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THE DISTRESS.

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RATE-TN-AID (IRELAND) BILL.

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RATE-TN-AID (IRELAND) BILL. The report on this bill was brought up and ordered to be received. THE DISTURBANCES IN CANADA. Lord STANLEY asked if the Government had received any further information with regard to events in Canada, than had been received by the usual sources of public information and whether the Government had received any information as to the outbreak in that colony of the most formidabie of all wars —a war of races P Whether they had given any instructions to the Governor as to his conduct, or whether he acted without instructions, or with instruc- tions, the Government were responsible. Earl GREY had received a dispatch from Lord Elgin, which, when the House next met. he would lay on the table of the House. It showed that Lord Elgin had acted throughout with his accus- tomed judgment, prudence, and good sense. That dispatch was vvntteu on the 30th of April. It appeared that a serious riot had taken place in Montreal, and the Parliament. House had been burnt. He had no reason to apprehend that there was any war of races, on the contrary, he believed tranquillity had been restored. He was prepared to take ail the responsibility that belonged to his office, but he believed that the responsibility rested as much with the noble lord as with any other person, for the proceedings in the House hud contributed in no slight degree to exacerbate the i;i- feelings in that colony, and lie trusted the ncble loid would re- member that there was a responsibility attaching to the opposition. Lord STANLEY said that no Government had ever profited more by the responsibility resting on an opposition than the Government oppooiite; but no taunts or invectives would induce him to cease to exercise that liberty of speech which was the privilege of everv member of their lordships' House and he would repeat, was Lord Elgin left to act on his own judgment, or had he instructions from the Government ? Ei,rl Gti,y thought it. would be inexpedient to enter into exola- nations until the dispatch was laid on the table. With respect the Indemnity Bill, he had advisedly left Lord Elgin to tiie exer- cise of his own judgment. His rule was in such cases always to leave the Governors of colonies to act in this manner, and to trans- mit the Bills to the Government, with any reports thsy may think proper thereon, for the consideration of the Government.

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