact that the railings were broken, and the machine smashed into a shapeless mass. The unfortunate cyclist was taken to the house of Mr. Morris, where he has since recovered conscious- ness, thanks to the skilful attention of Councillor Dr. M. J. Morgan, who, in response to inquiries by the Weekly News representative, yesterday afternoon, stated that the patient's symptons were favourable, and gave hopes of his recovery. The personal injuries sustained consisted of deep cuts on the scalp, on the chin, and under the left eye (one of the facial bones being broken) a fracture of the right kneecap; and concussion of the brain. Too much praise can scarcely be awarded Mr. Morris and Dr Morgan for their indefatigable attention. Mr. Rayner's parents have been notified. MR. H. CLARENCE WHAITE, P.R.C.A., R.W.S., —The September number of the Art Journal con- tains a capital article on Bettwsycoed, charmingly illustrated from sketches by Mr. H. Clarence Whaite, P.R.C.A., R.W.S., and among these powerful sketches the most impressive is one of Lake Elsi. That seems also the opinion of the able critic who penned the following review in the Cambridge Chronicle (September 7th, 1894) Excellent illustrations are given in the Art Journal for this month of Bettwsycoed, which is one of the resting-places for those of artistic tem- perament. At one time or another every artist and every art lover has been there if only for a single day. Since David Cox made it his chief resort, more than fifty years ago, Bettwsycoed has steadily increased in artistic fame. All the waterfalls have been painted, every valley has had its masterpiece, and almost every rock can be found in one picture or another. Within recent years—Bettws—to give the simple name affection- ately inscribed in the hearts of the whole Welsh worÍd-has been considered too picturesque to be acceptable to the youner generation of advanced artists but to those who do not care for scenery which is only pretty, we give the following advice. If fortune or fate leads you to Bettws, and you wish to draw the lesser known and unconventional, go up the hills behind the village and paint the moorlands a thousand feet above the houses. Lake Elsi, one of the calmest of placid lakes on a summer day, may be seen to be one of the grandest sheets of small water in our islands. No pretty winding wavelets, no moss-grown rocks, not a habitation of any kind except a shelter for sheep nothing but grand bold lines, straight, masterly, powerful, severe form and rocky masses, no trees, little herbage, and a mobility of composition directly impressionable to the true artist."