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HOUSE OF LORDS, THURSDAY,…

COPYHOLD BILL.

EVICfED POOR (IRELAND) BILL.

HOUSE OF COMMONS, THURSDAY,…

"REFORM.—ADJOUllNRD DEBATE.

.WRIT FOR IIORSHAM.

HOUSE OF COMMONS, FRIDAY,…

DERBY "SWEEPS."—IMPORTANT…

ROMAN CATHOLIC RELIEF BILL.

TO AUTHORS.

TO SUBSCRIBERS. ~~~~

HOME AND ABROAD.

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HOME AND ABROAD. DURING last week we have not done much at home. Our legislators have been engaged for three mortal nights in dis- cussing a charge of suppressing a West Indian dispatch, brought against Mr. Hawes, the Under Colonial Secretary, by the stable-minded statesman, Lord George Bentinck. Through some mistake or other, the dispatch was not laid before the committee which inquired into the causes of West Indian distress. Lord George thought it important, and accused the Colonial officers of a design in withholding it. This incident led to a lengthened debate on three successive nights, and which ended as might be expected in all parties losing their temper. The ministerial plan for relief to the West Indies is more likely to succeed than it was last week. To be sure it is a. wretchedly absurd scheme, but absurd as it is who is pre- pared to propose a more feasible plan ? And, moreover, the state of public opinion is such in England just now that the aristocracy cannot afford to drive tlil- Wlligs to the Opposi- tion benches. In office they are fully devoted to the inte- rests of the aristocracy—in opposition they make a show of grumbling against them, and of defending popular liberty. But as matters now stand the Tories are spared the trouble of fighting their own battles, and escape the odium that otherwise would be cast upon them. Thus the affair rests at present, and the chances of the Whig measure are con- siderably increased. Our legislators have not been overworked during the past week. The debate on Mr. Hume's motion will take place to-night. The motion, we presume, will be rejected by a. large majority, and the people will have to carry on an agi- tation for Parliamentary Reform for some time, though not till the year 1900or 1950 as the Times supposes. During the week .a vast number of petitions have been presented. D. The news from Ireland continue to- be of an alarming: nature. The organisation of clubs is proceeding- with great rapidity; and there is now every prospect of the country being armed before the harvest is in. We believe Govern- ment is actively engaged in taking precautionary measures: Well it were if they displayed similar activity in providing remedial schemes. Ireland requires social and moral remedies for her restoration, but thus far no such remedies have been offered. The Emerald Isle will not be governed by bribing its priests or transporting its agitators, but by making the people happy and prosperous, and thus rendering agitation impossible. The eventful scenes of Paris have cast every other conti- nental transaction to tho shade this week. The Insurrection in Paris has been suppressed, and all the provincial towns, with the exception of Marseilles, continue tranquil. In that town the insurrection, after continuing for a day, was sup- pressed. It remains to be seen what policy General Ca- vaignae will pursue. He has had a lengthened inter- view with M. Thiers, but it is not supposed that any union of policy call be effected between them. The present Minis- ters, however, are not likely to keep their places. The affairs of Spain/arc very unsettled, and almost every nation in Europe is more or less convulsed.

...SPAIN.

GREAT WESTERN.

' WEST INDIES.—ADJOURNED DEBATE.

BREACH OF PRIVILEGE.

WRIT FOR DERBY. >,..

I THE ADJOURNED DEBATE

HOUSE OF LORDS, MONDAY, JGKE…

iHOUSE OF COMMONS, MONDAY,…

,OF LORDS, TUESDAY, Juki,…

HOUSE OF COMMONS, TUESDAY,…

HOUSE OF COMMONS, WEDNESDAY,…

JOHN MITCHEL—1THE SHEARWATER.

TO CORRESPONDENTS.

'TION THE FRENCH INSURRECTION.;;