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THREATENING LETTERS TO THE…

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HOUSE OF LORDS.—THURSDAY,…

HOUSE OF COMMONS.—THURSDAY,…

HOUSE OF LORDS.—FRIDAY, MARCH…

ARMISTICE BETWEEN AUSTFJA…

HOUSE OF COMMONS.—FRIDAY,…

NAVAL EXPENDITURE-EXCESS.

RATE-IN-AID (IRELAND) BILL.

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RATE-IN-AID (IRELAND) BILL. The adjourned debate on the second reading of this bill was re- sumed by Mr. NAPIER, who opposed the bill, arguing the subject, first, as a question of rating; secondly, as a question of taxation. Mr. Napier concluded an effective speech with an examination of the scheme of Sir R. Peel. pointing out some of the practical difficulties it would encounter. Sir H, PEEL, after paying a very high compliment to the able and temperate speech of Mr. Napier, said it was because he wished to make some observations upon the general social condition of Ireland, rather than upon the measure under consideration, that he rose at that moment. Having explained the motives of his former vote upon this question, and stated the position of Ireland with reference to the obligations she had contracted towards England, and the injustice which, in some respects, had been done to her, giving her credit for the fidelity she had shown generally to her allegiance in the recent outbreak, he laid down the broad doc- trine that it was the manifest interest of this country to mitigate the afflictions of Ireland and to provide a remedy tor her evils. 'He drew a picture of the social condition of the provinces of Con- naught and Munster, and the county of Donegal, at the present time, and, going back to the year 1844, before the famine, and during the system of protection, compared it with a corresponding description in Lord Devon's report of the miserable state of tne labouring poor. lie then read documentary evidence of the pro- strate condition of landed property and of nominal proprietors in Ireland in the same year—a state of things, he observed, which could benefit neither the landholder, the encumbrancer, nor the country. These evils had been fearfully aggravated by the famine, combined with the operation of the Poor-law and he showed the oppressive weight with which this law had fallen upon certain unions, whole baronies being alleged to be waste, and solvent estates becoming responsible for insolvent ones. What was to be the result of this state of thing,;? Every acre of land thrown out of cultivation exasperated the evil. A prosperous potato harvest would afford only a temporary relief, but would ultimately per- petuate the evil, which could only be cured by the gradual intro- duction of a cereal crop. By what means could this substitution, which must be a slow and difficult process, be effected P It was the interest of Great Britain, if Ireland manifested a disposition to make great exertions, to bear her portion of the cost of a vigorous effort to relieve the landed property of Ireland, especially that which was under the superintendence of the Courts of Chancery and Exchequer. He had, the ot her night, suggested a commission, and subsequent reflection had induced him to think this the best course. He would advise that the commission, to be appointed by the Crown, composed of men upon whom the Government could rely, should examine the state of the distressed unions on the spot, which would enable them to suggest practical measures of ame- lioration and he would place under the charge of the commis- sioners public works and all measures proposed for that object, and recommend to their consideration the policy of diminishing the pressure of distress, where there was a congestion of popula- tion, by a wholesome system of emigration. In his opinion, how- ever, all measures w< uld be ineffectual unless the monstrous evils arising from the condition of landed property were cured, and that it would be of inestimable advantage to Ireland, to the nominal owner, to the encumbrancer, and to everybody except the receivers of the Court of Chancery and the lawyers, if. consistently with equity, estates could be relieved of their encumbrances, by facili- tating their voluntary transfer to men of capital, within the just principles laid down by Lord Cottenham, by authorising the commissioners to sell estates in heavy arrear for Poor-rates. Sir Robert sketched, with more distinctness than he had before done, the outlines of his plan, and with respect to the Poor-law, he strongly recommended recurring to the wise principle of the Act of 1H38, restoring the local guardians and substituting the only effective test of destitution, that of the workhouse. Mr. It. A. S. ADAIR supported the bill. If he thought the rate would be extended beyond two years he would not support the measure; and he thought the country was entitled to all assurance that measures should be forthwith introduced that would mate- rially diminish the evils of Ireland within that period. Captain BATESON protested against this most unjust, impolitic, and unconstitutional measure. Ireland wanted a firm, vigorous, and honest Government, security for life and property, and a just Poor Law. w.th a law of settlement. Mr, GHATTAN opposed the bill, it being in evidence that the Poor Law had totally failed, and that this rate-in-aid would not meet the case. On the motion of Mr. BRIGHT, the debate was again ad- journed. The House adjourned at a quarter after twelve o'clock until Monday.

HOUSE OF LORDS.—MONDAY, APRIL…

HOUSE OF COMMONS.—MONDAY,…

THE IRISH CHURCH.

COLONIAL POLICY.

COLLECTION OF THE MALT-TAX.

RUSSIA AND TURKEY.

PUBLIC BUSINESS.

SUPPLY.

RATE-IN-AID (IRELAND) BILL.

HOUSE OF LORDS.—TUESDAY, APRIL…