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TO THE EDITOR OF THE PRINCIPALITY.

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EXTRAORDINARY SCENE AT NEWCASTLE. Mr. Justice Wightman, though presiding at Nisi Prius, was, from the want of civil business, assisting Mr. Justice Cresswell in the trial of prisoners, and on the day now in question a most terrible murder was tried before him. The whole case had been gone through, the defence was closed, the Judge had charged the jury, and they had retired to consider of their verdict. The Judge wished to take this opportunity of con- sulting his colleague upon a point of law which had arisen during the trial the door, however, by which Mr. Justice Wightman was to reach the other court, in which Mr. Justice Cresswell was then presiding, was found to be locked. The trial had naturally created great excitement among the public. There was a solemn pause and hush among the anxious crowd as they were expecting, in breathless suspense, the awful verdict upon which the fate of the culprit in the dock depended. He, indeed, was in an agony of terror, and mind and body were both almost entirely prostrate from the dread trial to which they had been subjected. And yet this was the precise moment chosen for the enactment of another scene, which, in England we are glad to say, can seldom have been paralleled. Every avenue to the court was crowded with persons awaiting the verdict. For the Judge to have passed through such a crowd in order to reach the opposite court was next to impossible, and it would certainly have been highly indecorous to subject His Lordship to such an unseemly crushing as would have been inevitable, had he attempted to reach Mr. Justice Cress- well's court through the public avenue. In this state of things, and being anxious to have the benefit of Mr. Justice Cresswell's opinion, Mr. Justice Wightman commanded the door which led into the grand jury-room to be opened. This door was locked, and the Justices of the Peace for the county were, it seems, at that moment in solemn conclave in this room. It would appear, also, that there are some disputes between the rival justices of the county and borough upon some matter connected with this room, and the county justices, in support of what they supposed to be their right, determined to fasten the door, and peremptorily refused to open it when commanded to do so by the Judge of Assize, at that solemn moment, and for the important purpose of enabling him to consult his colleague on a point of law affecting the life of a fellow-creature. The Judge, surprised and angry, (that is, if it be possible for Mr. Justice Wightman. to be angry), commanded the High L Sheriff to open the door, and, if necessary, to break it open. Upon this the county justices, with a Sir Charles Monck at their head, appeared in court and the subjoined dialogue is said to have followed His Lordship At present, I, being one of the justices of the assize for the county of Northumberland, as well as for the town and county of Newcastle, propose to have sufficient access to this court, and I propose to have that door opened. Sir C. Monck We can't have it open, His Lordship But I will have it open, and I will fine any one who opposes its being opened. Sir C. Monck Then we must leave it to your Lordship's discretion to fine us. We can't have it opened. His Lordship Then I desire that the door be left open. Sir C. Monck We can't have it my Lord. We are using it ourselves. The Queen's justices are using it. His lordship But I supersede your authority. Sir C. Monck We can't have it. We are sitting in petty sessions. "His Lordship: Then I shall order the High Sheriff to open that door. I am here on the county business under the Queen's commission. "Sir C. Monck: That room can't be made a lobby or a passage. His Lordship Suppose I wish to consult with my brother Cresswell, as I do in this case ? Sir C. Monck There is a way out round (pointing to the ordinary passages of the court, which were densely crowded). His Lordship Oh, round there. I cannot enter into this unseemly dispute. You will at your peril refuse what I have requested. Sir C. Monck We did not raise the dispute. His Lordship Yes, you are doing so. "Sir C. Monck Well, if you choose to exercise your authority, you must do so. • ^|on*ship; Then, perhaps, the better way would be, instead of your raising this unseemly noise of the High Sheriff breaking open the door by my order, that you should now make all the protest you can and retire. Sir C. Monck Oh, no, that won't do; we are using the room. His Lordship I wish at this moment to pass through. Sir C. Monck Specially we will permit it. His Lordship Is the High Sheriff here ? The High Sheriff here stepped forward, and preceding His Lordship, led the way through the disputed door, followed by his Lordship." The persons who, upon this occasion, abetted Sir C. Monck in this outrageous proceeding, with Sir Charles Monck him- self, are evidently no longer fit to remain in the commission of the paice.-limes.

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_U--IHOUSE OF LOllDS.-THuRsDA…

HOUSE OF COMMONS.—THURSDAY,…

HOUSE OF LORDS,—FRIDAY, AUGUST…

HOUSE OF COMMONS.—FRIDAY,…

HOUSE OF COMMONS.—SATURDAY…

HOUSE OF LORDS.—MONDAY AUG.…

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