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Y TRAETHODYDD, for January,…

SOCIETY OF ANCIENT BRITONS.

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SOCIETY OF ANCIENT BRITONS. The anniversary festival of the Most Hon. and Loyal So- ciety of Ancient Britons was held on Thursday, at the Free- masons' Tavern, and the occasion was celebrated with an amount of observance and enthusiasm which reflects honour upon the national spirit of Welshmen resident in London. About 220 gentlemen sat down to dinner, which was pro- vided in excellent style by the Messrs. Bacon. The gal- leries of the dining-hall were filled with elegantly dressed ladies. The stewards wore cocked hats, ornamented with the Prince of Wales's plume of feathers, and the emblema- tic leek figured in the buttonhole of most of the guests pre- sent. From the appearance of scarlet fever among the children of the Welsh School they were not marshalled round the room, as has been the custom on fonmer anniver- saries but, notwithstanding this disadvantage, the festivities of the evening were kept up with the greatest spirit. The Hon. Edward Mostyn Lloyd Mostyn presided, and testified his interest in the society not only by discharging in an able manner the duties of the chair, but also by subscribing the handsome sum of 100 guineas. He was supported by the Hon. Colonel Rice Trevor, the Lord Mayor, Lord Dudley C. Stuart, Earl Powis, the Attorney-General, the Rev. Thomas Hill, Colonel Wood, M.P.; Mr. John Williams, M.P.; Mr. Richards Richards, M.P.; Mr. Pryse Pryse, M.P.; Mr. W. Williams, Mr. W. B. Hughes, M.P.; the Hon. R. H. Clive, and the Rev. Sir Erasmus Williams. In proposing" Pros- perity to the Welsh Charity Schools," the chairman stated that, owing to the diminution in its funds, the benefits of the charity had not been extended during the past year to so many children as formerly, and aboutEI,000 of their stock had been disposed of; but he trusted their affairs were now about to assume a more prosperous aspect, and that the schools would be opened to a larger number of boys and girls. Of the former it appears that there are at present 116 on the establishment, and of the latter 67, making a total of 1,977 boys, and 566 girls, maintained and educated by the charity since its foundation. Col. Wood, the treasurer, announced during the evening subscriptions to the amount of £ 1,161, being the largest Z, sum ever contributed at an anniversary festival during his tenure of office. He also stated that a be- quest of £8,000 had been made to the charity by Miss Phil- lips, one of f,1,000 by Miss Williams, and oneofjE200 by Miss Jones. From these announcements it will be seen that this has been a fortunate year in the history of the Welsh schools. The agreeable manner in which the evening was 0 spent was greatly enhanced by the excellent quality of the music which was provided. The Misses Williams, Miss Re- becca Isaac, Miss Sara Flower, Mr. Genge, aud other per- formers, exerted themselves to the utmost to please. The Welsh harp was played on charmingly by Mr. Roberts and, altogether, there was infused into the proceedings enough of the characteristics and tastes of Taffy to relieve them from the monotony of the great run of charity dinners. Mr. Harker was toastmaster.

WELSH LECTURES, IN LONDON.

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BRITISH EMPIRE MUTUAL LIFE…

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