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HOUSE OF LORDS, THURSDAY,…

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HOUSE OF LORDS, FRIDAY, JUKE…

HOUSE OF COMMONS, FRIDAY',…

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HOUSE OF COMMONS, FRIDAY', June 30. The Speaker took the chair at four o'clock. SUGAR DUTIES. The House then went into committee on the Sugar Duties. On the first resolution being put from the chair, Mr. Bright rose to move the amendment of which he had given notice. The question was whether there should be a large or a small increase made in the amount of the protection now given to West India sugars. The debate that had just closed had entirely destroyed the propositions brought forward bv the noble lord, but there was one thing in particular which could not have failed to strike any person who had heard the dis- cussion—namely, that one great party to the question had been totally overlooked, and that was the great class of sugar con- sumers in the three kingdoms for whose benefit the Act of 1S4G had been passed. Now, he stood there on behalf of that great class by whom sugar was consumed; and he asked the committee to refuse to alter the Act of 1843. The noble lord was without blame to himself at the head of a Government which was then in an unfortunate position in regard to finance, and it was his duty to consider howhe would make up the present deficiency before he increased it. That he had done that which would sacrifice revenue, be injurious to the sugar consumer of this country—that which the West Indians themselves re- pudiated, and which the committee of the House did not re- comrr end—that which would unsettle a great settlement, was, he thought, matter of blame to the noble lord and his Govern- ment. Standing by the bill of 1816, they might have defied any combination of mistaken philanthropy on the one side, and of monopoly on the other. As it was, they had given to their opponents an advantage they would not recover and as he thought the measure alike .pernicious to this country and the West Indies, he would move as an amendment, That it was not desirable to make any alteration in the sugar duties of 1840" (hear, hear). Mr. G. Berkeley said that he trusted the House would reject the measure of the hon. member for Manchester, and that the next packet which went to these unfortunate colonies would be the bearer of better news than the last. He was certain that they needed the most ample -protection. Mr. Bagshawe also opposed the amendment. Mr. Tolleinache having made some explanations of the evi- derce he gave before the committee, said that he conceived that ex, essive pr( tection would be not only unjust to the people of th's country bv making prices high, but injurious to every class connected with the West Indies. The Chancellor of the Exchequer said that he concurred in a great part of the speech and in most of the principles uttered by the hon. member for Manchester but circumstances some- times rendered necessary the iiiod-iticatioll of a principle which he thought might be done without any sacrifice or dereliction of it. In this a ;( they were pa. sing from protection to free t; ade, and they proposed a temporary compromise between them, softening the evils which would arise from an abrupt change. The lion, gentleman said, and truly, that he (the Chancellor of the Exchequer) declared last Friday that the h.ll of 1846 ought not to be departed from. But he should be utterly deaf to all information if he maintained that opinion mcr Iv for consistency sake, and in the face of the evidence of the committee and the change of circumstances that had since taken place. Under those circumstances he consi- dered that the Government was bound to make an attempt to check the destruction of property which was threatened from utter want of credit. The Government had abandoned the in- tention of proposing an additional vote for the militia, whereby an outlay of £ 15o,000 would be avoided. lie had gone through the navy and ordnance estimates with the First Lord of the Admiralty, and they had satisfied themselves that without in, any degree impairing the efficiency of these services, a reduc- tion on the year of £ 300,000 istight easily be effected (cries of "hoor. hear"). His hon. friend the Secretary to the Admiralty had stated that a much larger reduction might be expected in the ensuing year; but with the existing contracts it was im- possible to carry the reduction in the present year beyond what he had stated. The result of this was to reduce the whole ex- penditure by £ 685,000. Mr. Hastie felt thoroughly convinced in his own mind that the proposition of her Majesty's Government would do much to relieve the planter and to increase our exports by raising still more the condition of the negro. He should, therefore, give it his support. Mr. Oardwell said that the right honourable gentleman had. given them a second budget (laughter) yes, but he had admitted frankly that his second budget was not satis- factory, and he had very considerately promised them a third. He thought they had great cause to congratulate themselves on the reluctance to replace the alleged two millions by in- creased taxation at a time when it would have been peculiarly heavy to bear, for without any exertion on their part no less than £ 1,500,000 of the amount had disappeared (cheers). He did not know that they had very much otherwise to congratulate themselves upon in the budget now before them. The miscel- laneous estimates appeared to be as high as they were in pre- vious years, though they were much below what was origin- ally proposed this year. He could have no hesitation in record- ing his vote against the motion of the hon. member for Man- chester. Mr. Wilson thought that the evidence taken before the com- mittee showed that there were exceptionable considerations from applying to these colonies the general principle which he entertained with regard to commercial policy, and he thought it unwise to apply strictly to the West Indies 'the provisions- of the Act of 18*16. Lord Nugent said that the statements of the noble lord (J. Russell), and 'he argume: ts urged in support pf his propositions. had only confirmed km in his views of the Act of 1846; and he was therefore resolved t) vote against the amendment of the hon. member for Manchester. He should also give his cordial vote, ii, all its stages, a ainst what he considered to be a feeble, a faithless, and, in its tendency, a wicked measure. England had a sacred duty to perform — which wiis to renounce all"commerce and com- munion with the menw, cue pursuits were those of piracy and murder, and who.-e merchandise was produced by the most ciuel and barbarous p oceedings. The galieiy w, s cleared, when a division was taken on the main question.. The numbers were- For ihe r> s uutiou 302 Agaii st it 3G—260 After a short discussion, The Chairman rorted progress. Report to be received on Monday next, it beng understood that the further discussion of the question should be concluded on that evening, MISCELLANEOUS. A writ for the bore ugh of Shgo was ordered. Another was a'so ordered for Great Yarmouth. Mr. LTquhart put several questions to Lord Palmerston in re- gard to the state of Spain, and the producing of a correspondence ordered by the House a few weeks HgO. Mr. Wj Id asked Lord Palmerston if a British vessel laden with arms had bten seized by the French authorities on the coast of Brnahi. The noble lord said lie was not aware of it. and expressed his decided approbation of the mode in which the Provisional Govern- ment and the Executive Committee had conducted themselves towards this kingdom. PARLIAMENTARY ELECTORS BILL. Sir De L. Evans having moved the reports on this bill, After some (,ojiver,.ill, ioti the report- was postponed till Monday next, and the House adjourned at a quarter past one.

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