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HOUSE OF LORDS, THURSDAY,…

HOUSE OF COMMONS, THURSDAY,…

SALARIES OF MINISTERS.

I NCUMBERED ESTATES (IRELAND)…

CORRUPT PRACTICES AT ELECTIONS…

CHURCH SITES (SCOTLAND) BILL,

.METROPOLITAN SEWERS.

HOUSE OF LORDS, FRIDAY, JULY…

HOUSE OF COMMONS, FRIDAY,…

THE SUGAR BILL.

HOUSE OF COMMONS, SATURDAY,…

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HOUSE OF COMMONS, SATURDAY, 22, The House met at twelve o'clock, when Lord So'hn Russell,, in a long speech, which was received with marked approbation'j by both sides of the House, moved for leave to bring in a bill to empower the Lord Lieutenant, or other chief governor or governors of Irel; nd, to apprehend and detain, until the 1st of March, 1S49, such persons as he or they shall suspect of eon- spiring against her Majesty's person or Government. Mr. F. O'Connor seized the first opportunity of declaring his intention to give to the bill every opposition in his power, but sat down without making any motion. Sir Robert Peel immediately succeeded, and, in a short speech, gave his most cordial and decided support to the measure pro- posed by her M ajesty's Government, and overwhelmed the ''wicked conspirators" with his most scornful ridicule. The question now at issue really was, not whether there should be a repea) of the Union, but whether there should be a total separation of the two countries. He believed that, if the House refused to act now, there would be a desolating warfare during the recess in Ireland. He believed that the Crown would ultimately be suc- cessful in it; but, if it were not, of this he was sure, that there would be substituted for the present Government the most cruel, the most base, and the most sanguinary despotism that had ever disgraced any country. He considered the measure of Govern- ment to be fully jus ified by the avowed declarations of open and undisguised traitors, who had not scrupled to recommend the, as- sassination of the Lo;d Lieutenant. If further measures were re- quired for the suppression of crime in Ireland, lie hoped that rd- ditional"powers would be demanded from the House, ard that there would be no delay in stating their extent. He likewise hoped that the House would consent to the suspension of any of its forms which would prevent the passing of this bill at once. Mr. Osborne gave a qualified support to the bill. With the in- formation he had, he could not oppose its introduction, but nei- ther could he vote for its continuance till March, 1849, because he. thought the House should sit from month to month in deliberation on the remedial measures necessary for Ireland. Mr. Pad lief also qualified his support by attributing the disor- der of Ireland to the great misconduct of its rulers. Mr. S. Crawford, considering the force at the disposal of the Government sufficient to put down any insurrection, and that coercive measures without remedial measures would be ineffectual, moved an amendment to that effect which was seconded by Mr. Fagan. The original motion was supported by Mr. D'lsraeli, Sir D. Norreys, Mr. H. Drutnuioiid, Mr. Hume, Mr. Newdegate, Mr. Grogan, Mr. Muntz (who asked Mr. Crawford to withdraw his amendment), Sir H. Barron, and Colonel Dunne (who, however, concurred in the amendment), and was opposed by Mr. Cal- laghan, Mr. Reynolds, and Mr. Scully. The House divided, when there were- For the amendment 8 Againstit 271—263 The bill was then brought in, and, tne standing orders uel,ir suspended, went through all its stages and was passed, Mr. Os- borne having, in committee, made an unsuccessful attempt to li- mit its operation to the 1st of September, 1848. The House adjourned shortly before seven o'clock. "=,C, ;;<t, .'r"

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