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"CAUGHT AT?AST? OR, THE FELON'S…

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"CAUGHT AT?AST? OR, THE FELON'S…

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That is the question If we could discover the doer his motive might come to light." Look at the matter in another way: discover the motive, and then trace out the doer of whatever has taken place. I do not think that would be so im- possible as might be believed." I cannot imagine anybody to have an interest in White's removal, M. Parlandet." chap 27 No Let us put a case. Suppose a merchant to possess a daughter for whom he desires to make an advantageous match. Suppose the lady, on the other hand, intends to please herself and not her father. Suppose, further, that an ambitious under- line dares to raise his eyes to one every way above him, and that his daring is attended with success. Suppose, once more, that the underling suddenly dis- appears. having been last seen at night in the country-house, and in the society of that merchant who desires his daughter should not wed beneath her. He is not seen to quit the house. A servant admits him, but no servant lets him out. What is the in- ference ? Is lie in that house still ? Scandal might say—I do not maintain it does—here was the motive even for a crime. What is your opinion ?'' Against such suppositions I should set the evidence of character, the testimony of those who knew the merchant, and believed him incapable of such a deed. We are only supposing, M. Parlandet. Shall I complete your tale ? Suppose a comrade of this underling had once in his life done a very bad and cruel thing." M. Parla-ndet started, so suddenly and with such violence, that he upset the glass over the taNe, and flooded the chessboard. He, too he muttered. "Plague seize the chattering tongue of that old jade What is the matter, M. Parlandet ?" demanded KIeckser. Look what confusion you have made." Nothing, my friend, nothing whatever. A sudden spasm-nothing more. Pray continue with your in- teresting suppositions." KIeckser looked hard at M. Parlandet for a moment, then went on: chap 27 Suppose the underling had discovered this thing, and in a heedless moment had let his comrade see %is secret was known. Suppose the comrade feared that it might come to the knowledge of their common employer, and that he should be summarily dismissed. Suppose, lastly, the comrade were known to stick at nothng, and never to forgive a man by whom he had been offended. Would it not be possible there might be a motive here ? If so, it might not be dinjcult to find the doer." chap 27 Dear M. KIeckser, your fiction is ingenious but absurd," returned M. Parla.ndet, blandly, having by this tiim recovered his composure. Vague sup- positions are neither motives nor facts. My pre- sumptions were prefaced by the observation that I put a case. I did not sta,te it as a positive reality, nor could anything be further from my ideas. I shall, therefore, if you please. continue my harmless little remarks. Suppose, then, the motive for a crime were discovered, and also the doer to be brought to justice. Would it not become the duty of even those dependent upon the perpetrator to assist in tha.t Ia.uda,b!e object ? There can be but one answer, I presume, to this." Uependupoft it. M. Pa.r!anc!ot," returned IGecJŒer, that. dropping met.iphor, if a crime has been com- mitted in the case of White, it will be not only a duty, but a pleasure to all who ha.vQ' loved him to see the doer punished. It is enough. I have a hea.d- ache. Let us go," J And Kleckscr iise, abruptly from the bench. I a,m precisely of your opinion, dearest friend," returned M. Par)a,ridet, calmly. ut our game ? What shall become of tha.t exciting contest which we have altogether forgotten ? Finish him another time ? Well. a- you Lke; but we need not leuve our wine. Come, thHtg is parity of time. Your head- ach is too violent ? We!I, we will go. if you insist. I am a.) ways ea,e to oblige a friend. M. attempt to induce KIeckser to believe in the fictir'n he I'4d determined to set up hnd, there- JorH, signally fai!6(j. He had gone as f;)r as he dared, an<i had found tl'6 German incorruptible. Still, he was not utterly discontented with his evening's work. A b-iriT .1 g At vi,i-io,-is tin'ex, nnd carefully watching Iii. op- p<n'tt.t;!?y. M. Pa.r?rjdetrpnpa.ted this H't!c perform- ance. with tri fiin varhtions, for the b<'nent of GrwiUim and Whiles. With these two he could ve!it"e to spea.1: ttore plainly than with KIeckser. As WJÜfHes, the effect was disastrous. He the t)ot«''n of Van Flecker having bf-'en concerned in1laynlOnd'¡; removal wir.h a warmth of indignation surrri¡n; to the tempter. It daunted him po V tha.t he did not venture ) to t?ce the fu.r?'hcr stpp of mRinun.t.in? the duty of ? bringing the perpetrator of the wrong to justice, p, L which he had so CM?ou;?- essayed with KIecI?er. GwiHim, upon the other ha.nd, impulsive, and more liable to be led a.wa.y by a-'tifice, at once i'eil into the trap baited by M. })al'lani!et. GwiU'trn an" TvI.l>trlandet had been to the opera together. After the performance they repaired for ,,iir),r t,) a cafe. During- the mea.1 M. Parlandet ski!fuuv hrnngitt ronnd the converpa.tion to the topic uppe' mcs' in his mino, I "Ex-trawdinajy, the continued absence of our htA colleague he remarked. "There ca,n be, I think, but one interpretation to be placed upon his disappearance. What tha,t is, you can guess as well as I." "Well, upon lyty 'word, M. P-P-Parlandet, I'm q-a-quite at a Io?s to know to what you allude." Ah hah Co, my young friend. You jest. You !nock yourself at your ancient comrade. It cannot be that a man of your lucid and perspicuous mind should hn.ve titled to perceive in whose in- terest the sudden roilloval of this M. Vhite so clearly lay." "'P-p-pon my hotiotir, M. Parlandet!" repeated Gwiliim. growing earnest, i am c-c-comp'etely in the dark. I hadn't the slightest n-n-notion that White ever stood in Anybody's way." How ? You shall tell me that it has escaped your perspicacity that someone a great, an illnstriou. man- exists to whom it was positive necessity in order to pre-vent the overthrow of all his p!ans, that M. Yhite should disappear ? Sosae ) one blessed with the possession of a child, gracious and beautiful, to whom this aspiring youth had positively dared to raise his plebeian eyes P You shall tell me you ar6Hot able to point your finger at this illustrious man Wh:tt'" exclaimed (}wi!Hm, for a wonder without a stutter: why, you surely don't mean Mr. van FIewker." "Hssssh!" whispered M. Parlandet, raising a cautious nnger, and glueing warily around we t will mention no names, dear Grwillim, if you please. Walts, as you know, llide sememes ears. But I was

"CAUGHT AT?AST? OR, THE FELON'S…