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COLWYN BAY. p SUNDAY SERVICES. Parish Church, Llanclrillo.— Knglish Services, 11.0 a.m. and 6.30 p.m. Welsh Service, 930 a a Mid-d ay Celebration of the Holy Communion on the 1st Sunday in the month. Rev W. Venables Williams, M.A. Oxon., Vicar Surrogate. Mr. Bernard, Organist. This interesting Old Church, built in the 13th century, is It mile from Colwyn Bay, on the Llandudno Road. Paul's Church, Cohvyn Bail.-All Seats are free. English Services: (Sundays) 8 a.m., Holy Com- munion 11a.m., Service and Sermon; 3.30 p.m., Litany (except on the last Sunday in the month, when there is a Children's Service at 3.0 p.m.) 7.0 p.m., Service and Sermon; Sunday School, 2.30 p.m. Welsh Services 10.0 a.m., Service and Sermon in Mission Room; Sunday School, 2.30 p.m.: 6.0 p m., Service and Sermon in Mission Room. (Week-days) Daily Services at 11.0 a.m. and 7.0 p.m.; Holy Communion on Saints' Days, after the 11.0 a.m. Service, and on Thursdays. Sermon on Wednesday nights. Singing Practice on Friday nights at 7.30 p.m. Children's Meeting on Mondays at 6 p.m. The Clergy: The Rev Canon Roberts, B.A., Vicar. The Rev Meredith J. Hughes, F.R.H.S., and the Rev J. H. Astley, p M.A., Curates. English Wesley an—St. John's,—The Avenue.—Next Sunday morning 11.0, evening 6.30, Rev. W. T. Davison, D D Handsworth. Prayer meeting morning 10.15. Sunday School, afternoon 2.30. Wednesday evening, 7.0, Rev. S. Swithenbank, Tranby. English Presbyterian. — Next Sunday morning, 11.0. evening, 6.30, Rev. John Edwards, Sunday School, afternoon 2.30. Monday evening, 6.35, Band of Hope. Wednesday week-evening- service, 7.0. Thursday evening, 7.0, Young People Bible Class; 7.45, Y. P. S. Christian j-, Endeavour. Rev John Edwards, Pastor. English Co,)igi-egatioii al--Moriiing, 11.0, evening 7.0. Sunday School, afternoon 2.30. Monday evening, 7.30, Christrian Endeavour Society. Every Tuesday, 3.15, United Meeting for the promotion of Scriptural Holiness. Wednesday evening, 7.30. jp Rev Thomas Lloyd, Pastor. English Baptist Church.—Next Sunday morning, 11.0; evening, 6.30. All seats free. Prof. J. T. Marshall, M.A.,Manchester. Sunday School,after- noon, 2 30. Wednesday evening, at 7.30, Prayer and Bible Reading; all are cordially invited, presided over by the Rev H. T. Cousins, F.li.G S., Pastor. Society of Friends —Meeting for Worship, every First Day (Sunday) morning, at 1115, at a room in Central Buildings, facing Station Road, Colwyn Bay. Open to the Public and Visitors. *W!9° Institute.— Divine Services, Sunday, 31.0 a.m.; Sunday School, 2.30 p m. Tuesday" evening, a Prayer Meetb g at 7. Services will be conducted by the Director, one of the Tutors, or some other Minister. All are cordially invited. Visiting hours for friends and visitors every week day, from 2.30 to 3 30. The HEAD OFFICE is in Station Road. Hours of "ttezidai, .-For sale of Postage Stamps, Postal in' Payment of Postal and Money Orders, Sav- Annuity and Insurance Business, Issue g Licenses, from 7 a.m. to 8.45 p.m. Sundays, from T ° 10 a.m. (for sale of Stamps and Registration of Otters only). DELIVEEIES OF LETTERS AND PARCELS. 7 a.m. Letters. 7.30 a m. Parcels. 2 p.m. Letters and Parcels. 7 p.m. Letters and Parcels. A-M. DESPATCHES.—WEEK DAYS. 8.30 Oereral (Letters and Parcels.) 1120 North Wales (Letters). 11.20 Manchester (Parcels). 11.50 General (Letters). Ireland. 11.50 Liverpool and Manchester, etc. P-in, 1.10 Llandudno. 1-40 Chester and forward places (Letters and Parcels). 7-30 General despatch of Parcels. °-35 Box cleared for the night mail (Letters). St,, With Jd. stamp up to 8.45 p.m. nI>AYS (Letters): 130K cleared at S.35 p.m. With extra ld. staUJp, 8.45 p.m. TELEGRAPH OFFICE. WEEK DAYS From 8.0 a.m. to 9.0 p.m. SUNDAYS From 8 0 a.m. to 10 0 a.m. £ ^VANted AJJ G-OOC] housewives to know that fea.Ves s Teas are Excellent and his Coffee Per- son. Boston House. ad 265 -52 TJV^ESLBYAN HOME MISSION AFFAIRS.