Hide Articles List

15 articles on this Page

HOUSE OF LORDS, THURSDAY,…

HOUSE OF COMMONS, THURSDAY,…

HOUSE OF LORDS, FRIDAY, JUKE…

HOUSE OF COMMONS, FRIDAY',…

HOUSE OF COMMONS, MONDAY,…

HOUSE OF LORDS, TUESDAY, JULY…

HOUSE OF COMMONS, TUESDAY,…

Advertising

TO AUTHORS.

TO SUBSCRIBERS.

TO CORRESPONDENTS.

[No title]

PARLIAMENT.

FOREIGN BROILS.

News
Cite
Share

FOREIGN BROILS. CONTINENTAL affairs seem to continue unsettled. France is struggling with the waves. Arrests continue to be made, so that the prisons arc fall. Such is the number of the imprisoned that it is probable we shall soon hear of Prison Insurrections. Indeed they have already been acted on a small scale. Labour is not resorted to, and the deprivation of the prisoners of their wine and tobacco, and the system of compulsory silence maintained, are great grievances." At Louthe priso iers have attempted, to break out of the prison, and at Melun they barricaded themselves in the sleeping- rooms. Nothing positive is known, as yet, in regard to the origin of the late bloody conflict. The charge of the insure rection being instigated and sustained by foreign gold is indignantly denied in. this country. Thus much, however, is certain, that the rebels had abundance of money, and conse- quently, they must have had it from some source beside themselves. Some lay the blame on Henry V., others on Russia, and others on Louis Philippe. We are told, how- over, by a most unexceptionable authority, that the Ex-King is realty poor, and could not afford to furnish means for a costly insurrection. It is now currently reported that M. Emile Girardin is implicated as the agent of Russia, and that an extensive correspondence has been found, which will most undoubtedly bring the charge home to him. These things, however, arc mere rumours, and perhaps the papers of to-morrow will tell a different talc, and give positive contradictions to the foregoing reports. We think, how- ever, that there can be but little doubt of the legitimists being concerned in it. Such an enormous plot so well con- trived, and so desperately maintained, does not really seem to be the work of the disaffected and impoverished workmen, or of the thieves. The workmen, no doubt, assisted, and the thieves failed not to turn the opportunity to their own profit, but we cannot persuade ourselves that either party could succeed so far as the rioters seem to have done. General Cavaignac, notwithstanding the dissatisfaction created by the formation of his ministry, seams to be main- taining his popularity. His statemcnt of the dissolution of the national workshops, given on Monday, in the National Assembly, was well received. He conceived that not more than one-half at the utmost, probably considerably less, of the workmen had united in the insurrection. lie had given. orders for the different mayors to give what they deemed suitable assistance for the present to those who would be thus thrown out of employment. The financial project of M. Goudchaux was likewise well received. His policy differs from that of his predecessors in his determination to pay off immediately the holders of Bonds of the Treasury in the sum of forty-eight francs at three per cent. consolidated, and the depositors of the sums placed in the Saving's Bank i.n five per cent. at seventy francs. Goudchaux stated it to be his intention to negotiate the loan for 150,000,000 francs from the Bank of France proposed by his predecessor. The new cabinet have determined to abandon the project of the former ministry in regard to railways, and thus make one advantageous remove from Communism. The financial state- ment caused an immediate rise in the price of funds. Tho discussion on the project of the constitution is carried on with vigour in several of the Committees. It is thought that important alterations will be made. The transitory and fleeting character of popular applause may be learned from the fate of Lamartine. That great man was at one time the idol of the people. Now he is closely watched, and it is hinted lie participated in the preliminary .transactions to the late deadly conflict. We cannot bring ourselves to believe this: either Lamartine is deeply wronged, or he is beyond doubt the arch-hypocrite of Christendom. We believe his star will be again in the ascendant, and that the poet-States- man will yet rise to that eminence, which his talents, and we hope his principles, deservedly adapt him for. Like the splendid creations of his own sublime genius, we fondly trust, for the honour of our common nature, that he will be found the pure and true. Spain is brooding over internal convulsions. Narvaez rules with a rod of iron. He has just given orders for u. forced loan, and the deduction of a month's salary from all who are engaged in public offices. The journals are busily liscussing the probabilities of the Queen being in a condition likely to give an heir to the throne. Poor Isabella! who would envy her queenly rank ? Domestic ties, political con- vulsions, and fading splendour seem to vie in mocking her helpless woe! Tiie affairs of Italy arc still held in the balance. The sword continues unsheathed, and the decisive lour seems as distant as ever. Prussia and Denmark remain uiipacified, but no hostilities have taken place of late. There is a rumour that Russia has declared war against tho Jerman. Confederation, but it is not confirmed. 0

THE GOD-SEND OF FINALITY.