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GLAMORGANSHIRE SUMMER ASSIZES.

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DEATH OF KIRBY, THE ENTOMOLOGIST. We regret to announce the death of the Rev. William Kirby, M.A., rector of Barham, Suffolk, at that place, where he had resided 68 years, on Thurs- day, July 4, in the 91st year of his age. Mr; Kirby was Honorary President of the Entomological Society of London, President of the Ipswich Museum, and Fellow of the Royal, Linnean, Zoological, and Geological Societies, besides being honorary member of several foreign societies, and has left be- hind him an imperishable name as one of the first entomologists of this or any age. This title he would have assured to himself had he written no other work than his Monographia Apum Angliae," published in 1801, in two volumes, 8vo., in which, from materials almost wholly collected by himself, and the plates of which were mostly etched by his own hand (having taken lessons in the art for this express purpose), he described upwards of 200 of the wild bees of this country, with a large- ness and correctness of view as to their family (or as they are now considered, generic) divisions, that excited the warmest admiration of British and foreign entomologists. But when to this great work we add his other entomological labours—his numerous and valuable papers in the "Transactions of the Linnean Society;" the Introduction to Entomology," written in conjunction with Mr. Spence the entomological portion of his Bridgewater Treatise On the History, Habits, and In- stincts of Animals and his description (occupying a quarto volume), of the insects of the "Fauna Boreali Americana" of Sir John Richardson it will be evident how largely and successfully he has contributed to the extension of his favourite science f and all this without encroaching in the slightest de- gree on his professional or social duties, for, while ranking so high as an entomologist, he was, during his long life, a most exemplary and active clergyman, beloved by his parishioners of all. ranks, and one of the warmest of friends, and most simple-minded, kÜfd-hearted, and pious of. men.- Gardener's Chronicle»• FUNERAL OF THE DUKE OF CAMBRIDGE. The interment of his late Royal Highness the Duke of Cam- brdge, took place on Tuesday morning, in a vault beneath Kew Church. The outer coffin was, on Monday night, conveyed from Messrs. Bantings, in St. James's-street (who, as the undertakers to the royal family, have the superintendence of the funeral), to Cambridge-house, where it received the inner shell containing the royal remains, and was finally screwed down. At five o'clock in the morning a guard of honour, composed of a company of the Coldstream Guards (the late duke's regiment), mounted in the court yard of Cambridge-house, from whence the funeral procession moved at the early hour of six o'clock, in the follow- ing order — A guard of honour mounted in the court-yard, in front of Cam- bridge-house-the Coldstream Guards. A mourning coach, drawn by four horses, conveying four of the medical attendants upon his late Royal Highness. A mourning coach, drawn by four horses, conveying medical attendants and chaplains to his late Royal Highness. A mourning coach, drawn by four horses, conveying the Equerry of her Royal Highness the Duchess of Gloucester, the Equerry of her Royal Highness the Duchess of Kent, and two Equerries of his late Royal Highness. A mourning coach, drawn by four horses, conveying three Equerries of his late Royal Highness. A. mourning coach, drawn by four horses, conveying the Equerry of his Majesty the King of Hanover, the Representative of the Hanoverian Embassy, and the Groom in Waiting, and tiie Equerry of her Majesty the Queen. A mourning coach, drawn by four horses, conveying the Lord in Waiting to the Queen and two of the bearers of the pail. A mourning coach, drawn by four horses, conveying the Vice Chamberlain of her Majesty's Household, and two of the bearers of the pall. The carriage of his late Royal Highness, drawn by six horses, conveying the coronet and cushion and the baton and cushion of his late Royal Highness. THE HEARSE, Drawn by eight horses. Hiss Royal Highness Prince Albert, his Royal Highness the Hereditary Grand Duke of Mecklenburg Sterelitz, with their attendants, and the Lord Chamberlain of her Majesty's House- s hold, met the funeral at the residence of his late Hoyal Highness, on Kew-grcen. Upon the arrival, at the residence on Kew-green, the body was removed from the hearse, and those who had accompanied it from London quitted the carriages in which they had been conveyed, and the procession to the church was formed in due order. Upon arrival at the church, the body was placed upon tressels in front of the communion table, and the coronet and cushion, and the baton and cushion laid thereon. His Royal Highness (Prince George) the Chief Mourner, his Royal Highness Prince Albeit, and his Royal Highness the Hereditary Grand Duke of Mecklenburg StreUtz, took their places at the head of the corpse, the Lord Chamberlain and Vice Chamberlain, and the Gentleman Usher of the Sword of State, at the feet of the corpse. The other persons composing the procession remained in the royal gallery and in pews provided for them in the church. The burial service was read by one of his late Royal High- ness's chaplains, the vicar of the parish of Kew, being in his place at the communion. The part of the service before the interment being read, the body was borne to the vault at the entrance to the chapel, fol- lowed by his Royal Highness the chief mourner, by Prince Albert, the Hereditary Grand Duke of Mecklenburgh Strelitz, the Lord Chamberlain, &c., and was deposited therein. After the Chief Mourner, Prince Albert and the Hereditary Grand Duke of Mecklenburgh Srtelitz was conducted by the Lord Chamberlain of her Majesty's household out of the church, followed by their attendants and others present at the solemnity. A Guard of Honour was mounted in front of the church -the Coldstream Guards.

TO THE EDITOR OF THE PRINCIPALITY.

THE COUNTY COAL WEIGHING MACHINES.

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