—AMONG1 ^.temporary and diminishing-grants (to Circuits) e Monday's Representative Session of the esleyan Conference now being holden at Bir- tnin$Zhaiii, was a ^40 grant to Colwyn Bay. 40 PIONEER BATH-CHAIRS FOR PUBLIC HIRE. V bo a,e pleased to see that Colwyn Bay now (wNu'8 °f. a couple Bath-chairs,, which stand 0 1 'heir attendants) on the main read just j^PPosite the Public Hall. We feel sure that they anH6 °nly to be known to be g'eatly appreciated much used. ANY VISITORS EXPFXTED AT COLWYN BAY.— ej{ ar&e influx of visitors into Colwyn Bay, is lar next week, as during the past week a and'6 number °f inquiries for rooms were made, t!'mea great many were secured for a considerable &AVN ^XC1T1NG SNAKE-ADVENTURE NEAR COLWYN tj, 'A vanman named J. Shaughnesy, who is in fur -ernP'°y Messrs Abraham and Mitchell, "lture-removers, was proceeding along the j>road between Colwyn Bay and Conway '.Se °n Sunday afternoon, July 22nd, when he s P'ed '•"> the disiace what appeared to be a large jt e- When Shaughnesy got near to the snake, cornnienced hissing at the intruder. The atter stopped the horses and tackled the reptile, r tit. I wriggled about on the ground with such kill H some f'me elapsed before it was w'tb a sharp piece of flint. The reptile "early four feet in length. THE^LWYN BAY GOLF CLUB.—The Secretary of Cha e?v'y"^ornred Club (Mr F. A; Dew, Llewelyn t{,e *?Pers, Colwyn Bay) asks us to announce that Prof are now open for play, and that the are ess'onal is in daily attenda nee. Visitors who the m?n?bers of other Clubs, are admitted to all the privileges of this Club at a subscription of five Ljni"nSs Pef week, or half-a-crown per day. The s are situated at the Rhos end of the town. & ST. ASAPH DIOCESAN SOCIETIES. S0cj annual meetings of the St Asaph Diocesan St A6, les' vvere held, in the new Chapter Library, ofcfS?P^> on Wednesday, July 25th, the Bishop ^A?aph presiding. | p3'1 J^saPb read the minutes of the ThC 1i:xtension Society, which were confirmed, of tie bishop, referring to the financial position extent c'ety> said they were in debt to the Vvj^ ,°* £ 600, which they must clear off if they in fto continue the work to the same extent be u'ure. Their income would also have to in' Increased by 3°° a year. 'The Society's had r 6 s'eadily increased during 1893, and in e<^ highest mark since its foundation Was n'tSO l'1at=t'le difficulty they now experienced ^burrV, ow'ng" to any decline in the generosity of debt 11me"' [Applause], With regard to the to hold a bazaar in the Palace e trusfS H" '^e A"gust to w'Pe °^' an(^ it, every Churchman would support 'Alices f'"R °f g'r:an,s' hve was sorry to say that Cautio ° Wlthdrawal had been sent out. as a pre- nary measure to the following parishes :— Brymbo, Rhosddu, Bala, Berriew, Berse-Drelin- C.d'urt, Cefn, Chirk, Deganwy, Denbigh, Flint, Holywell, Mostyn, Mold, Llanfaircaereinion, and Llanfairtalhaiarn. For himself, he was entirely opposed to these withdrawals, but he certainly thought that some of the parishes might give tnem larger contributions. He knew very well the difficulties experienced in poor parishes, but he thought every parish in the diocese should send up a contribution, if it was only 6d. [Hear, hear]. After some representations on behalf of the parishes in question, the matter was referred back, on the motion of Canon Owen, for the con- sideration of the Executive Committee. THE RAINFALL AT BRYN EURYN. I Diameter of Funnel, 5 inches. Rain Guage < Height"! Above ground, 1 foot. I of Top Above Sea Level, 125 feet. Readings taken at 9 a.m., daily. Month. Date. Depth. Remarks, Inches. July 17 0'17 11 18 o'o7 19 0'03 20 „ 21 0.41 11 22 11 23 0.01 CONGO METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATORY, COLWYN BAY. Week ending July 21st, 1894, 1-3 o Mean Temperature for the week 57'8 I Total Hours of Sunshine 28 hrs. 20 min. £ Maximum Temperature 68"2 Total Rainfall o'^6 in. g. Minimum Temperature 49'8 | -s Mean Maximum Minimum Daily Humidity. Sunshine. Rainfall. pr Temper- Temper- Temper- Per Inches. Wind. < ature. ature. ature. Cent. H. M. Sunday. 