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SECOND DETAINER AGAINST THE…

GOItllAM v. THE BISHOP OF…

SECESSION OF THE .REV. JOII…

[No title]

HOUSE OF COMMONS.—TUISDAY,…

HOUSE OF COMMONS.—WEDNESDAY,…

FINANCIAL REFORM.

SMALL DEBTS (IRELAND) BILL.

.INSOLVENT MEMBERS BILL.

HOUSE OF LORDS,—'THURSDAY,…

HOUSE OF COMMONS.—THURSDAY,…

MOLDAVIA AND WALLACHIA.

HOVSE OF LORDS.—FRIDAY, MARCTI…

HOUSE OF COMMONS.—FRIDAY,…

NEW MEMBERS.

PETITIONS.

MUTINY BILL.

THE NAVIGATION LAWS.

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THE NAVIGATION LAWS. On the motion for the House gOlllg into committee on this bilJ, Mr. CLAY, Mr. WAWN, and Mr. HEIIRIES presented petitions against the bill. Mr. LABOUCHKIIE said that he proposed to make an important alteration in the bill. Since he had introduced the bill he had had an interview with the chairman of the Board of Customs, and had been informed that a great diminution of the revenue would take place if foreign vessels were permitted to take a part in the coast- ing trade of this country in the limited manner which he had pro- posed by the bill. The chairman of Customs was of opinion that it would be prejudicial to the revenue to permit either foreign or British vessels to combine the coasting with the foreign trade, and he had th-rotore come to the determination of abandoning that part of tiie bill. The bill would, therefore, be very much in the same as it was when it. was before the House hist year. ilir. HUME wished to know .whether or not the difficulty would not be got over if the trade was opened entirely. Mr. LAUOUCHEIIE said, if the restrictions on the coasting trade were done away with entirely, the cifficulty could be obviated, but he Was not then prepared to go that length. Mr. GLADSTONE said that he thought the right hon. gentleman1 was more successful in justifying the conclusion to which he now: came, than he was in establishing grounds for .having introduced the provision now withdrawn from the bill. He would nvail him- self, of thatlOpportunity ui stating, that although he had expressed, his opinion .that conditional legislation on the subject would be preferable to that proposed by the bill, still he did not intend to propose an amendment in committee to that effect. After a few words from Mr. HERHIES, Mr. Itoij! NSON stated his intention to oppose the third reading of it. Jle H9use then went into committee on the bill, ,when MlyLrt £ 3pi;cHKR.u proposed the introduction of words into the first,clause, to the effect that the bill should come into effect on .tire 1st January, 1850, which was agreed Lv. The first clause Inivnig been read, Mr. liouvKRiE rose to move the addition of a proviso to the clause of which he had given notice. The proviso, which was of ^considerable length, ,was to the effect-that the existing restrictions and prohibitions with regard to the .export or .import of goods or passengers by foreign vessels' shuuld- remain in force till it had appeared to the satisfaction of her Majesty in Privy Council.and declare*} j,y or(|erjn Council, that jBi'itish ships in such foreign coun rie< were not objected to the like restrictions and prohibi- ). q gers. The hon. gentleman contended that the effect of his pro- viso would be to force foreign countries to remove their restric- tion*. He felt satistied that the adoption of bis proviso would secure to the country great national advantages. He had altoge- ther excluded the colonial coasting trade, beiieving that the colo- nies were best cpnliiied to legislate for them wives. MR. \VI.,SO.N opposed the introduction of the proviso, because he believsJ on examination of the existing laws of other cou.itries it would be found utterly impossible to carry it i.ito operation. There wai in fact no country in the whole of Europe to which Mr. Bouverie's proviso could be properly applied, as no one country had precisely the same restrictions or applied them exactly in the same way. The hon. gentleman instanced the case of Belgium, which, without having almost any continental trade, had a large number of commercial restrictions, <\11,1 would probably be dis- posed to step in and demand from England the being placed upon terms of equality with other nations in the event of these restric- tions being done away with. To these reasons he should feel com- pelled to vote against the introduction of the proviso. Tiie committee divided, and the proviso was negatived by a majority of 132 to 15. Tne clauses up to 14 were then agreed to without any op- position, with the exception of those relating to the coasting trade, which were struck out on the motion of Mr. Labouohere. Mr. GLA IKSTO.VE moved the omission of clause 11, the sub- stitution of a clause which would taice from the colonial legis- lature the power of opening the inter-colonial navigation to, foreign ships, and giving the power to the Queen in council to make any regulations that might be necessary for that pnrpo.se, on receiving an address from the colony to that effect. Sir H. PlEr. opposed the amendment of Mr. Gladstone, as taking out of the hands of the colonial legislature a power wuich it was their legitimate right to exercise. The committee then divided, and the clause as proposed by the Government was agreed to by a majority of 158 to 10 i. Clause 15 was agreed to. Oil Clause 16, wnich rotated to the manning of British Slill pl, being proposed, Air. HA.STIE proposed au amendment to reiievethe British ship- owner from the restrictions which were at present imposed tioun him with regard to the manning of his vessels with English, sailors. After some discussion the committee again divided, and the amendment was negatived by 197 to 53. On the next clause being read, Mr. DISUAELI rose and attacked the loose and bungling man- ner in wh.cii the Government had brought, forward tile present measure, which they had introduced in a hasty and ill-considered condition, as was evidenced in their having that night abandoned a most important portion of it. lIe then proceeded to dis- cuss the general policy of the Government, and contended that it had ruined the agricultural interest, destroyed their colonial prosperity, and would ultimately inflict a serious injury uooti the shipping and commercial interests. 1 Mr. GLADSTONE gave his adhesion t ) the free-trade policy of the Government, which, under the mercy of God, had been the means of averting the horrors of famine in that eventful period through which they had just passed. Mr. LABOUCHEUE complained of the unusual course pursued by Mr. Disraeli in getting up a discussion which should have taken place before going into committee, and assured him that, undis- mayed by his taunts and sarcasms, the Government would steadily iollow up the policy they had hitherto pursued. The House then resumed, and the chairman reported progress, and asked leave to sit again on iVIondaj. The other orders of the day were then disposed of, and the House adjourned at one o'clock.

HOUSE OF LORDS.—MONDAY, MAIICII…

HOUSE OF COMMONS.—MOXDAY,…

THE NAVIGATION LAWS.

THE REV. JAMES SHORE.