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FUAXCE.

1SPAIN.

FJlANIvF() RT.—TIIE GERMAN…

-----_--IRELAND.

A LETTER TO MR. BATTY, THE…

TO THE EDITOR OF THE PRINCIPALITY.

[No title]

STANZAS.

. CHILDREN IN WORKHOUSES:

[No title]

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Tim LADY GODIYA PUOCESSION AT COVENTRY.—This ancient procession was renewed this year at Coventry, and was cele- brated in the presence of a vast number of spectators. Some of the papers'give the following account of the proceedings:- In various parts of the town had been erected triumphal arches of great height, otnaaj^ented with flowers and evergreens and of which verdant materials wreaths were suspended across the public thoroughfarcsip-, many other places. Many private houses were also similarly decorated in front. The cavalcade started at eleven o'clock, headed by Mr. Wombwell's elephant bearing a castle, and thus forming a living and literal represen- tation of the City Arms of Coventry. The sagacity and docility with which the creature threaded" its way in the midst of a dense throng through the streets for four hours was truly remark- able. Madame War toil's performance of Godiva was regarded as highly satisfactory. She was attired in a close-nfting elastic- silk dress, of pinky-white colour, entire from the neck to the toes, excepting the arms, which were uncovered; over this a simple white satin tunic, edged with gold fringe, completed her riding habit. Her only head-dress was the perfectly unartifieial and not very profuse supply of glossy black hair, simply braided in. front, and hanging dawn, slightly confined behind. Mounted on a milk-white steed, a clever equestrian, and maintaining a. pure demeanour, she was repeatedly cheered in the course of the route. Mr. Wartogs,. her husband, rode a short distance il3., the rear, as Edward the Black, Prince, clad in a suit of mail." Now, we put it to our readers if such an occurrence as that of a woman riding almost in a state of nudity, through one of the meanest villages in Wales, would not have raised a cry of universal indignation throughout the land ? But here in » large English town the authorities permit a scene which must outrage the decency that ought to prevail in a civilised commu- nity, and the cries against it from the English press are few and far between, We have no wish to raise an untl-Ellghsh cry on account of this procession, but we have a right to expect that the papers which so dolefully deplored the ignorance Of Wales a few weeks ago, would have denounced such an outrage on civilisation and morality/in lid-measured terms.' We are happy to find that the Standard of Freedom has not permitted; j this outrage to pass uli.rebuk.ed,.