62*0 50*4 56'2 83 '11 Calm. Monday. 68'4 50*2 59'3 89 1 25 '02 S. Tuesday. 6yx 49'8 56^4 65 8 IS -16 S.W. 0^ 800 Wednesday. 62.5 52*3 57"4 84 5 25 '08 N.W. M 0 Thursday 64'8 51-8 58*3 74 6 o W. rn w Friday, 66'o 52 -o 59*0 63 4 15 S. cj 1-3 Saturday 63'9 52^6 58*3 84 3 o '09 N.W. 3 The humidity is given in percentages, 100 per cent. meaning that the air contains g; as much moisture as it can under the existing conditions of temperature and pressure. TIME OF FISHING AT THE ROYAL FISHERY. July, 1894. a.m. p.m. Friday 27 10.28. — Saturday 28 11.45.. Monday 30 — 2.0 Tuesday 31 — 2.30 August. Wednesday I 3.0 Thursday 2 — 3.50 Friday 3 — 4.30 Saturday 4 — .5.25 J. L. PARRY-EVANS. CRICKET. DINGLEWOOD v. EPWORTH COLLEGE.—This match was played on Saturday, July 21st, and resulted in a victory for Dinglewood. DINGLEWOOD. 1ST TNNINGS. 2ND INNINGS. T. J. Thomas, b Fraser 8 b Fraser 7 H. Ross, b Fraser o c Tew, b Mr Radcliffe o E. Battersfcy. b Mr Ratcliffe 4 b Mr Ratcliffe 3 Mr Stanley Wood, b Fraser 3 b'Fraser 5 Stuart Wood, c Ellesworth, b Mr Ratcliffe 7 b Fraser 6 H. E. Kincaid, bMrRadcliffe 6 c Roebuck, b Mr Ratcliffe 4 Mr Brindfcy, b Mr Radcliffe jo not out 44 R. Moore, not out 15 b Mr Radcliffe 4 H. Porrit, b Mr Ratcliffe 3 bMrRadcliffe. 9 A. Robinson, b Fraser 1 c and b Mr Radcliffe o Edg. Battersby, c & b Fraser 2 c Mr Mob, b Fraser I Extras (byes 6, wkts 1) 7 (byes). 7 Total 66 go EPWORTH COLLEGE. Mr Mole, c Ross, b Moore 2 Tew, b Moore o Mr Ross, b Thomas.. 0 Mr Radcliffe, cRoss, b Moore 6 Fraser, b Moore I Ellesworth, c and b Moore I Jones, b Moore. 0 Shannon (i), b Thomas 3 Shannon (2), c Kincaid, b Mcore I Judge, c Kincaid, b Thomas o Roebuck, not out Co Extras 0 Total I4 DINGLEWOOD 71. MR STUBB'S XI.—This match was played at Dinglewcod, on Monday, July 231 d, and resulted in a \ictory for Dinglewood. MR. STUBBS XI. 1ST INNINGS. 2ND INNINGS. Mr Hughes, b Moore I b Mocre I Mr Picrcy, c and b Thomas 8 absent. 0 Mr T;n"or, c Kincaid, b Moore 3 b Thcmas 2 Mr Black, b Thomas o absent. 0 Mr Stubbs, b Mcore 5 absent 0 Mr Geiman, b Mcore I c Battersliy, b Moore. 6 Mr Gil.'n-.an, c1 Kincaid, b Moore 0 absent o Rev J. Griffiths, absent o b Thcmas T. C. Arnfield, notout o b Moore Q H. Rjass, b Thcmas 2 c Mr Stanley Wood, b II Moore 0 O. B. Edwards, b Thomas o notout. 0 Extras (byes 5, wkts 1) 6 (byes 5, wkts 1) 6 Total 26 IS DINGLEWOOD. T.J. Thomas, b Mr Piercy 6 R. Travers, c Hughes, b Mr Piercy 13 H. E. Kincaid, b Mr Piercy 3 Ernest Battersfcy, c Mr Piercy, b Mr Black 45 Mr Stanley Wood. c H. Ross, b Mr Piercy 4 Mr Brindley, c Mr Black, b Mr Piercy 31 R. Moore, run out 3 H. Porritt, not out .15 A. Robinson, c and b Mr Piercy. o Edgar Battersbv. b Mr Piercy 4 R. S. Mather, c'Mr Hughes, b Mr Piercy 7 Extras (byes 10, wkts 3). 13 Total.144 DINGLEWOOD V COLWYN BAY COLLEGE.—This match was played at Dinglewcod, on Tuesday, July 24th, and resulted in a victory for Dinglewood. DINGLEWOOD. 1ST INNINGS. 2ND INNINGS. Mr Brindley, b Mr Carey 6 b Mr Grant .14 H. E. Kincaid, b Mr Carey 4 c R. Grant, bMr Carey.. 1 Mr S. Wood, c Mr Grant b R. Gant o b Mr Carey o E. Battersby, b R. Grant 6 b Mr Grant 6 T. J. Tnomas. b lVIr Carey. o run out 10 R. Moore, c Mr. Carey, R. Grant c & b Mr Grant 3 H. Porritt, ru t 2 b Mr Grant o A. Robinson, b Mr Carey I not out I Edg. Battersfcy, run cut I b Mr Grant o H. Ross, not out 12 b Mr Carey o T. "O. Airfield, run out 2 b Mr Carey o Extras (b 14, lb 3, w I)- 18 (b 18, lb 2) 20 Total 54 Total. 55 COLWYN BAY. 1ST INNINGS. 