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- CAUGHT AT LAST; OR, THE…

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The dt-i.t M)<'nc<' prevaitcti m t,hf ottice after Klfckser's d(,pmrture.sii--n(-f- broken onty by the monotonous ticking "f thf ctor-k. and the murmur of voices penetrati"f tn the tl)roufl) the partly opejt door. WhiffleR anol <,wi!tim d«rpd at each othfr in atarn). Rapid steps wprp presently h«ard, and J<It'Cher, foil ved by Pordy, dashed with horror-stricken countenance into the room. Goot heaven he cried, throwing up his ha.nds. Something has happened to that poor tea.r Vhite! His mother eay he has not pft'n homf all night! Noting has peen seen or heard of him t;ince yes terday morning vhen he letve his home:" You don't say ao'" exclaimed his startled hearers. But I to I told her Parl had st-t.t him to Rich- mond. and have shown her into fie governor, who saw him last. She is mit him now." I can't understand it," said Whiffles, the calmer of the two, reHectiveiy. GwiHim was labuuring at a speech, but excitement deprived him of utterance. I can't understand it at all." Whiles repeated. If he were a different sort of man. I ahoutd say there was nothing fxtraordinary: but nobody, I suppose, will fancy White could have gone upon the spree." "Gone upon do spree'"exclaimed Kleekser, with indignant deriaion. Raymond Vhite's not de kind ef fellow for dat folly, inteet. Depend upon it, some- ting has happened—someting treadful, am terribly afraid. Ach me! ach me! and I had dat foolish quarrel mit de poor tpar fellow yesterday On!y tink how chocking it vill pe if he should have testroyed himself for fear of de gonsequences. I should never forgive myself — never!" He doubled his arms upon his desk, dashed his head upon them, and gfoaned in unanected bitterneae of heart Spite of their genuine apprehension as to their colleague's fate, Gwillim and Whiffles were so tickled by the absurdity of the notion of Raymond's having made away with himself for fear of Kleckser's re- sentment, that they burst into a simultaneous roar of laughter. Kleckser started up indignantly, tears glistening in his honest eyes as be faced his comrades. Vhat for you laugh P" he demanded, angffly. Toes it strike you as so fery comic dat de poM old mother comes here trembling and sick nut apprehension to temand her son ? Hate you no hearts, no feelings? How to you link your silly mirth must strike upon her tortured soul? She comes here, after sitting up mil her taughter aM night, listening to every footstep in de hope dat it might pe her son's, to ask if ve know anyting apout him, and symoatet,c Messrs. Vhinie and GviHim mock and j,i-er her agony. Shame upon you young men —fh<Mne upon vou H:u)g it, Kh'ckser, don't be so unjust, man," retorted Whiffl. We're every bit as sorry for whott-ver may have happened as you canboal. We were not laughirg at that, nor at the poor old mother either. It wao your absurd supposition that upset ue." "My apeurd subhosition'" repeated the German. *'Vhy. con-fount your imputenct'! Pray——Hue I shan't 'take de trouble of explaining myself any longer. I can tink of noting put dat poor tear Vhite. Oh, vhat can'have happened?" chap 23 ") CHAPTER XXIV. P.!f]Kt'CAL.WA'B. MFANTY" in the merchant's private room, a different Mene wa< enacting. Mrs. White bad acquainted Van PtfWker with her son's unaccouotitble disappearance. His surprise was only equaUfd by his annoyance. Turning savagely upon Parlandet, present at the interview, he demandfd why he had not been told of this before. M. Parlandet shrugged his &boulders. I did not hear till 1 reached the onice this morning thatM. Vhite had not arrived. I learn now. for the nrst time, that he has remained away from home during the night. Further. I see nothing to cause alarm. M{. Vhite is young and foolish. He is not the Urst man who has given his friends a fright by a day's absence, and has y<*t subl'lt!t.iUt'ntly returned A mere youth- ful escapade, my benefactor, believe me nothing more." Y01Jdonot know my boy, sir," returned Mrs. White. eev'rely. Raymond. Mr. van Flewk,-r, differs from many. Hh prin<p'cf protect h m trom dissipation. For this Vfry reason his abgence mahea me fear seme serious misfortune." "Grieved as I naturally am to differ from a lady," observe the gaHaut M. 1'ariandct, t am totally unable to share tt)e St-nt.im<'titi< of My ex. perience of young men's fadings is probably more extended than hers. Without doubt, M. Vhite will sptedity re-appear. A little sobered, perhaps, by his outbreak; not so apt to be severe upon the faults of others, and richer by an experience. Madllm"'j\ anxiety is pardonable —fven natural-for a wo)t'<m B H x eleM tone and attempt to treat the matter ao thu merest trifle were cl,-verli, assumed, but it wa* noticeable that throughout thp interview he teduloualy kept his eyes averted from th.. motlier's face, never mt hfr gaxe, never answered directly anything she ta)d. 111 his speeches were addressed to his patron. "I have htardof you, sir. from my son," said Mre. White to 1'arl, and am not astonished at your remarks. If my son's character requires jufttincation, I sbtdl reply; otherwise, it is needless." i aMure you MttdameVhitt' declared VanFiewker, to whOtn ahe \àp.red to tddrets the concluding tentence, "that I't'mnotofM.Parlandet'e opinion. On the contrary, I i*Ve a very high regard for M. ftywood, your eon, Mu ttn exceedingly distressed tt Ms abiwace,. I Gall and wormwood to M. Parlandet as were VM Flewker's worda, he huned Itimself in secret to think how ldug that lamented absence WM likely tt tndurt Mrs. White aimply bewed and continued: My only further anxiety is for my son. Mr. Kleckser tells me lie was last 5(-en in your house. Is there no oss, possible c!u« that, you can give me as to where he may be now ?" Very quiet and sfjf-containpd, her voice not raised above its ordinary pitch, there was a simpte pathos in her manner that .<pusibly touched Van FIewker." IJ ppr'mt u!H to assure you, madame," he repeated, "that I H)Tt as ntueh at a Joss to gues what. has hecNfw of M. Whire as yourself. I can only say that he Iwft. my house about half-past nine o'clock, intend- e in. I j)t'Hsu)t!f. to I't'turn h tme. Further, I have no idea. wh<tt can have happened to him." I "I feared Om much!" sigiM'd Mra. White, from "ten her tigbt-clfncbed tipa. My boy my boy 0

- CAUGHT AT LAST; OR, THE…