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Halloa!" exclaimed Parl. "What is this? Im- possible Alas alas! I am ruined, lost, irretrievably f and for ever Ah my wretched, wretched memory! My patron will never forgive me-never He threw himself upon a chair, and buried his face in his hands. The two men looked first at him, then at each other, with astonished surprise, A bystander, however, skilled in interpreting expression, would at once have perceived that Raymond's wonder was genuine, Chatouilleux's feigned. "Why, M. Parlandet!" exclained Raymond, laying his hand sympathisingly upon the shoulder of his chief. What's the matter ?" "Lost—ruined—undone!" groaned Parl from be- tween his fingers. Pooh, pooh! Tell me, at any rate, what ails you ?" "Alas the parcel moaned M. Parlandet patheti- cally then proceeded in rapid jerks to explain. My patron desired particularly to receive this parcel to-day. Anxious to give him pleasure, I obtained it on my road to the office. I intended, of course, to deliver it to my benefactor there. Unluckily, my treacherous memory played me false. Now what shall I do ? It is highly important, I know. M. van Flewker is anxious to receive itJI do not know his address at Richmond. Ihave never been there. As well may I seek a needle in a haystack. Besides, the sacred rights of hospitality retain me here. I cannot leave my friend. No, M. Vhite, no! I am lost, I am undone! Farewell!" Why did he stop and raise his head a little to listen- anxiously for Raymond's answer? Was it that he anticipated the proposal he had so cleverly invited ? It came. But, my dear M. Parlandet," interposed Ray- mond, "I see in all this no reason for despair. Naturally you cannot leave your friend, who, I suppose, is a stranger here, and probably doesn't speak the lan- guage." "Only arrived this morning, and cannot speak one English word," asserted M. Parlandet in a breath. But if you like to entrust the parcel to me, I will take it down to Richmond at once, and deliver it myself into M. van Flewker's own hands." M. Parlandet rose with a radiant countenance, and instantly cast himself into Raymond's arms. Noble young man he exclaimed with sobs of emotion. How can I ever repay your disinterested goodness Here is the parcel. Hasten with it to Richmond and if it would not be asking too great a favour I would beg you to look in here upon your re- turn, to satisfy my mind before I sleep that my patron is not incensed with his humble Parlandet." Raymond promised to comply with M. Parlandet's last request, unless he should be detained too long at Richmond to enable him to do so and, taking leave of the two friends, set forth upon his way. M. Parlandet and his companion maintained an attitude of eager attention until they heard the street- door close behind Raymond, then turned to one another with a smile of satisfaction. "Trapped at last!" observed M. Chatouilleux triumphantly. chap 21 We have him now, Poing, I think," returned M. Parlandet, gleefully rubbing his hands. Give him ten minutes to get well out of view, and then away tit thy post. Whichever way he goes, thou wilt be there before him. Aha! M. Vhite, my very good friend, you have given me some trouble, but I fancy we have stopped your eminent career at last. Still, prudenca forbids our triumph till the end is sure. Caution, my Poing, and foresight will be much required. Thou knowest the ground, and' shouldst be able to calculate to a foot the spot where thou wilt meet him, Wait till the coast is clear, and then- He clenched his fist, and threw it upwards towards his shoulder with a gesture his companion perfectly understood, for he nodded repeatedly. I shall expect thee to report success by twelve, at latest," Parl went on. Till then, I will await thee in the cafe. After that time I shall be here. Is it agreed ?" "Agreed!" said his companion, and the two shook hands. A parting glass now, Poing," said M. Parlandet again. "Not more-thou must keep thy head cool. Here's to the success of both our enterprises-first, of this little one, then of the great." They drained their glasses to the dregs, then hastily joined hands again, and parted. Meantime, Raymond White tranquilly pursued his way up Piccadilly, intending to take a Richmond omnibus, as M. Parlandet had expected. One over- took him shortly, and he seated himself outside. As the vehicle passed Chelsea, a churck clock hard by struck the hour. Seven o'clock," thought Raymond, counting the strokes. Another hour will take me to Richmond, ,j and ten minutes' sharp walking brings me to M. van Flewker's cottage. What a splendid evening!" It was early in May, and therefore nearly dusk. In about an hour the moon would rise. As Raymond had said, it was a splendid evening, one of the delicious gloamings which our fickle climate sometimes bestows at the close of spring as a foretaste of the summer delights in store, and follows up incontinently with weeks of rain and wind. High overhead the sky ex- tended in an even dome of blue, studded at intervals with the stars that were beginning to be visible singly, in pairs, in clusters, and in groups. Some heaps of snow-white clouds, tinged with the few rays that had loitered behind the sun, broke the uniform blueness of the firmament, and marked the spot through which the moon would break. The air was fresh and in- vigorating, without being cold. As the omnibus emerged from the house-rows, and drove on through market-gardens and nursery-grounds bounded by hedges, faint gusts of perfume began to be wafted across the road upon the gentle evening breeze. At one place a field of lavender, blossoms, several acres in extent, gave out a grateful scent that caused the town-bred passengers eagerly to inhale their fragrance. The recollection of that pleasant odour often recurred to Raymond, months afterwards in very different scenes, rousing a homethirst terrible in the torment of its unslaked intensity. The Richmond omnibus deposited Raymond White at the place of his destination shortly after eight o'clock. He crossed the bridge, and went along by the side of the river towards Twickenham, in the direction of Van Flewker's house. The furnished cottage hired by Mynheer Fabian van Flewker lay upon the bank of the river. It was called a cottage; but I need hardly say, that being a Richmond cottage, it was a tolerably spacious house, with stables, lawn, and carriage-drive, conservatory and greenhouses, large gardens and shrubberies, and everything that auctioneers style the usual appurts" of a gentleman's summer abode. Placed in its own grounds, the front of the cottage stood a little back from the main road, while in the, pw an eaey slope led to the water's edge. There wat a boat-boose here, and a craak-k>okjpL.ttrwcture- wMriithe landlord h

i-----CAUGHT AT LAST; OB,…