2ND INNINGS. Mr Grant, c & b Moore 23 b Moore 24 R. Grant, b Thomas o Ibw Moore 3 Mr Carey, run out I I b Battersby •• 4 C. Edwards, b Mcore ic Porritt, b Battersby o A. J. Toppin, b Thomas o b Moore .4 R. Willcocks, c Mr Stanley Wood, b Moore I C Arnfield, b Moore 6 H. Pollock," c Battersby, b Moore. 3 b Battersby o R. Birks, b Thomas.. 0 c Mr Brindley, b Moore.. o E. Page, b Moore. 1 b Moore .0 W. Bowness, c Arnfield, b Thcmas 0 b Battersby 2 W. Von Berg, not out o notout. o Extras (b 6) .6 (b 1, lb 1). 2 Total. 46 Total 41 THE TOWN BAND. To the Editor. SIR, — I don't possess any great knowledge of music, but I will venture to assert that Mr Schofield's Town Band is a good 'un. Their music has sfcveral times distinctly soothed my breast when it has been in savage mood. If your readers are of the same opinion, I would respect- fully beg to point out that musicians cannot live on the sweet strains they produce as a love-lorn swain can on his sonnet, but require copious doses of bread, cheese, mutton, potatoes, and other delicacies (they sometimes think they require beer, but that is a mistake). I have promised them half-a-guinea if they are here till the middle of September, and have advanced half the amount, and I would earnestly ask those who want the town to prosper, and who would be ashamed not to do their share, to contribute liberally. Also, I feel strongly that we cannot afford to patronise every fleeting show that comes our way, and that our whole energies should be thrown into the support of one good high-class concern like Mr Schofield's, well known to us and under the aegis of the local authority. Let the pennies, therefore, that would otherwise go to the organ-grinders and all other miscellaneous "musicians" who come round-including the Walking Wonder who plays six instruments (of cruelty) at a time,—be all saved up for that which alone of the whole crowd is an absolute necessity for our town, and which I think we have at last, -A Good Band. "-Yours obediently, MENDAX. Colwyn Bay, July 24th. MARRIAGE OF MISS WORSLEY, OF GOL- BORNE. & THE VICAR OF LLANDRILLO. Considerable interest was manifested at Gol- borne and Lowton, Lancashire, in the marriage of Miss Worsley, second daughter of the late Mr James WTorsley, The Grove, Lowton, to the Rev W. Venables-Williams, Vicar of Llandrillo (Col- wyn Bay), which happy event took place at St Luke's Church, Lowton, on Wednesday afternoon, July 18th, in the presence of a crowded congrega- tion. Extensive preparations had been made, including the laying of scarlet flannel from the gate to the door of the Church, this useful cover- ing afterwards being given to the poor. The bride, attired in a dress of gray bengaline silk, trimmed with Brussels lace, and carrying a magnificent bouquet, entered the Church on the arm of her brother, Mr J. E. Worsley, Winwick Cottage, by whom she was given away. Miss Elsie Worsley (daughter of Mr Ralph Leigh Worsley) was the bridesmaid, and Master Hugh Worsley (son ofMrJ. E. Worsley) ably discharged the duties of best man. The officiating clergy- man was the Rev Stanley Davies, M.A. Oxon., Vicar of Wrexham, who was assisted by the Rev R. Smith, Rector of Lowton. The service was choral, the singing of the beautiful sixty-seventh Psalm being entered into with much heartiness by the large congregation and by the members of the Choir. Mr James Prescott (the organist) pre- sided at the organ and gave appropriate selec- tions, the ''Wedding March" being played as the happy couple left the Church, amid the hearty good wishes of numerous friends. The festivities were worthily observed at Highfield House, the residence of Mr G. W. Rigg, brother-in-law to the bride. The guests were:-The officiating- Clergy, Mr and Mrs G. F. Watts (Manchester), Mr and Mrs S. S. Brown, Dr Worsley, Dr Montagu Venables-Williams (Colwyn