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THE DISTRESS.

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THE DISTRESS. The Central Relief Committee have this day issued a long address, appealing to the public for countenance and support in their endeavours to mitigate the terrible misery which threatens to devastate at least one-third of the population of this ill-fated country. This document, which is of consider- able length, does not bear a favourable contrast with the admirable report recently put forward by the Society of Friends, the former being the merest verbiage, destitute of all suggestion, and remarkable only for turgid declamation, while the latter bore the impress of genuine philanthropy and a cordial desire to work, not talk, practically and ear- nestly, in order to improve the social condition of their poorer fellow countrymen. The members of the Relief Com- mittee seem to be quite hopeless of individual exertion being zn able to accomplish anything, and entertaining this view, they propose that a deputation shall proceed to England, provided with a statement, now in progress of being digested, to be laid before the Prime Minister, so as to ascertain what fate is in store for the perishing people of Ireland." Possibly," they add, the deputation may succeed in obtaining access to her most gracious Majesty's presence." HARVEST PROSPECTS—THE POTATO. All things considered, the agricultural reports of the state of.the growing crops are tolerably favourable, and as the weather, with the drawback of the continued prevalence of an ungenial easterly wind, remains dry and bright, there is, at least, ground for hope that the coming harvest may prove to be more productive than could have been expected from .the nature of the accounts representing the vast quantities of land thrown out of cultivation this year. As previously mentioned, in some districts the peasantry, with a blind fa- iuity, have again staked their all in the prospect of a profit- able prospect of a potato crop, and again are the symptoms apparent of their hopes being disappointed by a fourth failure, which, if realised, must lead to results far more disas- trous than any that have yet been experienced. JUDGMENT ON THE WRIT OF ERROR. The intelligence of the Lords' judgment, sealing the fate of the State prisoners, reached Dublin early in the forenoon of Saturday: and, although few persons anticipated any other issue to the final appeal, the speedy decision arrived at by their lordships created great surprise among all parties here. Judging in a great measure by the time-honoured practice of the Irish law courts, it was not considered possible that the "talk" could be exhausted for the botter portion of a week. The authorities at Richmond Bridewell are in hourly ex- pectation of an order for the transmission of the prisoners from their custody previous to their final departure from Ire- land. Nothing certain is yet known of the ultimate inten tions of Government. When the news of the judgment was announced on Saturday morning to Messrs. O'Brien and Mcaglier, they heard it with the utmost indifference, and ad- mitted they were prepared for no other result. Indeed, the four prisoners were quite cheerful, and in the enjoyment of excellent health, with the exception of O'Donoghue, who is labouring under slight indisposition.

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A MODERN SUCCESSOR OF THE…

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RATE-TN-AID (IRELAND) BILL.

NAVIGATION-LAWS AND AGRICULTURAL…