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i-----CAUGHT AT LAST; OB,…

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i-- CAUGHT AT LAST; OB, THE FELON'S BRAND. TALL RIGHTS RZSMYZDJ CHAPTER XXI, fC MY FRIEND FROM PARIS." SHORTLY after six o'clock that evening, Raymond White punctually made his appearance at the West- end branch. He was not particularly pleased at being Compelled to encroach upon the scanty leisure which was of right his own but it was one of the business peculiarities of that unbusiness-like firm to transact its affairs at all sorts of extraordinary hours. Voices were audible in M. Parlandet's presence- Chanjber when Raymond knocked at the door—voices and hearty laughter—with clinking of glasses and a gurgling sound which he knew could only proceed from the pouring out of wine. "Oh!" he thought, "M. Parlandet has visitors this evening, seemingly. I suppose h i has forgotten all about my calling for instru, tion, The dis- arrangement, of his faculties by our p ppery friend's ruler appears to be set to rights by this time. Let us see." He kneel: i d at the door, and entered at M. Par- landet's reply. "Aha: deitr M. Vhite!" exclaimed M. Parlandet, who was appa-rentty in the highest possible spirits. Welcome, my instructor, my guide,philosopher, and friend! To hut am I indebted for this extraordinary pleasure? But stop. permit me first to present to you am->ti)er old ar-d very dear friend, just arrived from Paris, M. Jules, my brave, let me introduce rh- < t., \1. Yiiire. Enchanted to have the op)K.f.i'irty to known one to the other two gentlemen of and singular merit. The two IRIMI II-H/'C acquainted in these high-flown terms boweo è1Jl<l 'C, iked as foolish as men ordinarily look luifi r ■••'u-rar eijeumst;; rices, then eyed each otliP!- M. CL.rouilleux was a fresh- coloured fellow or aoout Raymond's age, also willi s. "č:U fie con>pii?\i>in and light-coloured hair In build, at.d <•>««! frame, even in facial expressions. the two might have pass< d'for brothers. The main difer<>iu:« lay in the eyes and general re- finement of leafure. in which respects Raymond had greatly the There v.as a downcast look about tJi, a kind of "by reluctance fairly and ovenly to meet another's «a/.e, which might per- haps have been set down to the bashfulness not usual among his nation, but which contrasted strongly with the free and honest, glance of the young Lancastrian. Further difference existed in their mode of wearing the beard, M. Chatouilleux's adorn- ments in that respect being cut to Paris fashion. The general likeness, however, .between the two was sufficiently noticeable to strike M. Parlandet, who exclaimed, looking from one to the other-- "Jules! thou and M. Vhite might be taken for twins. Astonishing, the similarity in your appearance 1 If I did not know all thy relations so thoroughly, I could swear that you were brothers at jeast. Btft dear M. Vhite," he continued, you have not yet told me to what I am indebted for the happiness of seeing you here to-night. Do not Suppose for a moment that I am not charmed: but it was a pleasure I hardly dared to expect." Surely, M. Parlandet, you must recollect that I Call by your own appointment," answered Raymond, II made in Augustine-close this afternoon, to receive Instructions for important letters." Ah, then you evidently did not receive my message,, asking you to postpone your visit till to-morrow," responded Pari, in a tone of great vexation. How' unfortunate that my carelessness should have put you to such needless trouble. And yet -1 telegraphed it before six. How was that ?" « You forget that I necessarily left the City early, to be here in time," returned Raymond. No message reached the Close before I came away." Tah ejaculated M. Parlandet apparently JXluch annoyed. Dear M. Vhite, I have to b.eg of you at the least one thousand pardons for bringing you here in vain. I congratulate myself again, upon the other hand, for the chance that procures me a. pleasure at once so precious and so rare. It is im- possible that I shall give you the instructions to-night. To-morrow, however, will do equally well. Come, as '1 you are here, let us spend the evening together—you, jny friend, and I. We will be very sober and very irational. You shall be our Gamaliel; we will sit at your feet and learn to be good boys. Jules, my brave, ying for another glass for M. Vhite." But Raymond had no desire to be M. Parlandet's guest, and to enact Gamaliel for the benefit of himself, and his friend. ParFs ready falsehood that after- poon, coupled with his language and his demeanour j pow, had started into life the old suspicions his recent good behaviour had almost lulled to sleep. The con- version was only superficial, that was clear-perhaps '1 even worse, and utterly hypocritical. Were this last gurmise correct it must have been for a purpose. Was that purpose to allay all mistrust ? Then, too, this stranger, with the downcast look-this intimate friend of M. Par'andet, never heard •spoken of before-who was he? Sudden alarm arose in Raymond's mind lest this Blight be the myjsterious Poi)icl-qui- i-appe," against whom he was so solemnly warned in the letter of his anonymous friend. These thoughts take minutes to write thpy fiew in a second through Raymonds brain; and his hand arrested that of M. Chatouilleux, about, at M. Parlandet's request, to ring the bell. Pardon, M. Parlandet," he said. I shall be glad if you will excuse me, as there is no business necessity to remain. I never pass the evening away from my family if it can possibly be avoided. Indeed, you must permit me to go now." He turned to take his hat, and missed a glance of intelligence exchanged between the two. The stranger pointed rapidly with his thumb over his shoulder to- wards the window. M. Parlandet nodded. Ah, well, dear M. Vhite," he observed with a sigh, ..S if the necessity of parting with his young friend were very cruel; what must be, must. Painfully sensible of the inferiority of our companionship to the society of your charming family, we yield to the ,ad decrees of adverse Fate. Some other time, and at J a very early date, we must hope that Fortune will be more propitious. Farewell, dear M. Vhite, fare- well 1" chap 21 He bad clipped his hand into his pocket as he spoke, but drew it out as rapidly as if it bad been bitten, bringing to view a little parcel well secured with String, sealed over, to prevent illicit cpenlng, witli pany meatf — -VN-tk 0

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i-----CAUGHT AT LAST; OB,…

i-----CAUGHT AT LAST; OB,…