Bav), Mr and Mrs Ralph Leigh Worsley, Mr J. E. Worsley, the Misses Clarke (Laurel House, Lowton), Miss Milligan (Marsden House, near Stockport), Miss Millicent Owen (Sale), and Master Hugh and Miss Elsie Worsley. The happy couple subsequently left for Leamington, en route for Devonshire. The equipages were supplied by Mr John Smith (Lowton), and the wedding cake was r, om the well-known establishment of the Misses Rimmell, Stockwell, Manchester. The following was the list of presents :—• Mr and Mrs G. IV. Higg, writing table. Mrs Rips1, brass set for writing table. Mr and Mrs Watts, Brussels lace for bride's dress, and cheque. Children of Mr and Mrs R. Leigh Worsley, silver flower vase. Mr and Mrs Edmondson, silver pepper and salt pots, breakfast tray and cloth. Mr and Mrs Harrison, case of silver serviette rings and silver i- cent bottles. Miss Millig-an, Lug-e painted vase and oil painting. Miss Clarke, white afternoon tea cloth. Miss L. Clarke. painting of Lowton Church. Nurse Shepherd, brass matchbox and penwiptr Miss Taylor. Royal Worcester vase. Mrs Morland Crossfield, pokerwork table. Mr and Mrs E. L. Worsley, antique silver cream jus- Mrs and Miss Darwell, Worcester chii a, afternoon tea dish. Mr Hcdding-, silver-fitted 1r[]velJing- bag. Mr and Mrs Brown, silver-mounted scent bottles. Miss Saunder, glass rose bowl. Servants and coachman at Highfield House, work case and set of scissors. Mrs Si ton, bla( k ]ace fan. Miss Leete. lace pocket-handkerchief. Mrs Tweedle, ecru lace work. Mrs Milligan, drawn iiiien and lace bed spread. Mr W. and Mrs H. A. Tinker, Venetian glass bottles. Mr and Mrs Tirker, cheque. Miss Tavies. cushion. Miss Sf encer, letter weights. Miss M. Owen, china flower vases. Miss Farrison. table centre aT d brooch. Mr and Mrs F. Milligan, silver flower pot. Miss Robinson, silver cake knife. Rev and Mis Spencer, gold pencil case. Scott. Rigg and party, cut glass jug. Miss Mapnull, brass blotter. Mr Bostofk, Polwyn Bay, cheque. Mr and Mrs E. Hewitt, royal Worcester vases. Mr Porter. Colwyn Pay. cheque. IMr B. Milligan, silver flower pot. Pr Worsley, pair of repousse sconces. Mr J. K. Worsley, Apostle spoon. Miss Bridge, wedgwood jug. Mr Janifg Porter. Conway. cheque. Coriway, flower stand, Mrs Alexander, purse. Captain and Mrs Ruker, silver photo frame. Master Hugh Worsley. work case. Misses Norridge Dresden, china lamp. DEATH OF MR W. G. PREECE, SHREWSBURY. The following is abridged from The Shrewsbury Chronicle of July 201b :—It is with great regret we have to announce the death of Mr William Good- win Preece, auctioneer, which took place at the residence of his daughters, Hawkestone, Colwyn Bay, on Saturday last, at the age of 71, having been born on the 15th July, 1823. As an auctioneer Mr Preece was well and widelv known, and at one time he held the foremost rank as a seller of sheep, his judgment and discretion being much sought after. Few men possessed a higher knowledge of the various breeds, and the eloquence he displayed when decanting upon the qualities of the ware under his hammer invariably drew forth large bids from those assembled near him. In his way he was somewhat of a figure, and his manly appearance, strong voice, and de- termined will never failed to take effect. Mr Preece commenced business as an auctioneer in 1845, having previously been engaged in farming with his father, who held a farm at Quatt, near Bridgnorth, where he was born. Several special sheep sales were instituted at The Flash, near Coton Hill. Sales were also held at Worcester in 1853 to 1856 and after con- sent was given to hold sales by auction in Shrews- bury Smithfield these sales became the chief and practically only means for the disposal of pedigree Shropshires. These sales have been held up to the present day. As an instance of the values of Shropshires in the fiftees, prices