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OUR CHRISTIAN ACHIEVEMENTS IN INDIA. British arms have againheen victorious in tho Punjab. In another column we give a full account of this questionable triumph. It will be seen that in obtaining it the sword of the Sikh has decimated our gallant army. Led on with precipitant and reckless daring by Lord Gough, against numbers vastly their superior, without plan or forethought, our soldiers dashed into the ranks of the enemy, and after several repulses, and terrific slaughter on both sides, suc- ceeded in dislodging them from their various positions. In this engagement there vtas none of rour modem et rate glow none of the manoeuvres and scientific arrangements that make warfare a gentlemanly and Christian pursuit. Brute force w:s deadlily and determinedly pitted against brute force. Passion directed the councils and suggested the movements. She waved her sword, and with an impetu- osity and a prowess too grossly misdirected, but never sur- passed, our troops rushed to destroy or be destroyed. The strength of the enemy was unknown. Their forces were concealed in a jungle. It was past the hour of noon, and yet our commander-in-chief, courageously, but with an un- pardonable temerity, gave battle to the foe. The wonder is, not that the loss of life was so fearful, but that, in an engagement with such disciplined and valiant troops as those of the Sikhs, under such heavy disadvantages, that greater n-ambers had not fallen, and that our entire army was not discomfited. Though a salute of 21 guns at our Presidency announced the result of this action as a victory, we doubt much whether, beyond the batiks of the Sutlcj to the foot of the llimaylayahs, the standards captured from our regiments, and the cannon taken from our artillery, are not paraded as trophies of a triumph over British arms. However this may be, the issue of this bloody contest is a bootless one. The war which has already cost so much blood and treasure, is not brought by it a whit nearer to its termination. We doubt much whether it will not tend to its prolongation. The Sikhs will take courage from the measure of success that has already attended them, and the Afighans, who are hovering in great force upon the iiio will very likely sweep down to their assistance, seeing that they are so near a match for our present Indian army. Affghun and Sikh, each bearing hatred to our rule, and nursing vengeance against the power that has so often humiliated them, will prove formidable adversaries in the battle-field. But, according to Parliamentary parlance, they must be conquered—our military supremacy through- out the whole continent of Intiia must be uphJd; and to do this, there must be more lighting—more desolation, blood, and death. To us the accounts wo continually receive from India are perfectly horrifying. When our missionaries preacli io the Hindoos, and other infidel tribes, the doctnnce.of Olmslxdrnty, and tell them of the subline anthem which angels sung when Christ came among men, how inconsistent must we appear in their eyes. We send to them teachers of peace, love, and brotherly kindness. We send too, men of war, of eel butchery and strife. The standards which Bishops consecrate, floats as signals for carnage in the field of battle. We distribute bibles amongst them and iirg, them to obey the commandments they contain, and yet, in our intercourse with these barbarians whom we would fain convert, we show an utter disregard of those very commandments, lo the Sikh and those of the Mahomedan faith, the use of ths sword is a religious-duty. Heaven is the reward of the galLmt in war, and to it they endeavour to carve their way, through serried ranks and over gore-stained fields. To these hoicios of the semi-civilized, war is the business of their life tL y live and die for it. To these the shrieks of the wouudc 1, and the o-roans of the dying, have the charms of music. The st ttely march, and the rushing charge, the rattle at" musketry, the clang of arms, and tlie boom of cannon, are sounds to them both5familiar and pleasing. But to the Christian, the sword, if not prohibited altogether, it is to some extent yvowribed. War harmonises not with the gospel. The profession of the soldier clashes with that of the Cnristian. The pomp and pageantry of war ill accords with the simple duties enjoined by the Author of our religion. The devastation ox whole countries, the demolition of cities, and the s icri.ice of the t" 1 lives of thousands, are surely consequences of diametri- cally opposed to those of Him who went_e.botu ng good. The Christians of Great Britain owe it to UM-msaxes nnu their Great Master that they BLUUIU nt O}Jl'(: lot3Lr them selvest and protest against the course our Government is prosecuting in India and our other settlements. Our armies prevent the extension of religion in the world more than anything else. All the efforts that Christians make to evangelize the world are counteracted by the bad example set by our soldiers and marines, both in battle and in barracks. In the instance to which we are now referring, the Sikh has learned the art of war from us, we have taught him to be dangerous to 11, In our past history we have done many wrongs in India, and we are now reaping the reward of our iniquities. We are hated by many and loved by few. We have ruled by fear. Let our Indian army retire to its own territory, and if it must fight, content it: elf with beating its foes when attacked by them at home. We know such advice as this will be scouted as unpolitic and unwarlike. It may be so but it is nevertheless the most Christian. This however will not be. Our Government has already shewn their determination to make up for the disas- ters brought upon us by Lord Gough. The brave but incom- petent general has been superseded, and that lion in war the conqueror of Scinde will soon be on his way to the scene of action. His name itself is terrible in India, and will do as much as anything else for its pacification. Had Sir Charles Napier been sent before, there is no doubt much bloodshed would have been prevented.

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