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THE INSURRECTION.— ALARMING…

SEIZURE FOR RENT—FATAL CONFLICT.

I INQUEST ON ONE OF THE INSURGENTS…

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AN ACT AUTHORISING KILLING…

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gtgrictilture.

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THE INDELIBILITY OF HOLY ORDERS.

FATAL ACCIDENT ON THE GREAT…

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FATAL ACCIDENT ON THE GREAT WESTERN RAILWAY.—THREE LIVES LOST. GLOUCESTER, SATTIIXOA? AFTEHNOOX.—A most melaii- eholy catastrophe happened yesterday afternoon on the Great Western railway, near the Hathcrley Bridge, between this city and Cheltenham. This portion of the iine is use in common by the Great Western broad gauge and the Mid- land narrow gauge companies, a line of four feet nine-uifc.; the afternoon, a o.* men ill the employ of Mr. Blink- horn, contractor, were engaged in removing old and laying down new ballast; and in consequence of ihe almost constant traffic of the two companies passing over this particular parr of the line, Ihe work is liable to frequent interruption, ami a vigilant look-out is necessary for the safety of those en- gaged in ballasting. Accordingly, the contractor has em- ployed a lad to attend to this important dm3-, and to ring a loud-sounding bell on the approach 01 a train. About four o'clock a train of about sixty tuggage-trucks on the narrow gauge line passed, by. The bell was sounded as usual, and five of the men thoughtlessly stood upon the down line, counting the trucks as" they passed. Whilst they were so engaged, the Great Western train, which left Paddington at twelve o'clock, appeared in sight. The boy rang the bell; and the driver of the engine, Firefly, sounded the steam whistle but the poor 'fellows sccJUëd not to hear it, or they made 'not the least attempt to move off the line. The driver of the engine, perceiving the terrible fate that awaited them, endeavoured to shut off the steam, and re- verse the action of the engine. All, however, had but little effect in thwarting the shocking accident that ensued. The Firefly reached the fix-e. i-ilifoi-ttiiiatc, men, and in an instant they were struck to the ground. On the passing of the train a melancholy catastrophe presented itself. The re- mains of three of the pour fellows were, stretched on the permanent way shockingly mutilated. Their names are Joel Witts, John Newman, and Henry Paul, whose deaths were instantaneous. The other two men, James Wilkes and Joseph Ford, were discovered to be alive. Mr. Ashbee, the superintendent of the Cheltenham station, and Dr. Brooks" of the same town, were quickly dispatched by a pilot-engine to the scene, and the survivors with every care were con veycd. to the Cheltenham Hospital. There it was ascertained that Wilkes has sustained a compound fracture of the arm and leg; Ford, a fracture of the thigh and arm. Eventually, however, Ford's thigh was amputated, so se- verely was it shattered. The remains of those who were killed were removed to Cheltenham. The five poor fellows were married. Witts and Newman have left as many as eight children each. The survivors remain in a bad way. Wilkes says that they were so engaged in noticing the lug- gage trucks that they altogether forgot the approach of the Great Western train.

HIDDEN THINGS BROUGHT TO LIGHT.

IRELAND. ---■—