frequently ranged between 40gs. and Sogs. for rams, and it is within memory that ewes realised 8gs. per head. Mr Preece was the first to originate the Special Prize Christmas Fat Stock Auctions, held now-a- days all over the country, his first prize auction having been held at The Flash in 1855, when prizes were awarded for the best fat animals included in the sale. He was recognised as an admirable judge of all things agricultural, bot-h stock and land, and during a long career had earned the respect of a large circle of friends. The funeral arrangements were carried out by Messrs Martin, Billinger & Co. (Pride Hill, Shrewsbury, late Birch Leigh & Co.), the massive oak coffin, which was fitted with heavy brass mountings, being furnished by Messsrs Allen, of Colwyn Bay, who arranged for the transfer of the remains to Shrewsbury on Monday last. The coffin, by kind consent of the Vicar and Church- wardens, was, on arrival at Shrewsbery, conveyed to Holy Trinity Church, where Mr Preece had been a regular attendant. The funeral took place on Tuesday, July 17th, at the General Cemetery, and was conducted by the Rev T. Holmes, the first portion of the service being held at Trinity Church, where, among others, the following attended :—Mr W. G. Preece, Mr E. G. Preece (sons), Mr G. O. Meredith and Mr Charles Dayus (brothers-in-law), Mr R. Preece (cousin) A large quantity of beautiful wreaths entirely covered the coffin. Many letters expressing regret at inability to attend on so short a notice were received. The deceased expressed a strong- wish that the funeral should be a strictly quiet one. We understand that business arrangements were made sometime ago, whereby his eldest son, Mr IN. G. Preece, junr., will continue the business under the style of Mr W. G. Preece and Son. AT THE WELL OF ST. TRILLO. Along a main road, through a stile Across a meadov-a very good mile- We took our morning walk. Passed we to the end of the bay; Just round the point, a little way, The subject of our talk: The ruins of an ancient shrine, Whose founder on scant fare did dine A pious man was he. His name's now famous as St. Trillo, You have it also in Llandrillo, A village by the sea. This shrine stands open to the shore, It ever hears the ocean's roar, Bnt 'midst snug greenery. A tiny Chapel here was raised, A sparkling stream its walls encased— The water still flows free. A single room of narrow space, The walls you plainly yet may trace, Now open to the air. A vaulted roof of stone o'erhead Has long since been demolished; The place, it needs repair. St. Trillo lived in penury— It was in the sixth century- I trow his wants were few. But lovely was the spot he chose To count his heads, to tell his vows, By night or morning dew. No doubt he sacred made the well, And healing virtue—who can tell r- Mayhap its water had. Now the spot is wreck and ruin, With better waters at Trefrwyn, If you feel very bad. But the draught good St. Trillo gave Was meant, they say, poor souls to save In that far distant age. It was a time when thought was dim, When symbols taught the love of Him, Instead of printed page. Here 'twas that lone monk dwelt, they say, For his own good and men's to pray, And simple lessons teach And sinners came o'er moor and fell, And hope-drew from that sacred well That trickled by the beach. Though ruined now St. Trillo's cell, Sweet Nature's growth adorns the shell L .1 That keeps the sacred fount; iuin pilgrims reaon it, as or yore, And health drink in along the shore That skirts the Euryn mount. The mount wis there in Trillo's day; Unchanged, too, that lovely bay .1 Close by the western tide; And mercy comes to-day. as then, To Weary souls and stricken men, Through Him, the-Cr icified. C in The Leeds Mercury We My Supplement (July 14th, 1894).

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