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NORTH WALES RAILWAY.

[No title]

HOUSE OF COMMONS.—THURSDAY,…

JSUB-DIVISION OF POPULOUS…

,IRISH POOR LAW. '

HOUSE OF COMMONS.—FRIDAY,…

,POOR-LAWS (IRELAND.)

HOUSE OF LORDS.—MONDAY, MARCH…

HOUSE OF COMMONS.—MONDAY,…

THE BURDENS ON LAND.

COMMITTEE ON POOR LAWS, IRELAND.

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COMMITTEE ON POOR LAWS, IRELAND. The adjourned debate was resumed by Mr. OSBORNE, who said that the question had been very fairly put by Lord John Russell, and it amounted to this—that the Poor Law had broken down in the western districts of Ireland, and this was a measure to levy a contribution upon the south and north to relieve the poverty of the west. The fact was that the Ministers were not able to deal with the tremendous difficulties with which the subject was surrounded and instead of bringing forward, as they might have done, effectual measures in time, they resorted now to an empirical remedy, which could adminis- ter no permanent relief- Sir R. PEEL said he would address himself at once to the two main questicms-first, in the present state of Ireland, was it ex- pedient to cast the support of the poor exclusively upon the re- sources of the unions secondly, if some ex'rinsic aid was neces- sary, from what source should it come? He was not for fixing the sustentation of the destitute in Ireland upon each individual union. Great injustice had been done to the landlords of Ireland, who had made, in many parts, strenuous exertions, and if the whole of the rates had not been paid, it \\('\s often through physical impossibility. If extrinsic aid was refused, it might expose some of the destitute class in Ireland to die of famine, and he conld net believe that a British House of Commons would consent to such an alternative. He wished the House to direct its attention to the future condition and prospects of Ireland and with that view Sir Robert read some details from public documents, showing the vast and ungovernable amount of destitution in various parts of Ireland; and, referring to the original plantation of Ulster in the reign of James I., be thought the only remedy-one slow in its operation-upon which any reliance coul,l be placed, was the in- troduction of new proprietors, who should take the property free Of its preseut encumbrances, and the consequent introduction of new-capital. In temporary expedients, in puld c grants and elee- mosynary rates, there was no hope of rescuing Ireland from i:s present calamity; at the expiration of two years, its condition would be no better than it is. If, by the appointment of a com- mission. acting in conjunction with the Government, which shou'd consider the whole subject, a change could be effected in the con- dition of landed property in Ireland, by the sale and redistribution of it upon just and equitable terms, he did hope that a foundation might he laid for the future prosperity of lhat country. Mr. W. BROWN supported the proposition of the Governmrn\ and excited the amazement of the Irish members by offering to prove that, so far from Ireland being a en-ditor of England for E60,000,000, she was a debtor to the amount of £ 200,000,000. Several Irish members having spoken, Sir GEORGE GHKY said it had almost universally admitted that there did exist in the western uniuns of Ireland an amount of dis- tress which it was quite impossible to relieve from the local re. sources, and that some extraneous aid was required to prevent starvation. One great cause of the distressin Ireland was the sys- tem of letting out lands in small pa'ches for growing potatoes, which, while it yielded a large income to the proprietor, produced a pauper peasantry. An admission almost as general had been made, that a stop should be put to the repeated applications to the Imperial Pailiament. He stated the vast influx of Irish pau- perism into this country at the rate of 1,0.0 paupers per week, which fact furnished an answer to the objection that England bote no share of the burden. In looking for a remedy for the distress of Ireland, although he was not sanguine in thinking that Parlia- ment could apply an effectual one. he cordially concurred with Sir Robert Peel that much might be done by a transfer of property from owners encumbered wih burdens which disqualified them from disfhargbig their duties as landlords to men of capital able and willing to giv>. employment to the people. The subject, how- ever, required much consideration. Lord CASTLKRF.AGH having moved that the Chairman report progress, to which Lord J. RUSSELL objected, the Committee di- vided upon that motion which was negatived by 251 to 104, Tie morion for adjourning the debate being, however, renewed. Lord J. Russell yielded, and the Chairman reporting progress, obtained leave to sit again on Tuesday.

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