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HOUSE OF LORDS, THURSDAY,…

HOUSE OF COMMONS, THURSDAY,…

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HOUSE OF COMMONS, THURSDAY, JUNE 29, Tt. Hume (at the request of Lord J. Russell) adjourned the debate upon his motion until Thursday next. Lord G. Bcutinck and Nlr. Labouehere mutually explained a.j in statements they had made on the subject of the despatches and. the Colouial-ofiiea. "YEST IFLTBATE. Sir It. Ingli., after characterising the Government proposi- tion as bused on a neglect of the interests of the West Indian colonists, proceeded to dilate on the horrors of the slave trade, wilier, this measure would tend to increase, and during the recital was at one time so overcome by his feelings that he was uliable to proceed for some moments. But the great question which the House had now to decide was, whether or not negro was to go down to posterity as an abortive ri n I ii lr. Barkly observed that the question before them lay between a 5s." duty for a certain period, and a l()s. duty for a shorter time. In his opinion the adoption of the higher pro- tection for a few years would cost the country less than would trie measure of the Government, whilst, by giving them effi- cient protection for a short time, they might enable many of the pLuters who had been ruined by vacillating legislation, to retrieve to some extent their position. Mr. Labouehere defended the Government measure. Mr. Goulburn opposed it, as a scheme which would not be found applicable to the exigency of the case. There was some- thing almost ludicrous in the proposal of a loan, upon the security of the revenue of the colonies, seeing that those revenues were in a state of progressive annihilation. With n respect to the small additional protection proposed to be given to the colonies, it would not, unless accompanied by other measures of relief, be sufficient as a remedy for existing evils. On the whole, it was a scheme which fell far short of that which he had been led to expect. Sir R. Peel. after taking a review of the past and present state of the West Indies and the legislative enactments on the subject, said the great question for the House to consider was, whether it would consent to give a protecting duty of 10s. for a period of six years ? He could not vote for the amendment without thinking that he encouraged the West India body to hcjie that he was ready to give them the protection recom- mended by the committee. He was not prepared to vote for ssioh. a protection, not only on account of the interests of those concerned, but also from a sincere and conscientious belief that I i, would not conduce to the interests of the West Indians themselves. Tkey were distressed from want of labour, and that which was now asked was to give them a protection, which would equally extend to the Last Indies and the Mauri- tius, where there was no such want. Yet the competition of tHe iiusi Indies and the Mauritius would be as dangerous to the V" ",st Indies as foreign competition, stimulated as their production would be by such a protection (hear, he„) What that House should have in view was not to yut a certain sum into the poeicets of the W est India pro- prietors but to lay the foundation of future prosperity. This the proposal of a protecting duty of 10o. would not effect. The w:"y in which to benefit the planter was to reduce the cost of cultivation, and enable him permanently to enter into compe- tition. with the foreign producer. It was, then, because the amendment would not effect this, that lie could not give it his support. lIe would, then, say nothing about the plan of the Government, which was a matter for subsequent consideration. But he would impress upon the House this tact, that even if they were to give the planter the monopoly of the English market, they would not advance one step in the direction of permanent prosperity, as was fully attested by the history of the sugar-grown colonies (cheers). After a pause, Mr. Urqulurt rose to address the House, and having been received with marks of impatience, moved the adjournment of the debate. Mr. Aiistcy sccended the motion (cries of withdraw," and "goon)." Lord John Russell hoped that the hon. gentleman would not press his motion. Mr. Ur juhart begged to withdraw the motion, and proceeded to address the House. He was so frequently interrupted by cries of Divide" and Oh, oh that he was almost inaudible. i The Marquis of Granby, amidst loud cries of -II)ivide," Sari a few words in favour of protection. Lord ,T. Russell observed that that which the House had to dctide was whether, considering the peculiar state of the West Indies, it would think fit to grant a committee to consider whether or not it would effect any alteration in the duties of the act of 1846 ? After hearing the protracted debate, he was felly confirmed in the opinion which he had already expressed, th:it Sir J. Pakinston, instead of aiding by his amendment the solution of the question, had only placed embarrassment and deiav in its way. The amendment only went to condemn the proposition of the Government. Supposing him to carry it, what would be the effect of his success? He would get rid of one proposition amongst many which had been broached—he would destroy the proposal of the Government; but he would u »! advance one step towards any settlement from which the West In iians could derive relief. Mr. Muntz was opposed to the Government proposition. Mr. Avistey, amidst loud shouts 01 oil and all man- iv*r of noises, addressed the House. He accused the Govern- ment oluuking disgraceful overtures to the Irish members, and road eopiousiv from a pampk-cet published many years ago by Mr. Cobden, to show that free trade, as expounded by that 1!)¡, gentleman, meant neither more nor less than a dismem- berment of the empire. Being met with continued interrup- tioiiff, lie moved the adjournment of the House, (;,)1. Dunne denied cue assertion respecting the Irish mem- U The motion for adjournment was then withdrawn, and the lIuLi.61o! vilV on the Ill-Úa UllCbtlOil. For die motion 2-io Against it. 2t>«) M noritv in favour of ministers. lo The IIou.se thru went into committee. The resolution was then read from the table, whereupon Lord John Russell moved that the chairman report progress* and ask leave to sit agtin, The chairman thereupon reported progress, and, the other business being disposed of, the House adjourned at two.

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