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THE REV. D. CHARLES, B.A.,…

THE REYEREND~IRGRIFFITIIS…

THE ASPECT OF THE TIMES.

.MOSEY MARKET.

FROM THE LONDON GAZETTE.

LONDON CORN EXCHANGE.

QUOTATIONS.

SMITIIFIELD.

LIVERPOOL CORN EXCHANGE.

-..,,-...r'V...rvv'" PROVISION…

LONDON SEED MARKET.

WOOL MARKET.

..............J.v.""'V-V-V"'o/V'",vv,vv"-'v...r...-V"'''-V-''J'-'''''V…

-----------TALLOW.

I sand nine hundred ditto,…

HIDES. ~ ~~~~~ I

HAY. ' !

..._-=---::.:;..;a COLONIAL…

-WELSH MARKETS.

Family Notices

MURDERING BY LAW.

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abolition waste all their sympathy on the guilty wretched culprit; but this is an unjust charge, and liKe alLother n-j founded fabrics will, in due time, fall to the ground. Tar, far be the thought from any one, that the man woo could lay raurderotvs hands on a fellow-being should again walk af large in' the enjoyment of liberty. But is it not an uiideni- able fact, that many a hardened transgressor (because of the present state of the law) escapes wholly from any PunisJl" ment. -as the jury have no alternative left them but to sacri- tee life? 1 W here it is possible for an able counsellor to conjure lip a doubt, by any means, just or. unjust, even when the prisoner at the bar stands charged with staining his hands with human blood, any twelve men of kind feelings and religious senti- ments will give that man the benefit of the slightest doubt that may come athwart their minds, rather than be the means ,Of con sigi-,iiig one with all his sins on his head to a premature jj-rave. There is a strong natural disinclination, in all good to convict in capital cases; whereas, if the punishment awarded to offenders tell short of death, no one would hesi- "tate under full conviction to bring in a verdict of guilty. But Mr. Editor, as I intend, with your leave, writing a few letters in the PRINCIPALITY, on this subject, to call the notice of the vo'jno" to the evil3 of those laws that take away life, I shall "close" this letter by congratulating the public at large, and especially the Christian people of Cardiff, on their happy escape from the painful ordeal of looking at ticusand^ wend- ing their way through the streets, and rushing on with the greatest amdetv to witness that disgusting scene—that most IdiV.ful spectacle—a low functionary of the law, a. hangman lea In? a fellow-creature to the scaffold; and taere, with mur- derous hands, one unfeeling wretch puts another to a violent •<Wth' I will not insult the feelings of men of common sense by supposing that any of them would have been pre- sent- but I would ask, what is it that leads such vast multi. tildes to these murderous scenes ? Is it to gratify their eyes by gazing on the agoniea of one in the last throes of strlg- convulsed nature ? No one attends for the sake of im- bibing a moral lesson. No one looks upon that horrid mou- .,iiter-tlie hangman—with a view to be alarmed out of ms (•lrtchea' Wh*t is it then that leads the throng to the place of execution ? What is that morbid desire to witness the most horrid of tragedies? What are those amazing propen- sities to gr-tify the most base, the most vitiated, and unna- tural appetites? They are not prompted by feelings of pity towards the culprit; nor by any regard to the law that sacri- fices his life. n-hold th» multitudes meet to witness the most degrading performance-a legal murder. The thief is there, and reaps his harvest under the scaffold; the abandoned female is there the debauchee is there; and all decency is outraged while'the law-officers go through a brutal mimicry of solemn things. Is not the whole scene a moral stain upon a country that stands in the midst of all the kingdoms of the world un- rivalled for its charitable, humane, aad glorious institutions. Mr Editor, I rejoice greatly in the success which has attended the efforts of the people of Cardiff to save the life of two immortal beings. Who can tell that the mercy of Heaven may not yet be extended to them. LYMRO JDACH.