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THE SORROWS OF STIYLOCIy. According to Shakspere, Shylock was a rich Jew, who lent Bassanio three thousand ducats on the credit of Anto- jsio, the merchant of Venice. This kindness he did show," on the express condition that if Antonio's bond should not -be honoured the Jew was to have An equal pound Of your fair flesh to be cut off and taken In what part of your body pteascth me." Tho bond, unfortunately, was forfeited, and nothing would satisfy Shylock but a pound of flesh." He was entreated L he merciful—three or even six times the amount of the bisnd was offered him—but all to no purpose his incessant cry was— I' I have my !)()nd I will not hear thee speak. have my bond and therefore speak no more.. I it not be in ale a soft and dull-eyed fool, To nhake the head, relent, and sigh and yield To Christian intercessors. Follow not; have no speaking I will have my bond." li-o have been stro.iglv reminded during the past week of-thc- grief's inexpressible which the relentless Jew felt at his being disappointed of his pound of flesh, by the conduct of certain parties in this town. Our readers are aware that at our late Assizes two Irishmen were sentenced to death for the wilful murder of John Williams, near Swansea. One of them was leftfor execution, on whose behalf the hunia-io people of Cardiff and Swansea exerted themselves to obtain commutation of sentence. In this praiseworthy object they succeeded, and Martin has been respited during her Majesty's pleasure, and-we are glad to Had that the sen- tence has been commuted to transportation for life, much to the disappointment of a certain class of men, who have a most Voracious appetite for blood, and an unaccountable longing to witness a case of public strangling. Several persons had come from a great distance in order as they expected to witness the disgusting- sight of an execution, on Saturday week. Loud and bitter in some instances were the curses heaped upon the heads of the individuals who were sup- posed to have been instrumental in saving the man's life. We did not wonder that men and women, who had travelled 10, 15, 29, and 30 miles to Keast their eyes on the death ago nies of a fellow creature were very wroth. We were pre- pared for the curses of the pickpocket and the maledictions of the common prostitute, but certainly we did- not expect a successor to Shylock in our contemporary the Guardian. But alas! for human expectations, the ShyloeL character is admirably maintained in the following extract Much might be said on the subject of their trial and Martin's subsequent reprieve after conviction by a most intelligent and im- partial jury—a conviction with which the judge fully concurred but under the present circumstances, no public benefit would arise from a discussion of the question. We would merely ob- serve—that surely the judge and jury were as able to give an opi- nion on the case; as persons who, confessedly, do not know the difiereuce between evidence'and conversation. We are told that much might be said" on the subject of reprieving a convict. It was no doubt a strange mishap that such I a quality as humanity should interfere with the wishes of the Guardian, backed as he was. by the conviction of a most intelligent and impartial jury," and the concur- rence of the learned judge, just as if these thirteen persons must under any and every circumstance prove infallible. But our contemporary wisely abstains from discussing the question, as no public benefit would arise from it. Pity then that he could not have kept his sorrows to himself, and bury his mere observation" in the deepest recesses of his wounded bosom. That lie could have done, if he were so anxious for the public good; but the occasion afforded a fine opportunity to aim a blow, at the editor of another paper. The blow nevertheless must be covert and left-handed. He foresaw the danger of open and advised speaking ;—■ YlIu'll ask me why I rather choose to have A weight of carrion flesh than to receive Three thousand ducats: I'll not answer that, But say it is my humour He must insinuate that Martin has been reprieved by the exertions of persons who confessedly do not know the difference between evidence' and conversation. We believe we know the Guardian's meaning, but in this in- stance his sneer is very meaningless. Probably he is aware that the Cardiff memorial to the Secretary of State was signed by attorneys, town councillors, magistrates, mer- chants, ministers of religion, and by, at least, one of the jury who tried Martin. And yet these men do not know the difference between evidence and conversation." In the effort to have the sentence commuted, no name stands so conspicuous and honoured as that of Thomas Wm. Booker, Esq., the deservedly popular High Sheriff. With the politics f of that honourable gentleman, we have- .not the good for- [ tune to coincide, but strangers as we are to the town of Cardiff, we know enough of its inhabitants to feel assured that they will indignantly repudiate the insinuation that the High Sheriff does not know the difference between evidence and conversation." The High Sheriff does know the difference, and knowing that the evidence upon which Martin was condemned was not satisfactory, he has had the good sense and humanity to exert himself to the ut- most to prevent a further sacrifice of human life.. Amid the many acts of benevolence and mercy which adorn his ca- reer, and shed their fragrance over his character, not one of the least pleasing will be the saving of Martin's, life, who, as he believes in his heart, is entirely innocent. He must bear the sneers of Shylock, and that we dare say he can do with a light heart. We thank heaven that Shylock has been disappointed. True, the disappointment was great—the wood-cut was ready—(as much like the editor as it is like the miserable culprit)—the machinery for a "full and accurate" report of the finishing of the law was in preparation—an enormous sale was expected for the last dying confession "—the cant phrases that serve to adorn the solemn mockery of justice were in attendance—and Shylock stood oil his bond," when the message of mercy arrived. The pound of flesh-of Irish flesh-could not be had, though awarded by a most right- ful jndge." Shyloek's heart was troubled, and in the ex- tract already quoted he has given vent to his sorrows. We have expressed no opinion on the lawfulness of capital punishments, because we did not deem it necessary under the circumstances. As several known and confessed mur- derers have been reprieved of late, we believed it right to invoke the exercise of mercy on the behalf of a man, who, to say the least, had been condemned on very doubtful and unsatisfactory evidence. Capital punishments we believe are doomed; and we would earnestly invite the attention of our readers to the letters of our esteemed friend Mr. Price, which are appearing weekly in our columns. They will make many a heart rejoice, though they will add to the sorrows of Shylock..

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