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THE VERDICT. *

TRIAL AND .CONVICTION OF ANN…

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Family Notices

■ THE TRIAL OF RUSH.

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'n — 4m, ■ -— =■ in Norwich. But as it grew again he abandoned it but made no secret of its possession. Chestney first swore that she could not distinguish the man, and subsequently that it was him. Could they believe her?—They could not convict a man of murder upon such testimony. It was said the murderer carried his head aside. Did no other man do so ? Stress had been laid upon the shape of the bullets. It was notorious that bul- lets after they had been once fired lost their original shape. Considering the darkness of the night, the murder could not have been committed in double the time he was out; when he was well known to the servants at StanfLld Hall, was it likely he would have gone th 're. It was absurd to suppose that Siiidford, an educated person, would have witnessed the deeds. The prisoner was proceeding with his defence, when the judge said, that as the jury appeared quite fatigued by their long sitting, he wished to know how long the prisoner's defence was likely to last ? The prisoner said, some hours longer. In consequence the Court, at eight o'clock, adjourned—the prisoner having been about ten hours and a half OIl his legs. On Wednesday, Rush continued his defence. lie said the nature of his relations in respect of property with Mr. Jermy •wei\; such that it was to his interest that he should live, rather than die. If he had intended to commit the horrible crime of murder, did they think he would have hid Emily Sandford at -l'otitsh ? She said he trembled. He did; as, from what he had heard at the Hall, and his differences with the family, he feared he should be suspected but when he went to bed he was as lirm as at that moment. His conscience accused him of no guilt. God Almighty if I had done such a thing, I -eould not have looked you in the face—I should have been mal by this time." The coat he had o* :t night of the mur- der he had buried in the pig stye, knowing that he should be suspected (sensation). He should produce it. Mrs. Jermy said the murderer w ire a yrrey coat, not a cloak, and differed altogether from Watson. They could not believe such contm- d ctory statements, nor convict him upon them. He implored them to take ample time to consider their verdict—the impro- bability of his being the murderer—for the sake of his dear young children, now bunting with suspense, who were desti- tute of a mother, and who prayed they would give them back their father. If condemned, the time would come when his innocence would b^ manifest. Might God give them wise un- derstanding to s?e his guihletssuess, and*to -return a verdict of Not Guilty. Rush finished at twelve o'clock. He called the following evidence :— Mr. Waugh, a solicitor, said 'he would not believe Howe on his oath, unless supported by respectable testimony. The lad Savory proved the littering of the straw some time 4) fore the murder. That the boots worn by Rush that night were left to dry at the fire. Sat up one night to watch for poachers. Saw Rush last at half-past saven. Last time he 'B.l\ him that night he had his in-door dress on. By the Judge; He got the boots at half-past five. He washed them and put them at the fire, where they remained till he gave them to the police. Mr. Hyde, accountant, swore that Howe had jocularly offered to give evidence on either side for twenty pounds. At this stage the prisoner not being able to obtain material facts in his favour, g st into a passion, exclaiming, What is the use of calling more witnesses when new ones are called at the last moment. I don't want to ask any more questions. Nor do I want any more witnesses." He then sat sulkily down, having previously intimated that tit" pig had destroyed the coat to which he had ref erred. M Bylç", rooo at three o'clock to reply, and in an a' ie speech scattered to the winds the weak defence of the pri- soner. In the course of its delivery he was repeatedly and vio- lently interrupted by the prisoner, which caused his lordship to order his removal; promising to be quiet. lie was allowed to remain, yet he at times interfered throughout its whole de- livery, but with modified violence. He concluded shortly after five. Mr. Baron Rolfe commenced summing up the evidence about six o'clock. He had spoken about an hour at the time the dis- patches left Norwich (half-past six o'clock, Wednesday even- ing), and said that. he should occupy two or three hours more ..in its delivery.